Search found 703 matches

by Sumelic
Thu 30 Nov 2017, 06:18
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ahzoh wrote:
Thu 30 Nov 2017, 05:12
is /s/ > /a/ ever possible like "ism(a)" > "iam(a)"?
With enough sound changes, almost anything is possible. I can imagine something like /isma/ > /iʃma/ > /iʂma/ > /ixma/ > /iχma/ > /iʁma/ > /iɐma/ > /iama/.
by Sumelic
Sat 25 Nov 2017, 23:55
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am trying to think of some interesting ways word order can interact with case/definiteness. If a language is predominantly SOV, would the following be likely: woman.NOM man.ACC saw 'The woman saw a man' VS woman.NOM saw man.ACC 'The woman saw the man' With a definite object appearing after the ve...
by Sumelic
Tue 21 Nov 2017, 20:20
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

@Smtuval: I think hatelangs are a great way to realise that it’s actually quite difficult to find a feature that you continue hating once you get into it and explore its possibilities. That even goes for things that at first glance seem awful, such as the cluster fl (which incidentally is the only ...
by Sumelic
Tue 21 Nov 2017, 08:03
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am thinking about starting a hatelang, like Creyeditor's Omlut... what do people think of such a thing, and what do you think of the first few sentences that I have translated from "the North Wind and the Sun"? north-GEN wind and sun argue-PST-PLR about two he~PLR which more strong. Djbar-b fteef ...
by Sumelic
Sat 18 Nov 2017, 02:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 732
Views: 51685

Re: English Orthography Reform

The English spelling system is perfectly fine. Strange, yes, but perfectly fine. As Xonen says, that's true if you define "perfectly fine" as something like "not entirely unusable", but there are all sorts of fairly obvious ways the spelling of English words could be improved (if we ignore the cost...
by Sumelic
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 20:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In the present day, some generativists seem to be trying to restrict the use of "linguists" I actually think I have to jump in here. It wasn't necessarily the generativists that first started this game. Some earlier paper introduced the terms B-linguists, C-linguists and D-linguists, which in itsel...
by Sumelic
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 18:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

linguisticians It makes me irrationally angry that this word exists. It's "linguists" dammit! [+1] [+1] Seriously, the only reason this word is a "thing" is because laypeople don't know the word "polyglot" exists. I'm not normall one for prescriptivism but misuse of linguistic terminology really in...
by Sumelic
Tue 07 Nov 2017, 22:46
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I firmly believe that Turkish uses <z̧> for /ʒ/ and <j> for /dʒ/, since I refuse to participate in a reality where a major language gets away with using <c> for the latter. The one that always bothers me is Albanian using <x> for /dz/ and <xh> for /dZ/. Even more irritating is that the Bashkimi alp...
by Sumelic
Fri 27 Oct 2017, 23:58
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The Australian languages were the ones I was thinking of initially, but I couldn't remember what restrictions they had. I think it was something to do with the plosives I think many Australian languages, which often have large coronal inventories with things like distinct dental, alveolar, retrofle...
by Sumelic
Tue 24 Oct 2017, 03:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

[Lots of great information...] I think you're right. I think I was trying to just pick things willy-nilly and not really do much in the way of planning out what they will do pr how they will function together. As such, I took some ideas from the questions posed (however not all of them, as the list...
by Sumelic
Fri 20 Oct 2017, 17:29
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

https://i.imgur.com/sbZ25jq.png The above is my current system of Aspects and their markers. However, I am wondering if maybe the progressive and imperfective are not distinct enough or perhaps just seem so due to English not having a distinct imperfective? I'm also wondering if the intensive might...
by Sumelic
Fri 20 Oct 2017, 03:48
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I asked this question years ago , but I don't think I was able to express myself clearly then. To start, I'll explain what led me to my question. In English, speakers occasionally appear to make a verb agree with the final noun in the subject phrase (or maybe the final noun before the verb) rather ...
by Sumelic
Sun 15 Oct 2017, 21:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am wondering what might be some logical synchronic changes for the following? I kind of already do the first one without trying, but is it plausible? Might there be a better option? Anyone have ideas for the last two? For the record, this is for Vingdagese, which has phonology and other phonotact...
by Sumelic
Sun 15 Oct 2017, 16:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

probability tends to defy human logic in some ways; it's extremely improbable for one hundred consecutive coin tosses to all turn up heads (at least assuming an evenly balanced coin, obviously), yet if you've just tossed 99 heads, the chances for the next one are still fifty-fifty (well, roughly; i...
by Sumelic
Wed 11 Oct 2017, 20:58
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Originally the phonemes /w/ and /ʍ/ had their own letters, namely < w > and < ƕ >, or so I understand. I'm afraid not, no. The ƕair ligature was invented around 1900 to transliterate Gothic ƕair (which looks totally different). Neither form of ƕair had been recognised as a letter in English previou...
by Sumelic
Thu 05 Oct 2017, 18:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

How did syllables like /we/, /wi/, /wu/, /je/, and /ji/ all disappear in Japanese. I know it has 'wa, and 'wo' as well as 'ya', 'yo', and 'yu.' Was it something completely random, or was there a reason for it? I'm not sure I understand the question entirely. Is it just based on your knowledge of th...
by Sumelic
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 04:53
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Romanization game
Replies: 3545
Views: 154463

Re: Romanization game

/m n/ <m n> /d t k g ʔ/ <d t k g ɂ> /s z ʃ ʒ h x/ <s z š ž h x> /ts tʃ dz dʒ/ <c č ʒ ǯ> /ɹ j j̊ w ʍ/ <r y yʼ w wʼ> /a ã aː ãː/ <a ą a: ą:> /e ẽ eː ẽː/ <e ę e: ę:> /i ĩ iː ĩː/ <i į i: į:> /o õ oː õː/ <o ǫ o: ǫ:> /u ũ uː ũː/ <u ų u: ų:> Next: /m n̊ n/ /b t d k q/ /tʃ dʒ/ /f s z ɬ x~χ ʁ h/ /w j j̊~ç/ /...
by Sumelic
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 00:10
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Understanding noun class
Replies: 12
Views: 607

Re: Understanding noun class

Typically, in a language analyzed as having noun classes, every specific instance of a noun is analyzed as belonging to some noun class. So one question I would have is, when you say "putko" = "extremity", do you mean it can be used as a stand-alone word to mean "extremity", or is that just the mean...
by Sumelic
Wed 30 Aug 2017, 05:58
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13254
Views: 614421

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

If a language conjugates its verbs for aspect and mood, will it also tend to conjugate for tense. Are there any known natural languages where that conjugate for the aspect and mood, but not the tense. I'm sure there's at least one out there, I'm just not familiar with it. Also, I want a language wi...
by Sumelic
Sat 26 Aug 2017, 03:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6229
Views: 364996

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is there a language that lacks /k/? How about one that lacks [k] even as an allophone? I'm pretty sure the answer is "yes" to both, although I'm not familar with a lot of examples. Probably there is some database that could be searched. My understanding is that there are some particular speech comm...