Search found 796 matches

by Imralu
Sun 18 Feb 2018, 01:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 15
Views: 275

Re: English Dialects

FLEECE [ɪi̯] HappY [ɪ̆i̯] (not really convinced this is anything but a stress distinction) KIT: [ɪ] NEAR - before consonant: [ɪː], finally: [ɪɐ̯], before a vowel [ɪːɹ] DRESS: [ɛ̝] SQUARE: [ɛ̝ː], before a vowel [ɛ̝ːɹ] LAD: [æ] (split of TRAP, containing the word "trap" itself) BAD: [æː] (split of TRA...
by Imralu
Sun 18 Feb 2018, 00:15
Forum: Translations
Topic: Telling the time
Replies: 6
Views: 711

Re: Telling the time

:tan: Swahili Sasa ni saa ngapi? sasa ni saa N-ngapi now COP hour(CL9) CL9-how.much/many What time is it? Sasa ni saa saba. sasa ni saa saba now COP hour(CL9) seven It's one o'clock. Sasa ni saa saba na dakika kumi. sasa ni saa saba na dakika kumi now COP hour(CL9) seven COM minutes(CL10) ten It's t...
by Imralu
Sat 17 Feb 2018, 02:45
Forum: Translations
Topic: Pizza Hut
Replies: 12
Views: 1362

Re: Pizza Hut

:tan: Swahili Tumeweka jibini mahali ambapo hata hujapawazia kamwe. tu-me-wek(a) jibini mahali amba-po hata h-u-ja-pa-waz(a)-i(a) kamwe 1P-PRF-put cheese place(s)(CL16) REL-CL16.REL even NEG-2S-NEG.PRF-CL16-think-APPL never We've put cheese in a place you've never even dreamed of. We've put cheese i...
by Imralu
Sat 17 Feb 2018, 02:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 488
Views: 36212

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Iyionaku wrote:
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 10:33
Wow! Did I just fall for a false friend? [:x]

That HAS to be moved to the False Friends and other unf... oh wait...
Yeah, I was thinking that too. Actually, I'd like to see more structural false friends (as opposed to lexical) here like that ... but I can't think of any others right now.
by Imralu
Sat 17 Feb 2018, 02:07
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13440
Views: 674722

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Turkish is similar to Arabic in that way. There are no initial clusters in native Turkic vocabulary and although final clusters are fairly rare, they do exist, such as in the word türk . Sorry I can't help with the throaty stuff. I can say, however, that the lowering/backing effects of uvulars make ...
by Imralu
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 02:29
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13440
Views: 674722

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Ælfwine wrote:
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 02:10
Strengths
That's only three at the end unless you've got a /k/ in there ... but some people also have a /k/ in "angsts" which brings that up to five.
by Imralu
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 02:24
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13440
Views: 674722

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Also, does anyone know of any languages where coda clusters are allowed to be more complex than onset clusters? You're writing in one. Might I ask for a clarification? I know that you mean English, but I can't think of any words with four coda consonants. "sixths"? I guess I meant to ask if there a...
by Imralu
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 01:59
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 13440
Views: 674722

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

shimobaatar wrote:
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 01:01
Also, does anyone know of any languages where coda clusters are allowed to be more complex than onset clusters?
You're writing in one.
by Imralu
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 01:43
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 488
Views: 36212

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Iyionaku wrote:
Thu 15 Feb 2018, 16:15
Vlürch wrote:
Thu 15 Feb 2018, 12:54
[
Sorry. I'll do my best to not make offensive jokes, and will stop to think before I type shit.
Please, I urge you not to stop to think before you type shit.
stop thinking = aufhören zu denken
stop to think = innehalten, um zu denken
by Imralu
Fri 16 Feb 2018, 01:21
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Language practice thread
Replies: 6129
Views: 318812

Re: Language practice thread

Znex wrote:
Thu 15 Feb 2018, 11:03
Did you get to meet up with your partners or close friends?
Basi, na nani wangu?
With my what now?

Nilifanya kazi nikaenda kwenye kinyozi.
I went to work and went to the hair dressers.
by Imralu
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 18:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 336
Views: 28780

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

Recently a discussion has started about Perfects in Typology again and it seems they are a mixed group, especially if you compare them to perfectives. Just think of universal perfect readings, experiential perfect readings and resultative perfect readings. English seems to group these together, but...
by Imralu
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 18:35
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 336
Views: 28780

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

When you're reading an academic article about TAM marking and you note that some of the author's disagreements with other cited author's analysis look like they're coming down to some people knowing the difference between perfect and perfective and some simply always using "perfective" because it o...
by Imralu
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 07:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 566
Views: 51938

Re: False cognates

:tan: Swahili kama "as", "like"; "if" ... borrowed from Arabic kamaa
:esp: como "as", "like" (and of course cognates in its related languages)
by Imralu
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 07:06
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 566
Views: 51938

Re: False cognates

Yeah, unless you've used a word generator or derived it somehow, either diachronically or by some language-internal means and it's come from something very unlike the natlang word in question language you know (like if jeur came from giol < igola < ik+olna, for example), conlangs are not really a go...
by Imralu
Mon 12 Feb 2018, 06:46
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 336
Views: 28780

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

When you're reading an academic article about TAM marking and you note that some of the author's disagreements with other cited author's analysis look like they're coming down to some people knowing the difference between perfect and perfective and some simply always using "perfective" because it ob...
by Imralu
Sat 10 Feb 2018, 18:48
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 488
Views: 36212

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Thanks for the answers! I'd also say that people more familiar with LGBT+ rights would prefer Outing over Coming-Out for (A) because most new ideas, sources and media are English. Häh? That makes no sense to me. Both of those words are from English and in English, Outing is definitely (B) and Coming...
by Imralu
Sat 10 Feb 2018, 01:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Noun apposition compounds in other languages
Replies: 15
Views: 662

Re: Noun apposition compounds in other languages

Not quite in the scope of your question but it may be interesting to you or anyone who comes here looking for info about this kind of thing: Swahili is pretty unremarkable in basically using "of" between the nouns (although closer associations can simply be NOUN NOUN). The Swahili word for "of", how...
by Imralu
Fri 09 Feb 2018, 22:14
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences
Replies: 488
Views: 36212

Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

:eng: outing - a trip to the countryside :deu: Outing - (homosexual) coming-out Interesting. First, I'd like to point out that the English usage you're referencing is even more specific than that, and carries no connotations, at least for me, regarding the destination. An "outing", for me, is any s...
by Imralu
Fri 09 Feb 2018, 13:14
Forum: Translations
Topic: Loved, mourned and unforgotten
Replies: 12
Views: 722

Re: Loved, mourned and unforgotten

:tan: Swahili

Anapendwa, analiliwa na hasahauliwi.
a-na-pend(a)-w(a) | a-na-li(a)-li(a)-w(a) na h-a-sahau-liw(a)-i
3S-PRES-love-PASS. | 3S-PRES-cry-APPL-PASS COM NEG-3S-forget-PASS-PRES.NEG
(S/he is) loved, cried over and not forgotten.

Swahili has no non-finite participles.
by Imralu
Wed 07 Feb 2018, 12:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: The worst sounding natlang ever
Replies: 233
Views: 12448

Re: The worst sounding natlang ever

I'm going to get a bit retro and go back to the first couple of pages of this thread and jump on the Thai and Vietnamese train. A couple of caveats though: Thai sounds kind of ugly and abrupt to me, but also completely adorably cute. Vietnamese is not cute, but I kind of find it interesting how horr...