Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Diskutiert künstliche Sprachen, Kulturen, Welten, deren Wissenschaften und was auch immer!
Iyionaku
roman
roman
Posts: 1424
Joined: Sun 25 May 2014, 13:17

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Iyionaku » Mon 04 Apr 2016, 07:36

Yes, "daß" is the writing before 1999. Since then, nearly each voiceless /s/ after a short vowel has to be written "ss", while each voiceless /s/ after long vowels and diphtongs is "ß". "das", however, is an exception that occured due to auslautverhärtung. In fact, "dass" and "das" is unsolvable even for many native speakers. As a rule of thumb, you could say it's written "dass" when a new subject comes after it.

Word order is actually not that hard in German. It's basically VSO in interrogative sentences and SOV in subordinate clauses. In affirmative sentences, it has a special word order called V2: The verb always comes at second in a sentence, no matter if the subject, an object, an adverbial construction or a subordinate clause precedes it.

Ich ging gestern in die Stadt, weil ich eine neue Hose brauchte.
In die Stadt ging ich gestern, weil ich eine neue Hose brauchte.
Gestern ging ich in die Stadt, weil ich eine neue Hose brauchte.
Weil ich eine neue Hose brauchte, ging ich gestern in die Stadt.

Ich: Subject, "I"
ging: Verb, "went"
gestern: temporal adverbial, "yesterday"
in die Stadt: local adverbial, "into the city"
Weil ich eine neue Hose brauchte: causal subordinate clause, "because I needed new trousers" (here word order is SOV)

Another remarkable feature is that in German, the temporal adverbial always precedes the local one, while in English it's the other way around.

There is something called "Verbklammer": If a verb is used with auxillary verbs, the main verb is not only in the infinitive like in English, but also goes to the very end of the sentence. "Ich konnte ihn sehen." "Ich habe ihn gesehen" (I could see him. I have seen him.)

If a verb has a prefix that owns primary stress, it is separated from the rest of the verb and goes to the very end of the sentence when it's conjugated, and both parts are separated within one word by the infix "ge" when used in the Partizip II.

Example: from fahren - to drive
umfahren - /umˈfaːrɛn/ to circuit, drive around something, primary stress on the verb stem vs.
umfahren - /'umfaːrɛn/ to knock something down with a car, primary stress on the prefix "um"

So you say: "Ich umfahre den Auerhahn. Ich habe den Auerhahn umfahren. Gib Gas, umfahr ihn!"
"I'm driving around the mountain cock. I drove around the mountain cock. Open up, drive around it!"

But: "Ich fahre den Auerhahn um. Ich habe den Auerhahn umgefahren. Gib Gas, fahr ihn um!"
"I'm knocking down the mountain cock. I knocked down the mountain cock. Open up, knock it down!"

Yes, German is actually that weird. My grandmother, however, used the last sentence I mentioned unintentionally on vacation. My grandfather still laughs about it several times. [xD] EDIT: Just for emphazizing: Neither did we knock down a mountain cock, nor did my grandmother want that. In fact, we didn't even drive around it but were waiting until it went into the forest.

Apart from this, the word order in German is quite free.
Last edited by Iyionaku on Mon 04 Apr 2016, 16:27, edited 1 time in total.
Heaven and Earth, but I feel the color of the cake when you keep the Victoria.
I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


Oh, and there is a [ɕ] in my name!
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 741
Joined: Thu 12 Aug 2010, 01:05

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Tanni » Mon 04 Apr 2016, 09:01

Iyionaku wrote:Yes, "daß" is the writing before 1999.
''Daß'' is the writing still used by many people. The reform came upon us unexpectedly in 1996, even so it was planned to start in 1998.
Since then, nearly each voiceless /s/ after a short vowel has to be written "ss", while each voiceless /s/ after long vowels and diphtongs is "ß". "das", however, is an exception that occured due to auslautverhärtung. In fact, "dass" and "das" is unsolvable even for many native speakers. As a rule of thumb, you could say it's written "dass" when a new subject comes after it.
What you're describing is the so-called ''logical trap''. It leads to many ''overgeneralized'' writings like *Ereigniss or *Zeugniss. ''Daß'' is simply a conjunction introducing a subordinate clause.

go to ss statt ß nach kurzem Vokal
Word order is actually not that hard in German. ...
Go proofread non-native texts ...
There is something called "Verbklammer": If a verb is used with auxillary verbs, the main verb is not only in the infinitive like in English, but also goes to the very end of the sentence. "Ich konnte ihn sehen." "Ich habe ihn gesehen" (I could see him. I have seen him.)
Your first example is just a sentence with the modal verb ''können''.
So you say: "Ich umfahre den Auerhahn. Ich habe den Auerhahn umfahren. Gib Gas, umfahr ihn!"
"I'm driving around the mountain cock. I drove around the mountain cock. Open up, drive around it!"

But: "Ich fahre den Auerhahn um. Ich habe den Auerhahn umgefahren. Gib Gas, fahr ihn um!"
"I'm knocking down the mountain cock. I knocked down the mountain cock. Open up, knock it down!"
This example makes one laught. With your second example, you will get lots of trouble with animal rights activists. Considering the Auerhahn to be relatively small in contrast to a car, you will smash him in either case.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
Lao Kou
korean
korean
Posts: 5471
Joined: Sun 25 Nov 2012, 10:39
Location: 蘇州/苏州

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Lao Kou » Mon 04 Apr 2016, 10:24

Iyionaku wrote:"Ich umfahre den Auerhahn."
"I'm driving around the mountain cock."
I know him. [B)]
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名
User avatar
Omzinesý
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2220
Joined: Fri 27 Aug 2010, 07:17
Location: nowhere [naʊhɪɚ]

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Omzinesý » Sat 14 May 2016, 09:15

Ich stelle die Frage hier, weil niemand sie auf English antwortete.
Warum hat Deutsch <h> nach einigen langen Vokalen, wie sehr, Bahn...? Gibt es ein etymologische Ursach?
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Sat 14 May 2016, 10:00

Also, ich habe mal einige Etymologien nachgeguckt und konnte keine Beispiele finden. Ich könnte mir allerdings vorstellen, dass es eine Übergeneralisierung war.
Edit: Ich habe grade rausgefunden, dass es für Fehde (feud) funktioniert. Das kommt nämlich von mittelhochdeutsch <vehede>
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Iyionaku
roman
roman
Posts: 1424
Joined: Sun 25 May 2014, 13:17

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Iyionaku » Sat 14 May 2016, 17:02

Heaven and Earth, but I feel the color of the cake when you keep the Victoria.
I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


Oh, and there is a [ɕ] in my name!
User avatar
Omzinesý
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2220
Joined: Fri 27 Aug 2010, 07:17
Location: nowhere [naʊhɪɚ]

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Omzinesý » Sun 15 May 2016, 13:26

Danke schön

Mindestens in "gehen" markt <h> /ʔ/ und hat <h> in "geht" auch.
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Sun 15 May 2016, 13:49

Omzinesý wrote:Danke schön

Mindestens Zumindest in "gehen" markiert <h> /ʔ/ und hat <h> in "geht" auch.

Gehen ist entweder [ˈɡeː.ən] oder [ɡeːn]. Ich verstehe den zweiten Teil von deinem Satz nicht, aber geht ist [ɡeːt].
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
User avatar
Omzinesý
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2220
Joined: Fri 27 Aug 2010, 07:17
Location: nowhere [naʊhɪɚ]

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Omzinesý » Sun 15 May 2016, 15:50

Creyeditor wrote:
Omzinesý wrote:Danke schön

Mindestens Zumindest in "gehen" markiert <h> /ʔ/ und hat <h> in "geht" auch.

Gehen ist entweder [ˈɡeː.ən] oder [ɡeːn]. Ich verstehe den zweiten Teil von deinem Satz nicht, aber geht ist [ɡeːt].
Ich sehe dass ich Deutsche weiter üben müsste.

Ich meinte nur dass "geht" mit <h> geschrieben wird, wiel es <h> auch in "gehen" gibt. In "gehen" markt <h> dass es zwei Silben gibt.
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Sun 15 May 2016, 15:59

Omzinesý wrote:
Creyeditor wrote:
Omzinesý wrote:Danke schön

Mindestens Zumindest in "gehen" markiert <h> /ʔ/ und hat <h> in "geht" auch.

Gehen ist entweder [ˈɡeː.ən] oder [ɡeːn]. Ich verstehe den zweiten Teil von deinem Satz nicht, aber geht ist [ɡeːt].
Ich sehe dass ich Deutsche weiter üben müsste.

Ich meinte nur dass "geht" mit <h> geschrieben wird, wiel es <h> auch in "gehen" gibt. In "gehen" markt <h> dass es zwei Silben gibt.
Ja, das mit den Silben stimmt und auch, dass man manchmal aus morphologischen Gründen ein <h> schreibt.
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Iyionaku
roman
roman
Posts: 1424
Joined: Sun 25 May 2014, 13:17

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Iyionaku » Sun 15 May 2016, 19:09

Das h in Wörtern wie "gehen", "sehen", "mähen" etc. hat keine Dehnungsfunktion, sondern dient vor allem als Hiattilger. Man trennt daher auch ge-hen, se-hen, mä-hen und nicht *geh-en, *seh-en, *mäh-en.
Heaven and Earth, but I feel the color of the cake when you keep the Victoria.
I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


Oh, and there is a [ɕ] in my name!
Iyionaku
roman
roman
Posts: 1424
Joined: Sun 25 May 2014, 13:17

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Iyionaku » Sat 04 Jun 2016, 19:39

Ich habe mich gerade über Kopf- und Argumentmarkierung in Possessivphrasen informiert (WALS Kapitel 24) und hatte mich dabei gefragt:

Sind umgangssprachliche Possessivstrukturen wie "meiner Mutter ihr Auto", "meinem Kumpel sein Buch", "meiner Tante ihre Kinder" dann doppelmarkierte Possessivphrasen?

Ich bin mir nämlich überhaupt nicht sicher, ob ich das Prinzip hinter dieser Struktur schon verstanden habe. Danke im Voraus für eure Antworten [:P]
Heaven and Earth, but I feel the color of the cake when you keep the Victoria.
I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


Oh, and there is a [ɕ] in my name!
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Sat 04 Jun 2016, 23:56

Naja, "meine Mutter ihr Auto" ist ja eine ziemlich komplexe Possessorphrase, weil sie ja eigentlich bedeutet (ungrammatisches Beispiel mit Struktur aus meiner Varietät): Auto von Mutter von ich. Also das Auto gehört zu der Mutter, die zu mir gehört. Wenn man aber so etwas hat wie "Papa sein Auto", würde ich sagen, ist das schon doppelt markiert, weil ja sowohl der Possessor im Dativ ist, als auch eine Markierung für das Possessum vorhanden ist, nämlich das Possessivpronomen. Eindeutiger wäre die Struktur, wenn das Possessivpronomen ein Affix am Possessum wäre.

Ich glaube das Deutsch hat eine große Vielfalt an Possessorkonstruktionen, die abhängig von verschiedenen Faktoren sind. Interessant finde ich auch, dass, zumindest für mich, jede einzelne Konstruktion nicht rekursiv ist, sie aber relativ frei miteinander kombiniert werden können.

Hier ein paar Beispiele, die zeigen, dass jede Konstruktion für sich genommen nicht rekursiv ist.
Spoiler:
Omas Auto [tick]
Papas Auto [tick]
Omas Papa [tick]
*Omas Papas Auto [cross]
Das Auto von Oma [tick]
Das Auto von Papa [tick]
Der Papa von Oma [tick]
?Das Auto vom Papa von Oma :?: :?:
Das Auto der Oma [tick]
Das Auto des Papas [tick]
Der Papa der Oma [tick]
*Das Auto des Papas der Oma [cross]
Papa sein Auto [tick]
Oma ihr Auto [tick]
Oma ihr Papa [tick]
*Oma ihrem Papa sein Auto [cross]
Und hier Beispiele, die zeigen sollen, dass die Konstruktionen in ihrer Kombination rekursiv sind. Manche Kombinationen sind aber auch ausgeschlossen.
Spoiler:
Das Auto von Omas Papa. [tick]
Das Auto von Oma ihrem Papa [tick]
Das Auto von dem Papa der Oma [tick]
Das Auto des Papas von Oma [tick]
Omas Papa sein Auto :?:
Dem Papa von Oma sein Auto [tick]
Dem Papa der Oma sein Auto [tick]
Was denkt ihr darüber? Welche Beispiele sind für euch okay? Was kennt ihr noch für Konstruktionen
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 741
Joined: Thu 12 Aug 2010, 01:05

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Tanni » Sun 05 Jun 2016, 14:05

Da wir uns, wie Iyionaku voraussetzt, auf umgangssprachlichem Niveau bewegen, würde ich alle Beispiele aus dem ersten Spoiler als mehr oder weniger akzeptabel ansehen.

Natürlich sind Possessivkonstruktionen im Deutschen rekursiv: der Kern des Apfels des Baumes, das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau, die Farbe des Bandes der Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau etc.

Bei ''double marking'' geht es darum, daß beide, Besitzer und Besitz, in bezug auf die ''Besitzrelation'' markiert sind.
Dies ist z. B. im Türkischen durch die Markierung mit Genitiv und Possessiv der Fall, nicht aber im Deutschen.
In einer Sprache mit Kasus kann die gesamte Konstruktion (z. B. der Apfel des Baumes) natürlich auch noch in einem anderen Kasus als den Nominativ stehen (z. B. einen Apfel des Baumes -- Ich gab dem Kind einen Apfel des Baumes).
Im gegebenen Beispiel ist jedoch der Genitiv selbst doppelt markiert durch den Artikel ''des'' und das Suffix -es an ''Baum''.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Sun 05 Jun 2016, 17:43

Tanni wrote:Natürlich sind Possessivkonstruktionen im Deutschen rekursiv: der Kern des Apfels des Baumes, das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau, die Farbe des Bandes der Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau etc.
Interessant. All diese Beispiele sind für mich nicht möglich [:D] Ich wüsste auch gar nicht wie die Betonung sein sollte.
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 741
Joined: Thu 12 Aug 2010, 01:05

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Tanni » Mon 06 Jun 2016, 09:18

Creyeditor wrote:
Tanni wrote:Natürlich sind Possessivkonstruktionen im Deutschen rekursiv: der Kern des Apfels des Baumes, das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau, die Farbe des Bandes der Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau etc.
Interessant. All diese Beispiele sind für mich nicht möglich [:D] Ich wüsste auch gar nicht wie die Betonung sein sollte.
Wieso sollte das nicht möglich sein? Wenn man beliebig lange Komposita bilden kann, dann muß man sie auch in Possessivkonstruktionen auflösen können. Das ist natürlich kein guter Stil, und man verliert schnell die Übersicht.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Mon 06 Jun 2016, 11:08

Naja, ich scheine mit der Einschätzung nicht alleine zu sein (s. Everett 2007, S. 9), du allerdings auch nicht, obwohl ich denke, dass die meistens Nicht-Muttersprachler noch weniger davon verstehen. Für mich klingt es falsch und ich würde es selbst nie so sagen. Ich kann es natürlich verstehen, aber ich würde es nie selbst so produzieren können, obwohl es nach der Duden-Grammaik wahrscheinlich geht.
Rekursive Komposita gehen für mich übrigens und mit denen kann ich auch die Genitivkonstruktionen auflösen (wobei ich nicht genau weiß, was ein Baumapfel ist). Also wieder mein persönliches Gefühl:

*der Kern des Apfels des Baums [cross]
der Kern des Baumapfels [tick]
der Apfelkern des Baums [tick]
der Baumapfelkern [tick]
*das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
*das Kerngehäuse des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
das Kerngehäuse des Baumapfels [tick]
*die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau [cross]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau :?: :?:
Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitäne [tick]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitänsgesellschaft [tick]
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 741
Joined: Thu 12 Aug 2010, 01:05

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Tanni » Mon 06 Jun 2016, 11:47

Creyeditor wrote:Naja, ich scheine mit der Einschätzung nicht alleine zu sein (s. Everett 2007, S. 9), du allerdings auch nicht, obwohl ich denke, dass die meistens Nicht-Muttersprachler noch weniger davon verstehen. Für mich klingt es falsch und ich würde es selbst nie so sagen. Ich kann es natürlich verstehen, aber ich würde es nie selbst so produzieren können, obwohl es nach der Duden-Grammaik wahrscheinlich geht.
Was meinst Du hier mit ''es''. Mir liegt Everett 2007 nicht vor. Kannst Du die entsprechende Passage zitieren? Ich gehe hier nach meinem eigenen Sprachgefühl, nicht nach Duden-Grammatik.
Rekursive Komposita gehen für mich übrigens und mit denen kann ich auch die Genitivkonstruktionen auflösen (wobei ich nicht genau weiß, was ein Baumapfel ist).
Du sprichst von ''rekursiven Komposita''. Das legt nahe, daß es vielleicht auch nichtrekursive Komposita gibt. Letztlich ist jedes Kompositum rekursiv bzw. iterativ, da es ja aus einer Reihe von Wörtern besteht. Den Begriff ''rekursiv'' würde ich benutzen, wenn es in der Diskussion darauf ankäme, daß ein oder mehrere Konstituenten des Kompositums selbst schon Komposita wären. Rekursiv ist der allgemeinere Begriff, Iteration ein Sonderfall. In der Informatik kann man Endrekursion durch Iteration ersetzen.
Also wieder mein persönliches Gefühl:

*der Kern des Apfels des Baums [cross]
der Kern des Baumapfels [tick]
der Apfelkern des Baums [tick]
der Baumapfelkern [tick]
*das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
*das Kerngehäuse des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
das Kerngehäuse des Baumapfels [tick]
*die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau [cross]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau :?: :?:
Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitäne [tick]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitänsgesellschaft [tick]
Wir befinden uns hier auf umgangssprachlichem Niveau, wie Iyionaku vorausgesetzt hat. Da geht natürlich mehr als auf dem Niveau der Standardsprache. Natürlich machen nicht alle Möglichkeiten Sinn, aber vom Prinzip her ist Rekursion natürlich immer möglich.

Der Kern des Apfels des Baums, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz. Alternativ ginge hier auch:
Der Kern des Apfels von dem Baum, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz.

Die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Donau-Flußschiffkapitäne, von dem ich vorhin erzählte, wurde wiedergefunden.

Das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, den Gott Adam und Eva verboten hatte, war verschimmelt.
Besser wäre hier natürlich ''das Kerngehäuse''.

Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze klingt zuerst komisch, es könnte aber sein, daß es eine extra Kapitänsmütze für gesellschaftliche Empfänge für Donauflußschiffahrtskapitäne gibt, im Gegensatz zur Kapitänsmütze, die während der Arbeit getragen wird. Gehört vielleicht zur Ausgehuniform.

Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau ist blau.

Die Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau -- im Gegensatz zu der des Rheins -- schreibt blaue Kapitänsmützen mit goldenen Verzierungen vor.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3896
Joined: Tue 14 Aug 2012, 18:32

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Creyeditor » Mon 06 Jun 2016, 14:50

Tanni wrote:
Creyeditor wrote:Naja, ich scheine mit der Einschätzung nicht alleine zu sein (s. Everett 2007, S. 9), du allerdings auch nicht, obwohl ich denke, dass die meistens Nicht-Muttersprachler noch weniger davon verstehen. Für mich klingt es falsch und ich würde es selbst nie so sagen. Ich kann es natürlich verstehen, aber ich würde es nie selbst so produzieren können, obwohl es nach der Duden-Grammaik wahrscheinlich geht.
Was meinst Du hier mit ''es''. Mir liegt Everett 2007 nicht vor. Kannst Du die entsprechende Passage zitieren? Ich gehe hier nach meinem eigenen Sprachgefühl, nicht nach Duden-Grammatik.
Everett selbst zitiert aus Nevins et al. (2007):
"To pick an example of particular relevance to Pirahã, we can note that English allows prenominal possessive noun phrases to embed other possessives — but German does not (Krause (2000a, 2000b)); Roeper and Snyder (2005)). As Roeper and Snyder put it: "the English possessive is potentially recursive [(3a)], while the Saxon genitive [its counterpart in German] is not [(3b)]" (compare (4a-b)): "
(3) a. John's car (English)
b. Hans-ens Auto (German)
(4) a. [John's car's] motor (English)
b. *[Hans-ens Auto]-s Motor (German)
Since a German speaker can do the "Mary thinks that... trick" as well as an English speaker can, no one could rationally imagine (even if so inclined) that the unacceptability of recursion in prenominal possessors is due to some global absence of recursion in German. Likewise, we imagine that that it is beyond dispute that the culture of the German-speaking regions of Europe allows for creation myths, artwork, counting and discourse not bound to the "here and now". It thus seems unlikely that one would attribute the absence of recursive prenominal possessors to any pattern of cultural gaps like that claimed by Everett for the Pirahã. Instead, there must be some provision available to human languages (usually called a "parameter") that "turns off" the possibility of recursion within possessive phrases. The switch itself might be fairly abstract in nature."
Everett antwortet mit einem Zitat von Krifka, der ungefähr das Gegenteil behauptet:
"I don't think that German prenominal possessives are not recursive. We find, for example, many examples of the phrase seines Bruders Hüter on the Web (not only as the title of a German translation of a book of Stanislaus Joyce's book about his brother James Joyce). In addition, we also find examples like Peters Bruders Harley (http://www.tautoo.de/galerie.html), Peters Vaters Auto (http://www.itparcados.net/leben/human.faces2000db.html), Peters Mutters Auto (http://myblog.de/rene.ueber.alles). It is true that examples like ??Peters Autos Motor is quite bad, but this seems to be due to the fact that prenominal genitives are restricted to names and kinship terms in contemporary German (?des Lehrers Auto)."
Außerdem gibt Everett ein paar Beispiele aus dem Web, die ich persönlich ziemlich scheußlich finde: "von den vater von meine frau; der Liedertext von Die Mutter von James Bond von Elsterglanz; zur lage von die sprache von Peter Kohler"
Rekursive Komposita gehen für mich übrigens und mit denen kann ich auch die Genitivkonstruktionen auflösen (wobei ich nicht genau weiß, was ein Baumapfel ist).
Du sprichst von ''rekursiven Komposita''. Das legt nahe, daß es vielleicht auch nichtrekursive Komposita gibt. Letztlich ist jedes Kompositum rekursiv bzw. iterativ, da es ja aus einer Reihe von Wörtern besteht. Den Begriff ''rekursiv'' würde ich benutzen, wenn es in der Diskussion darauf ankäme, daß ein oder mehrere Konstituenten des Kompositums selbst schon Komposita wären. Rekursiv ist der allgemeinere Begriff, Iteration ein Sonderfall. In der Informatik kann man Endrekursion durch Iteration ersetzen.
Also ich meinte Rekursion im Sinne von einer Regel, die ihren eigenen Output als Input genommen hat. "Baumapfel" hat aus zwei Nomen ein Kompositum gemacht, während "Baumapfelkern" aus "Baumapfel", was selbst ein Kompositum ist, und "Kern" ein Kompositum gemacht hat, also ein rekursives Kompositum ist.
Also wieder mein persönliches Gefühl:

*der Kern des Apfels des Baums [cross]
der Kern des Baumapfels [tick]
der Apfelkern des Baums [tick]
der Baumapfelkern [tick]
*das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
*das Kerngehäuse des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
das Kerngehäuse des Baumapfels [tick]
*die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau [cross]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau :?: :?:
Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitäne [tick]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitänsgesellschaft [tick]
Wir befinden uns hier auf umgangssprachlichem Niveau, wie Iyionaku vorausgesetzt hat. Da geht natürlich mehr als auf dem Niveau der Standardsprache. Natürlich machen nicht alle Möglichkeiten Sinn, aber vom Prinzip her ist Rekursion natürlich immer möglich.

Der Kern des Apfels des Baums, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz. Alternativ ginge hier auch:
Der Kern des Apfels von dem Baum, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz.

Die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Donau-Flußschiffkapitäne, von dem ich vorhin erzählte, wurde wiedergefunden.

Das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, den Gott Adam und Eva verboten hatte, war verschimmelt.
Besser wäre hier natürlich ''das Kerngehäuse''.

Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze klingt zuerst komisch, es könnte aber sein, daß es eine extra Kapitänsmütze für gesellschaftliche Empfänge für Donauflußschiffahrtskapitäne gibt, im Gegensatz zur Kapitänsmütze, die während der Arbeit getragen wird. Gehört vielleicht zur Ausgehuniform.

Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau ist blau.

Die Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau -- im Gegensatz zu der des Rheins -- schreibt blaue Kapitänsmützen mit goldenen Verzierungen vor.
Ich muss sagen, dass die rekursiven Possessivkontruktionen für mich immer noch nicht funktionieren, auch nicht in ganzen Sätzen. Interessant, vielleicht ist das dialektabhängig.
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :fra: 4 :esp: 4 :ind:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 741
Joined: Thu 12 Aug 2010, 01:05

Re: Fragen über Deutsch - Questions about German

Post by Tanni » Mon 06 Jun 2016, 16:57

Creyeditor wrote:
Tanni wrote:
Creyeditor wrote:Naja, ich scheine mit der Einschätzung nicht alleine zu sein (s. Everett 2007, S. 9), du allerdings auch nicht, obwohl ich denke, dass die meistens Nicht-Muttersprachler noch weniger davon verstehen. Für mich klingt es falsch und ich würde es selbst nie so sagen. Ich kann es natürlich verstehen, aber ich würde es nie selbst so produzieren können, obwohl es nach der Duden-Grammaik wahrscheinlich geht.
Was meinst Du hier mit ''es''. Mir liegt Everett 2007 nicht vor. Kannst Du die entsprechende Passage zitieren? Ich gehe hier nach meinem eigenen Sprachgefühl, nicht nach Duden-Grammatik.
Everett selbst zitiert aus Nevins et al. (2007):
"To pick an example of particular relevance to Pirahã, we can note that English allows prenominal possessive noun phrases to embed other possessives — but German does not (Krause (2000a, 2000b)); Roeper and Snyder (2005)). As Roeper and Snyder put it: "the English possessive is potentially recursive [(3a)], while the Saxon genitive [its counterpart in German] is not [(3b)]" (compare (4a-b)): "
(3) a. John's car (English)
b. Hans-ens Auto (German)
(4) a. [John's car's] motor (English)
b. *[Hans-ens Auto]-s Motor (German)
Since a German speaker can do the "Mary thinks that... trick" as well as an English speaker can, no one could rationally imagine (even if so inclined) that the unacceptability of recursion in prenominal possessors is due to some global absence of recursion in German. Likewise, we imagine that that it is beyond dispute that the culture of the German-speaking regions of Europe allows for creation myths, artwork, counting and discourse not bound to the "here and now". It thus seems unlikely that one would attribute the absence of recursive prenominal possessors to any pattern of cultural gaps like that claimed by Everett for the Pirahã. Instead, there must be some provision available to human languages (usually called a "parameter") that "turns off" the possibility of recursion within possessive phrases. The switch itself might be fairly abstract in nature."
Everett antwortet mit einem Zitat von Krifka, der ungefähr das Gegenteil behauptet:
"I don't think that German prenominal possessives are not recursive. We find, for example, many examples of the phrase seines Bruders Hüter on the Web (not only as the title of a German translation of a book of Stanislaus Joyce's book about his brother James Joyce). In addition, we also find examples like Peters Bruders Harley (http://www.tautoo.de/galerie.html), Peters Vaters Auto (http://www.itparcados.net/leben/human.faces2000db.html), Peters Mutters Auto (http://myblog.de/rene.ueber.alles). It is true that examples like ??Peters Autos Motor is quite bad, but this seems to be due to the fact that prenominal genitives are restricted to names and kinship terms in contemporary German (?des Lehrers Auto)."
Außerdem gibt Everett ein paar Beispiele aus dem Web, die ich persönlich ziemlich scheußlich finde: "von den vater von meine frau; der Liedertext von Die Mutter von James Bond von Elsterglanz; zur lage von die sprache von Peter Kohler"
Rekursive Komposita gehen für mich übrigens und mit denen kann ich auch die Genitivkonstruktionen auflösen (wobei ich nicht genau weiß, was ein Baumapfel ist).
Du sprichst von ''rekursiven Komposita''. Das legt nahe, daß es vielleicht auch nichtrekursive Komposita gibt. Letztlich ist jedes Kompositum rekursiv bzw. iterativ, da es ja aus einer Reihe von Wörtern besteht. Den Begriff ''rekursiv'' würde ich benutzen, wenn es in der Diskussion darauf ankäme, daß ein oder mehrere Konstituenten des Kompositums selbst schon Komposita wären. Rekursiv ist der allgemeinere Begriff, Iteration ein Sonderfall. In der Informatik kann man Endrekursion durch Iteration ersetzen.
Also ich meinte Rekursion im Sinne von einer Regel, die ihren eigenen Output als Input genommen hat. "Baumapfel" hat aus zwei Nomen ein Kompositum gemacht, während "Baumapfelkern" aus "Baumapfel", was selbst ein Kompositum ist, und "Kern" ein Kompositum gemacht hat, also ein rekursives Kompositum ist.
Also wieder mein persönliches Gefühl:

*der Kern des Apfels des Baums [cross]
der Kern des Baumapfels [tick]
der Apfelkern des Baums [tick]
der Baumapfelkern [tick]
*das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
*das Kerngehäuse des Apfels des Baumes [cross]
das Kerngehäuse des Baumapfels [tick]
*die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau [cross]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau :?: :?:
Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitäne [tick]
Die Kapitänsmütze der Donauflussschiffkapitänsgesellschaft [tick]
Wir befinden uns hier auf umgangssprachlichem Niveau, wie Iyionaku vorausgesetzt hat. Da geht natürlich mehr als auf dem Niveau der Standardsprache. Natürlich machen nicht alle Möglichkeiten Sinn, aber vom Prinzip her ist Rekursion natürlich immer möglich.

Der Kern des Apfels des Baums, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz. Alternativ ginge hier auch:
Der Kern des Apfels von dem Baum, von dem ich vorhin sprach, war schwarz.

Die Mütze des Kapitäns der Gesellschaft der Donau-Flußschiffkapitäne, von dem ich vorhin erzählte, wurde wiedergefunden.

Das Gehäuse der Kerne des Apfels des Baumes, den Gott Adam und Eva verboten hatte, war verschimmelt.
Besser wäre hier natürlich ''das Kerngehäuse''.

Die Gesellschaftskapitänsmütze klingt zuerst komisch, es könnte aber sein, daß es eine extra Kapitänsmütze für gesellschaftliche Empfänge für Donauflußschiffahrtskapitäne gibt, im Gegensatz zur Kapitänsmütze, die während der Arbeit getragen wird. Gehört vielleicht zur Ausgehuniform.

Die Kapitänsmütze der Gesellschaft der Flussschiffkapitäne der Donau ist blau.

Die Gesellschaft der Flußschiffkapitäne der Donau -- im Gegensatz zu der des Rheins -- schreibt blaue Kapitänsmützen mit goldenen Verzierungen vor.
Ich muss sagen, dass die rekursiven Possessivkontruktionen für mich immer noch nicht funktionieren, auch nicht in ganzen Sätzen. Interessant, vielleicht ist das dialektabhängig.
Denke nicht, daß das dialektabhängig ist, es sei denn, Du siehst das Hochdeutsche als einen Dialekt an. Den Dialekt meiner Eltern sollte ich nicht lernen, und den aus meinem Dorf beherrsche ich nicht wirklich.
Nevins et al. (2007) wrote:no one could rationally imagine (even if so inclined) that the unacceptability of recursion in prenominal possessors is due to some global absence of recursion in German.
... niemand kann sich vernünftigerweise vorstellen, daß die Nicht-Akzeptanz der Rekursion in pränominalen Possessors wegen eines globalen Fehlens von Rekursion in Deutsch ist.

Diese Art von Aussagen (doppelte Negation) ist häufig Grund für Mißverständnisse.
Everett zitiert Krifka wrote:I don't think that German prenominal possessives are not recursive.
Ich denke nicht, daß deutsche pränominale Possesive nicht rekursiv sind. => deutsche pränominale Possessive sind rekursiv!

Es geht hier offenbar um pränominale Possessive, in meinen Beispielen sind die durch Genitiv markierten Komponenten jedoch postnominal. Ich dachte, es ginge Dir nur um die Rekursion, nicht darum, wo -- relativ zum Bezugswort -- die Rekursion stattfindet. Ich denke, daß umgangssprachlich mehr möglich ist als in der Hochsprache und daß die zitierten Autoren sich auf diese beziehen. Allerdings gibt es auch literarische Beispiele für vorangestellte Possessive:
Otfried Preußler, Räuber Hotzenplotz, aus dem Gedächtnis zitiert wrote: Herbei, herbei, wo immer er sei,
des Hutes Besitzer, er stelle sich ein
wo der Hut ist, da soll er selber sein.
Hier ist ''des Hutes Besitzer'' durch die Voranstellung ziemlich markiert, wenn man sowas aber ein paarmal liest, dann kommt es einen gar nicht mehr so fremdartig vor. Auf diese Weise könnte jeder Sprache ihre syntaktische Ausdrucksfähigkeit erweitern. Und im Türkischen ist das die einzig mögliche Stellung. Das Deutsche ist eine Sprache, die in vielerlei Hinsicht sich nicht für eine einzige Möglichkeit entscheidet.
Außerdem gibt Everett ein paar Beispiele aus dem Web, die ich persönlich ziemlich scheußlich finde: "von den vater von meine frau; der Liedertext von Die Mutter von James Bond von Elsterglanz; zur lage von die sprache von Peter Kohler"
Bist Du sicher, daß das wirklich so gesagt/geschrieben wurde? Müßte es nicht eher "von dem Vater von meiner Frau" heißen? Vielleicht findest Du es ja deshalb scheußlich? Etwas besser ausgedrückt ergäbe das dann "vom Vater von meiner Frau" und "vom Vater meiner Frau", was dann doch besser klingt. Das ist aber kein pränominaler Possessiv, da Vater das Bezugswort ist, das im Dativ steht.
Für "Die Mutter von James Bond" kann man auch "James Bonds Mutter" schreiben, aber heute umgehen viele Leute diese Genitiv-Konstruktion. Dies mag auch daher kommen, daß die Leute unsicher werden, wenn das Bestimmungswort mit einem s-Laut endet.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
Post Reply