Search found 1792 matches

by roninbodhisattva
Wed 27 Jun 2018, 06:17
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random ideas: Morphosyntax
Replies: 685
Views: 76301

Re: Random ideas: Morphosyntax

eldin raigmore wrote:
Tue 26 Jun 2018, 22:06
A ‘Lang in which the last syllable (or so) of any proper noun is homophonous with the 3rd-person pronoun by which one refers to the proper noun’s referent.
A phenomenon similar to this is attested found (rather rarely). See this paper for an analysis of one such system.
by roninbodhisattva
Mon 23 Mar 2015, 01:01
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Reference grammar of conlangs?
Replies: 40
Views: 5103

Re: Reference grammar of conlangs?

Check out Matt Pearson's Grammar of Okuna. It's one the best conlang grammars I know of.
by roninbodhisattva
Fri 12 Dec 2014, 22:51
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages
Replies: 19
Views: 3224

Re: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages

One thing that could a be little helpful towards the search: What properties specifically are you ascribing to "quirky" subjects here? Are we just looking for those subjects that bear non-regular subject cast but seem to share other subject like properties?[/quote] Yes, that's right.[/quote] You ma...
by roninbodhisattva
Thu 11 Dec 2014, 09:23
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages
Replies: 19
Views: 3224

Re: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages

One thing that could a be little helpful towards the search: What properties specifically are you ascribing to "quirky" subjects here? Are we just looking for those subjects that bear non-regular subject cast but seem to share other subject like properties? Also, you might want to check out Muskogea...
by roninbodhisattva
Tue 09 Dec 2014, 08:18
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages
Replies: 19
Views: 3224

Re: Quirky subjects in polysynthetic languages

Hi all--I would like to know what polysynthetic languages, if any, have quirky subjects and perhaps are split-S/fluid-S. I'm a tad confused at this phrasing. Are you looking for: Option 1: (A) Polysynthetic languages that have quirky subjects (B) Polysynthetic languages that have Split/Fluid-S alig...
by roninbodhisattva
Fri 17 Oct 2014, 17:21
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Let's Talk about Syntax (NP: Topic Ideas etc)
Replies: 50
Views: 22839

Re: Let's Talk about Syntax (NP: Topic Ideas etc)

I'll eventually be back around and maybe do something with it. Very busy at the moment.
by roninbodhisattva
Wed 27 Aug 2014, 16:14
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: That awkward moment when you...
Replies: 27
Views: 6958

Re: That awkward moment when you...

Over the summer I spent a lot of time at home going through old piles of papers and such that my mother wanted me to go through so that I could clear out my old room...oh boy did I find all the old conlanging things. It was quite the trip down memory lane. I've got a couple big folders of these thin...
by roninbodhisattva
Sun 24 Aug 2014, 00:45
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Grammar and Syntax in a conlang
Replies: 15
Views: 2010

Re: Grammar and Syntax in a conlang

Great Angemon wrote:@Xing: I use affixes to show things like case, plurality and inflection.
Just a nitpick correction here: case and plurality are inflectional categories, or they can be. Inflection refers to the type of process that indicates the values of these categories, if that makes sense.
by roninbodhisattva
Fri 22 Aug 2014, 00:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is V:C a valid rhyme in the proto-language? I would find something like the following plausible, which is pretty similar to your original idea, where "v" is the shortest of the three lengths: vC > VC: VC > VC V:C > V:C Neutralizes the contrast in the shorter two vowel quantities but moves the distin...
by roninbodhisattva
Thu 21 Aug 2014, 16:35
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Pluralses and rereduplication
Replies: 27
Views: 4424

Re: Pluralses and rereduplication

I think by dupleme he just means the element that is reduplicated. In some languages, the entire root morpheme may not be reduplicated, so in that case you can't say it's just the root morpheme twice in a row. On the other hand, the reduplicated element has no consistent form, so it can't be recogn...
by roninbodhisattva
Thu 21 Aug 2014, 08:40
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Pluralses and rereduplication
Replies: 27
Views: 4424

Re: Pluralses and rereduplication

Some languages have a "dupleme", if that's the word, that is, partial or full reduplication counts as an -eme of some sort (probably a morpheme, but maybe a phonish-eme.) What you call a dupleme here is generally called the reduplicant in the reduplication literature. I don't really get what you me...
by roninbodhisattva
Wed 20 Aug 2014, 20:32
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

On the other hand, it does appear, IIRC, as a paralinguistic feature in Norwegian in which the word "ja" is sometimes spoken while inhaling. It's similar in a way to the paralinguistic use of clicks in that it's not part of the phoneme inventory, but still appears in speech. My advisor is Danish an...
by roninbodhisattva
Wed 20 Aug 2014, 19:28
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I have never heard of a vowel system that contrasts ingressive vs. egressive vowels.
by roninbodhisattva
Wed 20 Aug 2014, 05:15
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ahzoh wrote:
roninbodhisattva wrote:
Ahzoh wrote:all right, I suppose ANADEW.
Well, more like "that's a pretty standard vowel 9 vowel system"
Really? I wonder how many languages have it.
Many of these questions can be answered by looking at WALS (found here) and then checking sources.

Also, look at this page on vowel systems.
by roninbodhisattva
Wed 20 Aug 2014, 03:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ahzoh wrote:all right, I suppose ANADEW.
Well, more like "that's a pretty standard vowel 9 vowel system"
by roninbodhisattva
Tue 19 Aug 2014, 20:52
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Finiteness in your Conlangs
Replies: 1
Views: 598

Finiteness in your Conlangs

Just wondering really, does your conlang make a finite/non-finite distinction? And if so, what characterizes finite vs. non-finite clauses?
by roninbodhisattva
Mon 18 Aug 2014, 18:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Heterosyllabic consonant cluster, maybe?
by roninbodhisattva
Mon 18 Aug 2014, 07:04
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

so you say that /s/ becomes nasalized fricative in the environment of before nasal vowels? Well, the language doesn't have nasal vowels, so I'll have to develop those. V/V[+nasal]/_N? Sure, that's a way you could do it to. I wasn't saying that's the only way. Just that it's one way to do. You could...
by roninbodhisattva
Mon 18 Aug 2014, 06:51
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13846
Views: 846710

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

by s[+nasal] I mean a nasalized fricative. By Ṽ I mean a nasalized vowel. Oh, all right. Yea, I'm not familiar with all this sound change syntax. The general syntax is: X > Y / Z Where... X = the beginning state of the sound in question > = "goes to" Y = it's changed state / = in the environment of...