Search found 1481 matches

by Salmoneus
Tue 13 Nov 2018, 13:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6751
Views: 584504

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Thanks, creyeditor. I didn’t know that. shimobaatar, I knew about the example you mentioned, and I’m sure that’s right. And thanks! I’m hoping eventually for an explanation both broader (I.e. explaining more uses) and deeper (I.e. explicating the sequence of evolution of the change of use). I might...
by Salmoneus
Tue 13 Nov 2018, 01:55
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14224
Views: 962890

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

(personally tbh I think the whole idea of "allophones" is complete shit, but that's by the by). Just out of curiosity, might I ask why? Because I'm an exemplar theory man, who believes "phonology" is merely an emergent property of a multitude of remembered phonetic word tokens, so while ideas like ...
by Salmoneus
Mon 12 Nov 2018, 15:12
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1627
Views: 96133

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

"well"?

EDIT: and if so, does the whole word mean something like "have a good urination" or "urinate fully"?

[i.e. from PGmc *welamīganą?]
by Salmoneus
Sun 11 Nov 2018, 21:13
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1627
Views: 96133

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

So it's not this, then?
(oh darn, that's a pillow dance, not a pillow song, misremembered).
by Salmoneus
Thu 25 Oct 2018, 21:39
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 29
Views: 1753

Re: Words to mean Friend

The Asta word for "friend" is wenyəsə , which is transparently a derivative of the intransitive verb -enyə "be friendly, welcoming", which has an interesting transitivised form -enyəx which means "to help, advise". Your PIE work leaking through, I see... If there's a PIE parallel to this it is enti...
by Salmoneus
Thu 25 Oct 2018, 13:19
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 29
Views: 1753

Re: Words to mean Friend

Frislander wrote:
Thu 25 Oct 2018, 08:39
The Asta word for "friend" is wenyəsə, which is transparently a derivative of the intransitive verb -enyə "be friendly, welcoming", which has an interesting transitivised form -enyəx which means "to help, advise".
Your PIE work leaking through, I see...
by Salmoneus
Mon 22 Oct 2018, 01:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: First-contact language
Replies: 12
Views: 458

Re: First-contact language

The 'messages' aren't in binary, but in ternary, as they use three values: plus, minus, and pause. Absence of a signal is also a signal - unless we want to say that computers work in unary.. AT the risk of opening a whole other can of worms, why do Earthlings' computer programming preponder on bina...
by Salmoneus
Sun 21 Oct 2018, 00:35
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: First-contact language
Replies: 12
Views: 458

Re: First-contact language

The 'messages' aren't in binary, but in ternary, as they use three values: plus, minus, and pause. Absence of a signal is also a signal - unless we want to say that computers work in unary..
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 21:55
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 658
Views: 93507

Re: False cognates

OK, this one surprised me, though I've encountered it before... English tally , 'to count' Proto-Germanic taljana , 'to count'. Likewise its derivative talo: , 'calculation, counting', Old Saxon tellian , and modern English tell and tale . The former has ended up with the same meaning and pronunciat...
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 21:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 658
Views: 93507

Re: False cognates

Another naive one from me, I'm afraid: I always used to assume that English quoth had something to do with quote . Given that, you know, they differ in only one letter, and they both refer to spoken words, and 'quoth' is only ever used when quoting, and only differs in connotation from 'to quote'. B...
by Salmoneus
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 13:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 1047

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

I should clarify I’m not a native speaker, just an enthusiastic learner who has used Munster Irish as a base. I’ve actually spent more time in Donegal gaeltachts though. I’ve mostly used resources on West Muskerry Irish - two good books are West Muskerry Irish and Gaeilge Chorca Dhuibhne. Ah, OK. N...
by Salmoneus
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 22:53
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: A sample of clause types
Replies: 7
Views: 383

Re: A sample of clause types

Stassen claims that in languages with inflectional tense marking on verbs predicate adjectives will tend to use the nominal strategy, othereise they'll tend to use the verbal strategy. Oh, that's interesting! I haven't seen that claim before, though it would seem to make sense. 1. How is nominal pr...
by Salmoneus
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 20:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 1047

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

There are only dialects - the Caighdeán is officially only a standardised spelling, not a standardised pronunciation or grammar. Although of course I imagine that it practice is does shape the pronunciations of many speakers, particularly as regards the elimination of local anomalies. Davush: oh, no...
by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 12:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 1047

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

I mean even if you stick to the rule of broad to broad and slender to slender, it's still hard to tell which of two or three vowels actually gets pronounced. Not really. At first sight, sure, but in a case like this all Isfendil needs to do is have a text on one hand and a chart of the dozen differ...
by Salmoneus
Tue 16 Oct 2018, 00:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish
Replies: 15
Views: 1047

Re: I'd Like to See Phonetic Irish

Would it be possible for someone to take a fairly long irish text and try their best spell it pseudo phonetically, using the entire latin alphabet? I would like to see irish as it is and even though I'm told the spelling is very systematic its just . . . . So obtuse. I've been spoiled by welsh. You...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 14:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6751
Views: 584504

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But PG *b (what ever its realization at the time was) usually produces /b/ in English and Swedish, am I right? (Danish does regularly have a fricative I think.) /v/ intervocalically. There's also the Grammatischer Wechsel which basically says that the moving accent of PIE exempted some forms of ver...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 01:06
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6751
Views: 584504

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The problem with both these examples is that they demonstrate Verner's Law. Grimm'saw would have the *p in both *leip- and *kap- become *f (voiceless bilabial fricative) in PG which then gets voiced according to Verner's Law. From there, given the instability of bilabial fricatives, the changes can...
by Salmoneus
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 00:45
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6751
Views: 584504

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But they are not reconstructed *hafa- and *lifa with fricatives that directly yeald /v/ in English at least. But they are reconstructed with *b . And if *b was a fricative, then it was a fricative that directly yields /v/ in English. Eg. in "have" and "live", which both come from words with *b in t...
by Salmoneus
Sat 13 Oct 2018, 23:58
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6751
Views: 584504

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Nobody knows whether proto-germanic had stops or fricatives. Indeed, it may well have been that these phonemes had both realisations, or that there may always have been regional or other variation. It's all very well saying 'oh, but B>b in German is better than b>B in all the other languages', but t...
by Salmoneus
Fri 12 Oct 2018, 18:27
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1627
Views: 96133

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

"Wednesday"?