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by Creyeditor
Sat 17 Feb 2018, 20:31
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: why is it that in many fantasy stories, humans are the focus?
Replies: 7
Views: 178

Re: why is it that in many fantasy stories, humans are the focus?

You make these relatable for people, still different, without lampshading it.
by Creyeditor
Sat 17 Feb 2018, 19:56
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: How would you redesign IPA?
Replies: 8
Views: 112

Re: How would you redesign IPA?

I would finally add some additional symbols for laterals. ɭ̊˔ is rather silly for what could be simply ꞎ (which is in unicode, but not officially part of IPA!). Same with the palatal and velar laterals. I also feel like some of the sounds could really do with dedicated voiceless symbols, but I have...
by Creyeditor
Thu 15 Feb 2018, 22:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13427
Views: 671522

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Yes, that sounds sensible. You could also invent a new preposition (or something similar) à la Spanish 'a' (again). But it would also work (and be interesting!) without it.
by Creyeditor
Wed 14 Feb 2018, 02:27
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: why is it that in many fantasy stories, humans are the focus?
Replies: 7
Views: 178

Re: why is it that in many fantasy stories, humans are the focus?

I'd see this as as a morton's fork, unfortunately. Prong one: your species are humans who wear strange hats. [/have wings /have bumpy foreheads /have pointy ears /are descended from lizards, etc]. The more you focus on these people, the more obvious it becomes that they are just humans who are wear...
by Creyeditor
Wed 14 Feb 2018, 02:23
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 15
Views: 235

Re: English Dialects

Wasn't there someone using the Vowel Hunter and Praat for phonetic measurements of their vowels? Sal, would you think that such a comparison would be more meaningful?
by Creyeditor
Wed 14 Feb 2018, 00:43
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13427
Views: 671522

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Hungarian IIRC has an a different verbal paradigm for a group of objects, roughly saying definite objects. There might be other effetcs of this that I forgot. Now my Idea is, that if you develop something simila, e.g. accusative marking only for definite subjects a bit à la Spanish, you do not need ...
by Creyeditor
Tue 13 Feb 2018, 22:05
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13427
Views: 671522

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Maybe have a compromise? Maybe have differential object marking for definitness. (Hungarian has it, right?) And then only suffix the article if it is needed to dintinguish it in other positions, like subjects and so on.
by Creyeditor
Tue 13 Feb 2018, 21:59
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13427
Views: 671522

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What are some interesting ways to form Comparatives and Superlatives? Verbal and phrasal ones. Looking at the WALS chapter might help. Things like 'I exceed you in talness' or 'I am tall, you not' are my favorite constructions. Also building the superlative from the comparative by adding 'everyone ...
by Creyeditor
Tue 13 Feb 2018, 01:19
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13427
Views: 671522

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

sangi39 wrote:
Tue 13 Feb 2018, 00:35
Alamblak, a language of Papua New Guinea, according to Steven B. Jackson, associates long and tall things with the masculine gender and round and short things with the feminine gender.
This is actually a crosslinguistic tendency. Khoekhoegowab does something similar for example.
by Creyeditor
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 22:40
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 15
Views: 235

Re: English Dialects

Are there conditions for the ɑ~ä alternations in PALM, START and LOT?
Also I feel like there are some vowels missing, especially the long vowels. Where do they occur?
by Creyeditor
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 22:12
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 15
Views: 235

Re: English Dialects

Could you relate them to Well's lexical sets? That would make comparison easier.
by Creyeditor
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 20:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 336
Views: 28540

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

When you're reading an academic article about TAM marking and you note that some of the author's disagreements with other cited author's analysis look like they're coming down to some people knowing the difference between perfect and perfective and some simply always using "perfective" because it o...
by Creyeditor
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 16:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 336
Views: 28540

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

But the German 'Perfekt' is definitely more liek a past for most speakers in colloquial speech [:D] Recently a discussion has started about Perfects in Typology again and it seems they are a mixed group, especially if you compare them to perfectives. Just think of universal perfect readings, experie...
by Creyeditor
Sun 11 Feb 2018, 10:42
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: New Weekly Indo European Collablang
Replies: 94
Views: 1868

Re: New Weekly Indo European Collablang

Just wanted to mention that I really like the way the declension turn out to be so irregular, I especially like the stem alternation (inherited or not).
by Creyeditor
Sun 11 Feb 2018, 10:28
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random ideas: Morphosyntax
Replies: 643
Views: 56376

Re: Random ideas: Morphosyntax

I had an idea while struggling to come up with something interesting for my conlang's numerals. Certain nouns have secondary meanings. Such as Tupu "Eagle". This word can be used as a numeral if you suffix ka onto it. So Tupuka means "Four". So Tupuka tupu would mean "The four eagles". Isn't that s...
by Creyeditor
Sun 11 Feb 2018, 10:14
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6367
Views: 401773

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I'm wondering how Proto-Afroasiatic *suʔa eventually became Akkadian šū and Ge'ez wəʔətu . Just some guessing, it is really just guesses: Akkadian: Basically, a lot of deletion and palatalization before high vowels: *suʔa > suʔ > šuʔ > šu Ge'ez: deletion, reduction/diphthongization and some morphol...
by Creyeditor
Sat 10 Feb 2018, 18:46
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Last word you learned in a foreign language
Replies: 47
Views: 1714

Re: Last word you learned in a foreign language

English: finale /fɨˈnæli/
English stress is so crazy. How are people supposed to know where the stress is? Is that French -é? If so, why not have ultimate stress? Is it English -e? If so, why pronounce them at all? Seems it's from Italian [¬.¬]
by Creyeditor
Fri 09 Feb 2018, 22:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 479
Views: 35638

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

I have definitely heard 'das Outing' and 'das Coming-Out' in the sense A. 'Seit seinem Outing durch X' sounds better than 'seit seinem Coming-Out durch X' though. On the other hand verbal uses 'sich outen', 'jemanden outen' and 'sein Coming-Out haben' are much more frequent.
by Creyeditor
Fri 09 Feb 2018, 19:50
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: One hour challenge - Da Vinci Quote
Replies: 2
Views: 146

Re: One hour challenge - Da Vinci Quote

I did it. I did it. My personal progress: 00:00 read the sentence again 00:01 decided to have an experiential passive (s.o. once have done something) 00:02 started thinking about how I want to connect the clauses. 00:03 Thought about it really hard. 00:04 got distracted by thinking about idioms 00:0...
by Creyeditor
Thu 08 Feb 2018, 13:12
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 564
Views: 51610

Re: False cognates

To me German Weide willow and English willow , look like they should be related, but I guess they aren't? *d>l is so frequent in Papua but it seems to be non-existant in Europe, IINM. I don’t know if any European languages have had it as a consistent sound change, but Latin had d > l as an irregula...