Search found 1468 matches

by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 12:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 11
Views: 192

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

I mean even if you stick to the rule of broad to broad and slender to slender, it's still hard to tell which of two or three vowels actually gets pronounced. Not really. At first sight, sure, but in a case like this all Isfendil needs to do is have a text on one hand and a chart of the dozen differ...
by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 00:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 11
Views: 192

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

Would it be possible for someone to take a fairly long irish text and try their best spell it pseudo phonetically, using the entire latin alphabet? I would like to see irish as it is and even though I'm told the spelling is very systematic its just . . . . So obtuse. I've been spoiled by welsh. You...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 14:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 563041

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But PG *b (what ever its realization at the time was) usually produces /b/ in English and Swedish, am I right? (Danish does regularly have a fricative I think.) /v/ intervocalically. There's also the Grammatischer Wechsel which basically says that the moving accent of PIE exempted some forms of ver...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 01:06
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 563041

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The problem with both these examples is that they demonstrate Verner's Law. Grimm'saw would have the *p in both *leip- and *kap- become *f (voiceless bilabial fricative) in PG which then gets voiced according to Verner's Law. From there, given the instability of bilabial fricatives, the changes can...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 00:45
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 563041

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But they are not reconstructed *hafa- and *lifa with fricatives that directly yeald /v/ in English at least. But they are reconstructed with *b . And if *b was a fricative, then it was a fricative that directly yields /v/ in English. Eg. in "have" and "live", which both come from words with *b in t...
by Salmoneus
Sat 13 Oct 2018, 23:58
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 563041

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Nobody knows whether proto-germanic had stops or fricatives. Indeed, it may well have been that these phonemes had both realisations, or that there may always have been regional or other variation. It's all very well saying 'oh, but B>b in German is better than b>B in all the other languages', but t...
by Salmoneus
Fri 12 Oct 2018, 18:27
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1493
Views: 86464

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

"Wednesday"?
by Salmoneus
Sun 07 Oct 2018, 01:44
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What do a language and a dialect consist of?
Replies: 4
Views: 170

Re: What do a language and a dialect consist of?

There is no useful distinction between a language and a dialect - they are two terms for the same thing. At least, there is no distinction that is useful for all purposes, although specific fields of activity may find it useful to devise a distinction for their own purposes. For instance, for the pu...
by Salmoneus
Sat 06 Oct 2018, 21:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 648
Views: 88604

Re: False cognates

coop vs cubby vs cubicle And come to think of it: cube vs cubicle . -icle is such a common diminutive, and the two are so close in meaning, that it seems almost impossible that they're not related. But "cubicle" is actually an instrumental derivative of a verb for lying down - hence, "lying down pl...
by Salmoneus
Sat 06 Oct 2018, 12:08
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 21
Views: 524

Re: Words to mean Friend

It seems to be that the French ‘ami’ has something to do with love Yes, most Romance languages have a descendant of Latin amicus , which derives from amo , "to love". Salmoneus' mention of drinking buddies reminds me of companion , "one with whom one shares bread". Ooh, I never thought about that. ...
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 18:37
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Depends where it's spoken! And what other letters are used, and how!

Options include s-cedilla, s-acute, s-dot or more fancifully s-tilde; or c, z, q or x; or ts, or ds, or th; or ss, sc, sz, sth, ths, zs or cs; or c-acute, c-dot, c-cedilla; or d, or d-bar or eth or sd, or....
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 16:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The unmarked case is obviously most natural as a default; however, I'd begin by question your assumptions. What is a "title", and why do your people have them? For instance, book titles that just explain what the book is about may well use the dative or the like ("[on/about] the origin-DAT of specie...
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 16:38
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 21
Views: 524

Re: Words to mean Friend

Hi all, I’m thinking about possibly ways to derive the word for ‘friend’ in Asvolai. I’m not keen to have it stand as its own root, but rather come from a verb or adjective. It seems to be that the French ‘ami’ has something to do with love; and the Arabic (MSA) is sadiiq, which has to do with trus...
by Salmoneus
Thu 04 Oct 2018, 01:18
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Huh? Why? The point of the applicative is that the semantic role of the object is marked on the verb, so that the verb CAN be in the plain accusative. That's why I can't have distinctive applicatives without some additional affixes markers. With just an applicative there are many situations where c...
by Salmoneus
Wed 03 Oct 2018, 12:31
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Perhaps I was making too great of a leap. I looked at applicative solely as a valency increasing process. So far as I'm aware, it's only used for oblique>object processes. Though you raise a good point: I don't know if there's a general term for a valency-increasing process, other than 'valency-inc...
by Salmoneus
Tue 02 Oct 2018, 11:38
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

1-NOM 3-ABL run = I run away from him 1-NOM 3-ACC run-APL = I make him run That's not an applicative, that's a causative. An applicative is a voice that moves a syntactic oblique into object position, without changing its semantic role (indeed, it often marks the role on the verb). What you have he...
by Salmoneus
Sun 30 Sep 2018, 21:47
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I'm thinkin of making a conlang that uses ablaut, but I'm not sure how to make a naturalistic ablaut system. "Ablaut" is a change in vowels. A naturalistic ablaut system is one that arises from natural processes - sound changes that happen often. Germanic verbal ablaut, for example, can mostly be d...
by Salmoneus
Thu 27 Sep 2018, 22:51
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14136
Views: 929989

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Are there any examples of two languages in contact becoming more complex? Absolutely! Mixed languages can adopt complexities from both their parents. The key distinction is that creoles arise where the bilingual speakers have a low level of ability in one or both languages. They cut out the complic...
by Salmoneus
Sat 22 Sep 2018, 16:45
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread
Replies: 1480
Views: 131466

Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

It's also rather soupy here in Suzhou ("Shanghai's backyard") snigger Significant other likes to liken the air to “pea soup”, which is rather apt. It's the traditional metaphor for London air conditions prior to 1956. Most often found in the form "a pea souper", meaning a bout of heavy fog. Indeed,...
by Salmoneus
Fri 21 Sep 2018, 23:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 648
Views: 88604

Re: False cognates

And bothy (small house) isn't related to... well OK, I can't find a modern reflex that sounds like it, but it's somehow not related to Germanic *bo:thla (house). Isn't bothy (together with booth ) from Old Norse búð (< PG *būþō ~*bōþōn )? If this is the case, then both bothy and bold, bottle (and t...