Search found 711 matches

by Sumelic
Tue 31 Jul 2018, 03:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 561351

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Had any Romance language/dialect treated Latin /a/ differently from /aː/? Or did they merge before any dialectal differences could affect them? I think Dalmatian or something turned long a into [ɔː], but now I can't find the page where I read about that. I haven't found any evidence of that. I beli...
by Sumelic
Tue 31 Jul 2018, 03:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 561351

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ælfwine wrote:
Sun 29 Jul 2018, 23:04
Had any Romance language/dialect treated Latin /a/ differently from /aː/? Or did they merge before any dialectal differences could affect them?
I think Dalmatian or something turned long a into [ɔː], but now I can't find the page where I read about that.
by Sumelic
Sun 13 May 2018, 08:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 34
Views: 4923

Re: English Dialects

LOT/CLOTH [ɒ ~ ɔ] NORTH/FORCE/THOUGHT [ɔː ~ oː] LOT /O/ - non-native. Although at first, this might sound like a lot/cloth split - but that would also suggest European, because the lot/cloth split is something that's dying out in native British English, but that still gets emulated by conservative ...
by Sumelic
Sun 01 Apr 2018, 22:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 821
Views: 85264

Re: English Orthography Reform

I don't know if I'd say "abitrary", but I do find your vowels systematically counterintuitive. And given that you go to so much effort, I'm not sure why you retain ambiguities like your "y" standing for either /i:j/ or /jU:/, two totally different sounds. It probably goes without saying that you've...
by Sumelic
Sun 01 Apr 2018, 10:05
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 821
Views: 85264

Re: English Orthography Reform

Here is the introduction of the Wikipedia article English-language spelling reform rewritten in a reformed spelling I put together today. (It's a major reform, but it does contain some elements based on the current English spelling system.) but I'd be interested in hearing other people's thoughts ab...
by Sumelic
Tue 30 Jan 2018, 23:27
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Does it happen somewhere that if a language does not allow word-initial consonant clusters, s+t clusters undergo metathesis and become geminate ts ? I've never heard of that. The opposite type of metathesis, where an affricate changes to a cluster of sibilant+ stop, seems to have occured (unconditi...
by Sumelic
Sat 27 Jan 2018, 00:52
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: A Curious Kind of English
Replies: 5
Views: 1415

Re: A Curious Kind of English

I wouldn't categorize spelling as part of dialect or idiolect differences. None of the alternative spellings used in the sample text seem to represent any deviance in pronunciation from standard English. There are people today who use moderately reformed spelling along these lines, although not many...
by Sumelic
Sun 17 Dec 2017, 18:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 561351

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is it not simpler to assume that me and my simply merged either in function or just pronunciation? This does seem simpler. But that doesn't fit because this merger of function isn't found anywhere else in the paradigm except in some varieties where "you" and "your" are both reduced to [jə]. And pho...
by Sumelic
Thu 30 Nov 2017, 06:18
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ahzoh wrote:
Thu 30 Nov 2017, 05:12
is /s/ > /a/ ever possible like "ism(a)" > "iam(a)"?
With enough sound changes, almost anything is possible. I can imagine something like /isma/ > /iʃma/ > /iʂma/ > /ixma/ > /iχma/ > /iʁma/ > /iɐma/ > /iama/.
by Sumelic
Sat 25 Nov 2017, 23:55
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am trying to think of some interesting ways word order can interact with case/definiteness. If a language is predominantly SOV, would the following be likely: woman.NOM man.ACC saw 'The woman saw a man' VS woman.NOM saw man.ACC 'The woman saw the man' With a definite object appearing after the ve...
by Sumelic
Tue 21 Nov 2017, 20:20
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

@Smtuval: I think hatelangs are a great way to realise that it’s actually quite difficult to find a feature that you continue hating once you get into it and explore its possibilities. That even goes for things that at first glance seem awful, such as the cluster fl (which incidentally is the only ...
by Sumelic
Tue 21 Nov 2017, 08:03
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am thinking about starting a hatelang, like Creyeditor's Omlut... what do people think of such a thing, and what do you think of the first few sentences that I have translated from "the North Wind and the Sun"? north-GEN wind and sun argue-PST-PLR about two he~PLR which more strong. Djbar-b fteef ...
by Sumelic
Sat 18 Nov 2017, 02:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 821
Views: 85264

Re: English Orthography Reform

The English spelling system is perfectly fine. Strange, yes, but perfectly fine. As Xonen says, that's true if you define "perfectly fine" as something like "not entirely unusable", but there are all sorts of fairly obvious ways the spelling of English words could be improved (if we ignore the cost...
by Sumelic
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 20:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In the present day, some generativists seem to be trying to restrict the use of "linguists" I actually think I have to jump in here. It wasn't necessarily the generativists that first started this game. Some earlier paper introduced the terms B-linguists, C-linguists and D-linguists, which in itsel...
by Sumelic
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 18:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

linguisticians It makes me irrationally angry that this word exists. It's "linguists" dammit! [+1] [+1] Seriously, the only reason this word is a "thing" is because laypeople don't know the word "polyglot" exists. I'm not normall one for prescriptivism but misuse of linguistic terminology really in...
by Sumelic
Tue 07 Nov 2017, 22:46
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 561351

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I firmly believe that Turkish uses <z̧> for /ʒ/ and <j> for /dʒ/, since I refuse to participate in a reality where a major language gets away with using <c> for the latter. The one that always bothers me is Albanian using <x> for /dz/ and <xh> for /dZ/. Even more irritating is that the Bashkimi alp...
by Sumelic
Fri 27 Oct 2017, 23:58
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The Australian languages were the ones I was thinking of initially, but I couldn't remember what restrictions they had. I think it was something to do with the plosives I think many Australian languages, which often have large coronal inventories with things like distinct dental, alveolar, retrofle...
by Sumelic
Tue 24 Oct 2017, 03:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

[Lots of great information...] I think you're right. I think I was trying to just pick things willy-nilly and not really do much in the way of planning out what they will do pr how they will function together. As such, I took some ideas from the questions posed (however not all of them, as the list...
by Sumelic
Fri 20 Oct 2017, 17:29
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14113
Views: 926866

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

https://i.imgur.com/sbZ25jq.png The above is my current system of Aspects and their markers. However, I am wondering if maybe the progressive and imperfective are not distinct enough or perhaps just seem so due to English not having a distinct imperfective? I'm also wondering if the intensive might...
by Sumelic
Fri 20 Oct 2017, 03:48
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6714
Views: 561351

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I asked this question years ago , but I don't think I was able to express myself clearly then. To start, I'll explain what led me to my question. In English, speakers occasionally appear to make a verb agree with the final noun in the subject phrase (or maybe the final noun before the verb) rather ...