Search found 1475 matches

by Salmoneus
Mon 22 Oct 2018, 01:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: First-contact language
Replies: 9
Views: 122

Re: First-contact language

The 'messages' aren't in binary, but in ternary, as they use three values: plus, minus, and pause. Absence of a signal is also a signal - unless we want to say that computers work in unary.. AT the risk of opening a whole other can of worms, why do Earthlings' computer programming preponder on bina...
by Salmoneus
Sun 21 Oct 2018, 00:35
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: First-contact language
Replies: 9
Views: 122

Re: First-contact language

The 'messages' aren't in binary, but in ternary, as they use three values: plus, minus, and pause. Absence of a signal is also a signal - unless we want to say that computers work in unary..
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 21:55
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 654
Views: 89265

Re: False cognates

OK, this one surprised me, though I've encountered it before... English tally , 'to count' Proto-Germanic taljana , 'to count'. Likewise its derivative talo: , 'calculation, counting', Old Saxon tellian , and modern English tell and tale . The former has ended up with the same meaning and pronunciat...
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 21:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 654
Views: 89265

Re: False cognates

Another naive one from me, I'm afraid: I always used to assume that English quoth had something to do with quote . Given that, you know, they differ in only one letter, and they both refer to spoken words, and 'quoth' is only ever used when quoting, and only differs in connotation from 'to quote'. B...
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 13:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 403

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

I should clarify I’m not a native speaker, just an enthusiastic learner who has used Munster Irish as a base. I’ve actually spent more time in Donegal gaeltachts though. I’ve mostly used resources on West Muskerry Irish - two good books are West Muskerry Irish and Gaeilge Chorca Dhuibhne. Ah, OK. N...
by Salmoneus
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 22:53
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: A sample of clause types
Replies: 4
Views: 113

Re: A sample of clause types

Stassen claims that in languages with inflectional tense marking on verbs predicate adjectives will tend to use the nominal strategy, othereise they'll tend to use the verbal strategy. Oh, that's interesting! I haven't seen that claim before, though it would seem to make sense. 1. How is nominal pr...
by Salmoneus
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 20:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 403

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

There are only dialects - the Caighdeán is officially only a standardised spelling, not a standardised pronunciation or grammar. Although of course I imagine that it practice is does shape the pronunciations of many speakers, particularly as regards the elimination of local anomalies. Davush: oh, no...
by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 12:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 403

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

I mean even if you stick to the rule of broad to broad and slender to slender, it's still hard to tell which of two or three vowels actually gets pronounced. Not really. At first sight, sure, but in a case like this all Isfendil needs to do is have a text on one hand and a chart of the dozen differ...
by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 00:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 403

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

Would it be possible for someone to take a fairly long irish text and try their best spell it pseudo phonetically, using the entire latin alphabet? I would like to see irish as it is and even though I'm told the spelling is very systematic its just . . . . So obtuse. I've been spoiled by welsh. You...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 14:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 566346

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But PG *b (what ever its realization at the time was) usually produces /b/ in English and Swedish, am I right? (Danish does regularly have a fricative I think.) /v/ intervocalically. There's also the Grammatischer Wechsel which basically says that the moving accent of PIE exempted some forms of ver...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 01:06
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 566346

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The problem with both these examples is that they demonstrate Verner's Law. Grimm'saw would have the *p in both *leip- and *kap- become *f (voiceless bilabial fricative) in PG which then gets voiced according to Verner's Law. From there, given the instability of bilabial fricatives, the changes can...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 00:45
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 566346

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But they are not reconstructed *hafa- and *lifa with fricatives that directly yeald /v/ in English at least. But they are reconstructed with *b . And if *b was a fricative, then it was a fricative that directly yields /v/ in English. Eg. in "have" and "live", which both come from words with *b in t...
by Salmoneus
Sat 13 Oct 2018, 23:58
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 566346

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Nobody knows whether proto-germanic had stops or fricatives. Indeed, it may well have been that these phonemes had both realisations, or that there may always have been regional or other variation. It's all very well saying 'oh, but B>b in German is better than b>B in all the other languages', but t...
by Salmoneus
Fri 12 Oct 2018, 18:27
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1493
Views: 87778

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

"Wednesday"?
by Salmoneus
Sun 07 Oct 2018, 01:44
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What do a language and a dialect consist of?
Replies: 4
Views: 205

Re: What do a language and a dialect consist of?

There is no useful distinction between a language and a dialect - they are two terms for the same thing. At least, there is no distinction that is useful for all purposes, although specific fields of activity may find it useful to devise a distinction for their own purposes. For instance, for the pu...
by Salmoneus
Sat 06 Oct 2018, 21:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 654
Views: 89265

Re: False cognates

coop vs cubby vs cubicle And come to think of it: cube vs cubicle . -icle is such a common diminutive, and the two are so close in meaning, that it seems almost impossible that they're not related. But "cubicle" is actually an instrumental derivative of a verb for lying down - hence, "lying down pl...
by Salmoneus
Sat 06 Oct 2018, 12:08
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 21
Views: 668

Re: Words to mean Friend

It seems to be that the French ‘ami’ has something to do with love Yes, most Romance languages have a descendant of Latin amicus , which derives from amo , "to love". Salmoneus' mention of drinking buddies reminds me of companion , "one with whom one shares bread". Ooh, I never thought about that. ...
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 18:37
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14156
Views: 935139

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Depends where it's spoken! And what other letters are used, and how!

Options include s-cedilla, s-acute, s-dot or more fancifully s-tilde; or c, z, q or x; or ts, or ds, or th; or ss, sc, sz, sth, ths, zs or cs; or c-acute, c-dot, c-cedilla; or d, or d-bar or eth or sd, or....
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 16:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14156
Views: 935139

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The unmarked case is obviously most natural as a default; however, I'd begin by question your assumptions. What is a "title", and why do your people have them? For instance, book titles that just explain what the book is about may well use the dative or the like ("[on/about] the origin-DAT of specie...
by Salmoneus
Fri 05 Oct 2018, 16:38
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 21
Views: 668

Re: Words to mean Friend

Hi all, I’m thinking about possibly ways to derive the word for ‘friend’ in Asvolai. I’m not keen to have it stand as its own root, but rather come from a verb or adjective. It seems to be that the French ‘ami’ has something to do with love; and the Arabic (MSA) is sadiiq, which has to do with trus...