Search found 114 matches

by Alomar
Wed 23 Aug 2017, 20:39
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Has anyone else noticed the metathesis (correct process?) in American English of 'breakfast' to /brɛ.fɪks/?

I've noticed this in two totally separate people (family member from Midwest b 1960s) and coworker in Boston from South Florida b 1980s.
by Alomar
Wed 14 Dec 2016, 04:36
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lexember 2016
Replies: 365
Views: 17698

Re: Lexember 2016

So...I'm playing catch-up here: (Everything is basically IPA, except where noted) 1st: pauno – to bring attention to; to alert; to warn; to forebode Paunon – warning; omen; attention 2nd: eradha /'e.ʁa.ða/– deliver good news (lit. something along the lines of “to word well”) dveradha /'dve.ʁa.ða/ – ...
by Alomar
Wed 14 Dec 2016, 00:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So I just saw on wiktionary (and other places), that for English words ending with "-ing" or "-ink", the vowel is [ɪ]. In all examples of my own dialect, it's definitely . Am I the only one!? So, how do you pronounce <being>? My dialect is the same way and I'd pronounce it [ˈbijiŋ] Although I am bi...
by Alomar
Wed 14 Dec 2016, 00:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So I just saw on wiktionary (and other places), that for English words ending with "-ing" or "-ink", the vowel is [ɪ].

In all examples of my own dialect, it's definitely .

Am I the only one!?
by Alomar
Mon 16 May 2016, 00:42
Forum: Translations
Topic: To see, to watch
Replies: 20
Views: 2784

Re: To see, to watch

In Mychai the verbs of perception don't vary, but for high-agency acts of perception (look at, listen to) the objects are in the accusative (probably as expected), but when the verb is not of high agency (see, hear), the objects are defocused by being in the dative. De Alav lé. de Ala-v lé 1S.AGT wo...
by Alomar
Wed 27 Apr 2016, 20:42
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea
Replies: 30
Views: 3002

Re: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea

Another American here (from Ohio). Breakfast - 7 to 10 AM; typical foods: cereal, eggs, bacon, potatoes, pancakes, coffee, milk, juice, fruit. Generally I eat just a subset of these during the week, but on the weekends a big breakfast might include most of those, and will also happen later in the da...
by Alomar
Wed 20 Jan 2016, 04:43
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 563
Views: 58575

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Lambuzhao wrote: So, lemme add that one:

:esp: congestionado gridlocked (traffic) ≠ :eng: congested blocked up (sinuses, nostrils)
You can definitely use congested in English for traffic.
by Alomar
Wed 04 Nov 2015, 01:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13715
Views: 815583

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

When doing sound changes, would it be realistic for certain changes to only affect grammatical affixes and not the root itself? ... 3) The final consonant of the accusative is taken to be part of the root, but only appears on the surface in certain environments (like liaison in French). Just my two...
by Alomar
Wed 30 Sep 2015, 02:41
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Modal Particles?
Replies: 20
Views: 1300

Re: English Modal Particles?

I still also believe "man" counts as this type of particle, since it is often used without any semantic information at all. No one has provided a counterargument to my claim. Can you provide some examples? The only uses that are coming to mind are "Man, I really have to pee." and the like. To me th...
by Alomar
Tue 29 Sep 2015, 01:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Modal Particles?
Replies: 20
Views: 1300

Re: English Modal Particles?

Yeah, these things are called modal particles in German classes. However, Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik calls them just Particles or even "flavoring particles" and say they add attitude or emotion color to a statement. These seem like those Ancient Greek particles that do similar things. Probably...
by Alomar
Mon 17 Aug 2015, 04:40
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Does anyone have an explanation for why 'daughter' cannot be used vocatively? All of the other kinship terms for immediate family members can be used for direct address (or at least have a derived term for this): mom, dad, bro, sis, son... Why not daughter? Is it a patriarchy thing, or is it a 'daug...
by Alomar
Tue 28 Jul 2015, 02:33
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Yay or Nay?
Replies: 2795
Views: 196094

Re: Yay or Nay?

I'm thinking about making "plosive voicing harmony/assimiliation": e.g. ka when appended with - bi would yield: gabi Does this seem absurd? Would such a system also bleed into the fricatives? Background(maybe): I think my brain is somehow channeling the elimination of multiple voiced aspirates when...
by Alomar
Tue 28 Jul 2015, 01:02
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Yay or Nay?
Replies: 2795
Views: 196094

Re: Yay or Nay?

I'm thinking about making "plosive voicing harmony/assimiliation": e.g. ka when appended with - bi would yield: gabi Does this seem absurd? Would such a system also bleed into the fricatives? Background(maybe): I think my brain is somehow channeling the elimination of multiple voiced aspirates when ...
by Alomar
Thu 16 Jul 2015, 15:18
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Are there verbs that naturally don't have perfective or imperfecive (or other aspectual) readings that don't make any sense? There are verbs which it wouldn't make sense to use in certain aspectual forms and/or situations because of semantics and such, but those verbs could still be conjugated like...
by Alomar
Wed 15 Jul 2015, 23:44
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Are there verbs that naturally don't have perfective or imperfecive (or other aspectual) readings that don't make any sense?
by Alomar
Fri 27 Feb 2015, 02:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6570
Views: 494097

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What are some other ways than using verbs of perception as copulae to convey the same meaning? Of this I mean of the variety: John looks tired. Joan sounds sick. It smells gross. I gather this is really just layering evidentiality over the copula. But I'm curious what else is out there, conlang or n...
by Alomar
Wed 04 Feb 2015, 17:11
Forum: Translations
Topic: Translating into Ancient Greek
Replies: 1
Views: 823

Translating into Ancient Greek

How would I properly translate "It had been hidden" into Ancient (Homeric?) Greek?

I was thinking the medio-passive pluperfect indicative: ἐκέκρυπτο

But it also seems like the passive aorist indicative would work: ἐκρύφθη

Thanks!
by Alomar
Wed 28 Jan 2015, 01:24
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Autonym etymology
Replies: 40
Views: 5342

Re: Autonym etymology

Going off this, how common is it for a demonym to be analogous for the name for the language?
E.g. Deutsch for the language and deutsch for the folk.
by Alomar
Mon 05 Jan 2015, 23:07
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Map Making Program for My Conworld
Replies: 7
Views: 2237

Re: Map Making Program for My Conworld

Honestly, I just use MS Paint (great, underrated program), or even better is InkScape, which is a bit more advanced.
by Alomar
Fri 12 Dec 2014, 21:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Duplication/Plural
Replies: 13
Views: 2638

Re: Duplication/Plural

Answer 1: I think those are the straight-forward ways to combine those two syllables/building blocks/whatevers, but you could reduce or delete vowels yielding things like: /səkab/ /skab/ /kbas/ -> /kpas/ or /gbas/ You could 'infix': /ksab/ And I'm sure there are other possibilities. Answer 2: When ...