Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

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Salmoneus
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Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Thu 13 Jul 2017, 12:50

The Wenthar Islands are few people’s idea of the ideal holiday destination. They’re wet, windy, and rarely all that warm, with little in the way of country homes, cathedrals or castles, and even fewer broad sandy beaches. Yet surprisingly, these isolated little rocks off the west coast of Europe make much of their money from the tourist industry, and the Wenthars make for a rich, unexpected treat for the more discerning holidaymaker. Here are eight reasons to visit...

1. The joy of the scramble
The Wenthars have few natural resources, but one thing they do have in abundance is rock. And what is rock good for? Rock climbing! The inexperienced may wish to begin with gill-scrambling, a fun, wet march up one of the island’s countless small, rocky streambeds. Those seeking a bigger challenge can move on to climbing the ubiquitous cliffa, outcroppings of (mostly) granite that jag out of the land randomly, like teeth from old gums (some are pure tors, while others have one gentler, grassy slope). Only the tallest cliffa are more than fifty metres in height, but they provide a large supply of new and interesting climbing routes within reach of almost all settlements on the islands. The pinnacle of this sort of climbing is to be found on Fjallhaugh, on the island of Northøy. At over 600m, Fjallhaugh is the second-tallest mountain on the islands (if Cnogmeri is treated as only a secondary peak of Crestesrock), but is more accurately seen as large, geologically-jumbled plateau deeply scored with gullies and peppered with rock stacks. The mountain is a national park and only a limited number of visitors are permitted in each season, but visitors can enjoy not only the pleasures of a dozen cliff faces but also a remarkable, misty microbiome of dense mosses and jungle-like ferns.

More serious climbers may turn to the larger granite mountains, most of which are sited in northern Northøy, or on smaller islands even further north. Most enticing of all, and yet most dangerous, is Crestesrock. Only a mile or so west of Fjallhaugh, Crestesrock is a steep-sided pyramid of granite, around 700m in total height (and around 550 above the surrounding land), with a slightly lower peak, Cnogmeri, a few hundred metres to the north. It has attracted, and frequently killed, climbers since the late Victorian era, and as a result has gained a morbid but glorious reputation in the climbing fraternity. Climbers have died falling on the ascent, falling on the descent, of exposure (trapped on the mountain in a storm), and, on several occasions, of lightning strikes on or near the summit. As regards technical difficulty, the Crestesrock routes vary from the robust to the extremely difficult – in particular, the much of the east face is effectively a sheer and vertical cliff – but the danger and effective difficulty of the climb do not come purely from the rock itself. It is, in that regard, an ‘easier’ climb than some comparably iconic rock faces. The danger instead comes from the conditions: it rains on Crestesrock more than half the days in the year, and the winds reach gale force even at the base of the mountain on one day in three. At the summit, winds are gale force on all but the calmest days, and wind speeds are believed to exceed 200mph in winter storms. In addition to gales, rain, frequent lightning strikes and in winter sleet, snow, ice and hail, the rock is also often speckled with slippery guano, thanks to the local bird colonies. As a result, ascent attempts are only permitted in fine conditions, and only for highly experienced climbers; nonetheless, the east face of Crestesrock has become a bucket-list item for climbing fanatics.

Those for whom Crestesrock just doesn’t seem dangerous enough can attempt the various sea cliffs, or brinka, dotted around the islands. None are particularly tall, but hydraulic undercutting makes them more technical, and the unpredictable high waters make most of them perilous ascents. However, one particular cliff, the 20m Siybrink (victory rock), in northern Walløy, is relatively safe to climb due to its position on the sheltered Innelaugh bay, and is a regular tourist destination. Those seeking something easier and more controlled, however, may prefer to book some time at one of the many indoor climbing centres across the country.

Thanks to the natural terrain, rock-climbing has become a significant sport in the Wenthars, and many notable climbers and mountaineers hail from the islands – many, at least, in proportion to the size of the population.




2. The wild (and not so wild) outdoors

The Wenthars are not known for their wilderness – most of the land is under some form of agricultural occupation. But the towns are small, and the population mostly rural, and both the weather (rain, wind, rain, fog, wind and rain) and the ecology give a much wilder, more ‘natural’ feel to the place. The result is a country filled with gentle, achievable country walks within reassuring reach of civilisation, yet that nonetheless give a satisfying sense of contact with (rather wet) nature.

The main destination for those interested in walking is Rockalbørgh, in the shadow of Crestesrock on the large, hilly, less populous island of Northøy, from where the lush moss and ferns of Fjallhaugh are easily accessible (in organised walking tours). More serious travellers can take boat from Northøy to sparsely-settled, even hillier northern Walløy, or to the smaller northern islands – or they may cross the Thyrhals, a lush if slightly boggy valley, into the hills of northern Langlað. On the larger Meynlað to the south, meanwhile, the walker is closer to habitation, but can still plot a satisfying path through emerald pastureland (struck through with dry stone walls and pebble tracks), lush crop fields, and sheep-shortened peat bogs, via the occasional lake and fen. Perhaps the most beautiful scenary is to be found in the coastal machairs, bursting with meadowflowers, sporadically located around the islands, with the largest stretch on the west coast of Langlað, north of the third-largest city, Halsbørgh.

Those who prefer forests will have a harder time finding destinations – but will be amply rewarded for their efforts. The temperate climate and constant rain produce stunning temperate rainforests filled with moss, lichen and ferns. Visitors based in Rockalbørgh should investigate not only the heights of Fjallhaugh (where the terrain is too steep to support large tree forests, but there is substantial other vegetation), but also the Elskóga, the alder forest of northern Langláð that perch on the steep slopes above the Elsbrinka cliffs. The largest expanses of woodland lie in the less populated islands of South Wenthar (head to the “city” of Dinnkjirkj) – the surviving forests are mostly on unpopulated or sparsely-populated small islands, but several of these are large enough for a pleasant day out.

The most magical of the country’s woodlands, however (both aesthetically and mythologically) is the Elfcadwalt of the island of Cádlað, south of Meynlað, and the encircled eyot of Elfclaðoch (where an invisible stairway may, it is said, be found, to lead the traveller into Elflað, only to return decades or centuries later). Unlike the country’s other woodlands – unlike almost any forest on Earth – the Elfcadwalt is a temperate yew rainforest, over a predominantly limestone bedrock (which in places breaks out into outcroppings of mossy karst). It is said to be one of the most beautiful places in Europe, if not the world. Those seeking a less comfortable beauty, however, may trek north out of the Elfcadwalt, through the heather, onto the Dweorghfjall, a boggy, foggy upland speckled with mysterious (allegedly dwarf-hewn) miniature towers of rock, and assemblies of large boulders balanced upon one another precariously by ungodly forces. Don’t stray from the path, if you don’t want to fall down a pit into Dweorghlað below – or, more prosaically, if you don’t want to get trapped in a dangerous quagmire!




3. The birds, the birds!
To say that the Wenthars are good for bird-watching is to commit a criminal understatement. The terrestrial native birds include several species unique to the islands – such as the Wenthar blue-winged magpie – and the remoter islands are home to the world’s only surviving breeding populations of the penguin-like Great Auk. Those potential lifers are supplemented by a steady stream of seasonal migrants, from geese to swallows. But above all, this is a country of seabirds. With no land for hundreds of miles in any direction, but rich fishing waters all around, the islands are a paradise for every kind of seabird found in the North Atlantic region. The largest colonies, of course, are found on small skerries only accessible by boat (while you’re aboard, look out for the whales, dolphins, and seals), but even on the largest islands there are raucous colonies of birds on sea cliffs, outcrops, tall buildings...
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Thu 13 Jul 2017, 23:52

4. The sweat and tears of sporting life

The national sport of the Wenthars is, as it is almost everywhere in the world, football. For men, at least – women are more likely to play handball or camogie. Indeed, among spectators the women’s sports are more popular – largely because any footballer of any talent plays abroad. So too do the best handball and hockey players, but with less financial draw, these sports are able to retain more of their players in their local teams. As a result, handball and camogie are mostly watched in person at local grounds, while football is mostly watched on TV. None of these sports see particular national success, although the national camogie team does sometimes compete in the All-Ireland. The national hurling team is rather less notable, but it’s still a popular pastime for the young.

In fact, few sporting figures from the Wenthars have had much success of any kind, but that doesn’t deter the populace; the local culture strongly emphasises physical prowess, and amateur sport is popular. Other sports in which the Wenthars have a (very small) degree of competitive success include shooting, climbing, ocean rowing, and equestrian sport (although horses were only introduced en masse to the islands a few centuries ago, they quickly became popular and horseback travel is still widely employed); on the more intellectual side, the islands have a strong tradition of strategy games – native cynigstafl is most popular, but there are also flourishing clubs for chess, Go, and Bridge.

Particular events worth attending for tourists include the national handball and camogie finals, the national indoor climbing championships (held in perhaps the world’s greatest indoor climbing stadium), the horse championships (featuring racing, show-jumping, dressage, plowing, and horse-vaulting), and the national automobile championships. These, held at the famous Grǫnnhyll track (a restored former airstrip, featuring several striking WWII-era fortifications in the background) feature an international professional touring car race and a variety of events for local car and motorbike enthusiasts, as well as a vintage car festival. It may not be Le Mans, but it’s a fun day out – though perhaps not as exhilerating as a Grǫnnhyll track day. Considered too dangerous a track for the fastest modern cars, with its long straight and its undulating curves (several of which can become jumps at too high a speed) it’s widely regarded as one of the world’s best tracks for the thrill-seeking amateur.

The athletic soul of the nation, however, lies in wrestling, which may not have the mass participation of football, but has many times its prestige and mythic significance. Wrestling champions for individual villages have been recorded (with varying degrees of reliability) in some cases into the first millennium, and the national championships have been recorded since the 15th century. Many of the islands’ myths – from St. Finnløgh wrestling with King Wóða, to St. Thruðha wrestling with the boar and St. Àrkenfriðe wrestling with Lady Rąnn – revolve around wrestling, and wrestling iconography is seen frequently. Freestyle wrestling and, in recent years, MMA have followings on the islands, and a number of minor international figures have been produced; but above all, wrestling in the Wenthars means wrasseling (as distinct from general griep’ling, any form of unarmed, non-striking fighting). In wrasseling, competitors, who wear only shorts with a thick rope belt, stand chest-to-chest, and grasp a coloured section of their opponant’s rope belt, behind their back, with at least one hand at all times. The players attempt to throw their opponant to the ground, or out of the ring; limited striking (of the palm or back of the hand against a limb) is also permitted, as are tripping, and pushing the back. In addition to traditional, semi-professional bráðwrasseling (torch wrestling, so called as it is conducted outdoors at night, under burning torches), there are also professional and amateur competitive structures for several other formats of the sport, including frystfall (long bouts to the first throw), twelfrund (up to twelve short rounds, scored round-by-round), fivrund (four or in some circumstances five mid-length rounds) and annrund (single short rounds against a series of opponants in close succession). Competition takes place in numerous weight catagories, and with distinct classes for men, unmarried women, and married women. Tourists may particularly want to observe an annrund evening, for its variety and high level of action, and if possible (it won’t be!) to get a ticket for the annual bráðwrasseling sijkenignącht, as much an all-night festival as a sporting occasion.

Of course, many tourists will already have seen a little wrasseling. The sport enjoyed a huge boom in international popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, particularly in the unmarried female annrund competitions. Women’s wrasseling, like men’s, is conducted topless, and (other than in frystfall) on a muddy surface while slicked (for tactical reasons) in oil; why this obscure sport may have attracted international attention (typically through late-night broadcasts on satellite and cable channels) is something of a mystery. Tourists hoping for the same sporting (and gambling) pleasures in the Wenthars, however, may be disappointed: unmarried women’s matches, while televised, can only be watched in person by other unmarried women.
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Lambuzhao » Fri 14 Jul 2017, 14:36

Though Fjallhaugh sounds really great, I'm holding out for reason #7.
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Fri 14 Jul 2017, 22:15

5. Soak up the culture

National pride – pride not in a country, but in a cultural nation – has long been central to Wenthar politics, and it should come as no surprise that traditional culture remains vibrant on the islands. National dress – largely unisex aside from head coverings, emphasising tweed and linen, and particularly distinctive for its flared sleeves and its cloaks – remains the default clothing outside of formal business meetings. The architecture is likewise distinctive, with many buildings constructed of dry stone walls (or a simulacrum of such). Traditional ornamentation styles, favouring light knotwork of plants and animals, is still widely seen. Traditional song and dance performances draw crowds of both tourists and locals.

And then there’s the cuisine. It’s fair to say Wenthar food is not particularly exciting – bread (most often either wholewheat soda rolls or rye flatbread) is the staple food, typically served with fresh, smoked or salted fish, beans, and root vegetables, with occasional chicken and cured pork, although mutton or beef may be eaten on special occasions. The islands do produce a number of interesting cheeses, mostly produced from sheep milk. Visitors tend to find the local food inoffensive but monotonous.

Wenthar’s beverages, however, merit much more attention, if not undivided support from casual drinkers. Wenthar beer is traditionally made primarily from rye, smoked over peat, top-fermented, bittered with bayberry-based gruits, and lagered; as the world’s largest producer of rye beer, of gruit beer, and of smoked beer, the islands are a must-visit destination for serious beer connoisseurs – although many visitors may find the unexpected flavours challenging. Until recently, beer production in the islands was extremely localised, with as many different beers – largely differentiated by local secret gruit recipes – as there were villages. In the last two decades, with increasing international trade, a number of larger breweries have been founded for the export market, and enterprising brewers are experimenting widely with other, more conventional, methods. The country also produces spirits (through a state-owned monopoly), chiefly the native acwavit, a crisp, mildly bitter spirit flavoured with a mixture of herbs and fruit. Acwavit is rarely exported, although it is primarily consumed by tourists...

The nation’s religious and cultural heritage is also an attraction. Although Christian for over a thousand years, and legally Lutheran for five hundred, the island has always maintained an unusual amount of pre-Christian folklore and tradition, which has been actively promoted by the government over the last century. The spring festival of Àrkenfriðedy is particularly notable, featuring singing, boundary-walking, maypole dancing and tree-decorating during the day, and bonfires and naked communal dancing (traditionally painted in ash, though more recently often in other pigments) at night. In recent years it has come to attract a number of neopagan or simply fun-seeking tourists. The festival also sees wicker statues of Rąnn, of varying sizes, containing various offerings, ceremonially “drowned”.

Those seeking a more dignified form of culture, however, may instead wish to seek out the Brotherhood of the Pious. An 18th century schismatic group with its roots in Puritanism and Pietism, the Brotherhood eschew luxury, decadence, and modern innovations. They do not welcome gawping outsiders, but they do run residential courses for respectful seekers after truth. They are the most extreme of the island’s several sects of austere Protestantism; and indeed, despite the obvious surface elements of a rather unselfconscious heathenism, Wenthar culture does show considerable influence from its tradition of hardline Protestantism – binge drinking, for example, is far more rare than in most countries of a comparable latitude, as is childbirth out of wedlock.

Finally, don’t overlook the regional variations within the islands. In particular, the remote Eostamannøyna archipelago preserves a remarkably traditional culture, with a much greater similarity to that of Iceland or the Faroes.
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Zythros Jubi » Sun 16 Jul 2017, 20:28

Dinnkjirkj? Is that Dunkirk?
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Mon 17 Jul 2017, 16:49

Zythros Jubi wrote:Dinnkjirkj? Is that Dunkirk?
Good guess, but no. "Dunkirk" is equivalent to English "Downchurch"; "dinnkjirkj" translates to English "Deanchurch" or "Denchurch".

[I should have said something in that post about the culture of poetry recitals, but never mind]
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Mon 17 Jul 2017, 16:52


6. Dig into the history


The Wenthars may not be at the top of anyone’s list of historically-rich nations, but while you’re there it would be a shame not to spend a little time seeing the sights. You might just be surprised.

The oldest sites in the islands are the ancient Celtic monasteries, of which eleven were originally established; five were destroyed in, or abandoned after, Viking raids, while four more fell into disuse in later centuries. The remaining two were modernised into monasteries of continental orders – the Cistercians and the Augustinian Canons – at which time a number of other Cistercian and Augustinian abbeys and priories were constructed, and one abbey of the Brigittines. All monasteries were abolished during the referendum, and most have been reduced to ruins. A few sites, however, continue to be worth visiting. The old abbey at Halfessa has long since been reduced to a small parish church, a disused bell tower and an adjoining farmhouse (now a visitor centre), but has immense symbolic importance as the location of the discovery, and presumably creation, of the Halfstabók, a mediaeval illuminated manuscript recording the mythic history of the islands that is considered the primary source for the oldest national traditions, as well as a priceless work of art; in some ways, the abbey at Halfessa can be considered the spiritual, if not political, birthplace of the nation – although the plain whitewashed stone of the small church is not much to look at. Similarly, many tourists visit the granite ruins of Clawdubh Abbey, the cultural capital of the islands in the first millennium. Far more spectacular are the ruins of Hęsnøy Abbey, occupying the whole of the small island of Hęsnøy, once the largest and richest Cistercian abbey on the islands, and the de facto capital of the islands for several centuries. The abbey escaped total destruction through repurposing into the residence of the Lord of the West, but was later allowed to fall into disrepair; several ancillary buildings have survived. Much humbler, and more remote, is the tiny Celtic monastery on storm-lashed Westennock – the visitor who braves the crossing can see enter not only the old chapel, in the shadow of its granite belltower, but also the rough beehive cells where a dozen monks once lived. The island – small, remote, and haunted by clerical ghosts – has largely been left untouched by later generations, and the ruins stand amid an almost tropical profusion of ferns, mosses, and wind-stunted oaks. Those seeking a more lived-in religious experience may wish to seek out the Birgitclásta, formerly a wealthy nunnery and now the cathedral of the port city of Halsbørgh; situated on the Birgitsyll, the Gothic abbey church towers over the town and is one of the most impressive churches in the country, while the residential quarters were repurposed first as a hospital, then as a school, then as an administrative centre, and finally as a college of the national university.

A more martial fate awaited the old abbey of Wolfheymsfęll on southern Walløy. Originally a Celtic monastery, the site was (with the exception of the old belltower) almost entirely reconstructed by the Cirstercians in striking and substantial white stone. After the reformation, the abbey was repurposed to become a military fortress, later encircled by a star fort; further fortifications and subterranean tunnels were established during WWII. An even larger Danish star fort stands on the island of Táthøy, commanding the main deep-water channel to Meynlað; this, however, was substantially damaged by Allied bombing and only partially restored. It chiefly serves today as a museum to political prisoners from the WWII era.

Táthøy and Wolfheymsfęll are only two of the many islands’ remainders of the painful wartime era. Numerous concrete fortifications still dot the landscape, particularly the coastline, and several are open to the public as museums or memorials. Of particular interest is the WX-17 complex: the only Axis submarine pen constructed outside mainland Europe, built with angled concrete walls and sheltered on two sides by cliffs; the site also includes coastal ramparts and anti-aircraft guns. As the islands surrendered to Allied occupation prior to the development of ‘bunker-busting’ explosives, the complex remains in excellent condition, and indeed was leased to the United States until the 1990s, though for most of that time is was used only as a intelligence station; the complex now serves as a museum. Another submarine refuge, WX-8, is natural in form – an underwater crack in a cliff face beneath Fjallhaugh wide enough to permit the entry of a small submarine. This crack was enlarged to provide some small repair facilities above the water line, but the complex is best known for the small treasure chambers and bunker delved into the rock, accessible only by submarine – WX-8 was designed as a redoubt to protect national treasures, and potentially the national leadership, from bombing raids, or even invasion.

Those looking for more genteel history are advised to visit Wildmore House. The oldest parts of this complex comprise the remains of another Celtic monastery (the belltower and chapel remain), later fortified (only a donjon remains). After the reformation, the site became a small country house, which fell in time into the hands of the Lords of the West, the rulers of the island (as subcontractors for the Danish throne). At first only a secondary residence, the site became famous in the 17th century as the place of “imprisonment” of Jacobina Wildmore, a daughter of the Lord (during the Lordship’s lease to an English family). Lady Jacobina later became the de facto ruler of the islands during the absentee reigns of her nephew and her niece, and left a large cultural footprint, as a patroness of (illegal but tolerated) Catholicism and as a collector and promoter of folklore and cultural traditions.

Today, however, the mediaeval remains comprise only a small part of the site, dwarfed by Wildmore House itself, constructed by Lady Jacobina’s grand-nephew, Humiliation Wildmore in a grand and fanciful Petrine Baroque style; the grounds contain a landscape garden, three mazes, a grove, a variety of formal gardens, a hunting forest, and a number of towers and grottos. The entire complex, while modest by continental princely standards, is entirely out of proportion to both its immediate surroundings and the poverty of the nation at the time, and, together with a number of smaller dramatic architectural projects around the islands, was conceivable only due to the low labour costs on the islands, and even then virtually bankrupted the Wildmore family; Humiliation’s ambitions, however, were noble, as the continual building works were intended as moral and economic stimulus to the local economy, and he is regarded with some affection today.

When Danish direct rule was reimposed (in response both to Wildmore’s bankruptcy and his diplomatically awkward flirtations with Jacobitism (Bonnie Prince Charlie himself briefly resided at Wildmore House)), the manor house became the official residence of the Governor of the Wenthars, and later was employed as the state residence in the Wenthars of the King of Norway during the 19th century (although only two state visits were made in the whole of the century). After the dissolution of the union of Norway and Sweden, the new king made a further visit to attempt to persuade the Wenthars not to seek independence; on the fourth state visit, independence was agreed in Wildmore House’s Music Room, now known as Independence Hall. Following independence, and amid considerable distaste for the cramped and spartan quarters of the parliament chambers in the Charlotsborg, Wildmore House served as the seat of national government for three decades, although in practice most governmental office space remained in the capital. Today, Wildmore House is still used for certain state occasions, but the rest of the year is open to visitors, offering both 18th century glamour and 20th century political history, as well as the pleasure of its outdoor spaces.

Regarding politics, the islands have had three capital towns, and all three are well worth a visit. The mediaeval capital was Rockelbørgh on Northøy, on a small rise in the shadow of Crestesrock. Constructed of heavy dark rock in a dry stone wall style, most of the ‘old town’, with its narrow, twisting and uneven streets, is still standing, although it is very small in area by continental standards. Most of the original first-millennium wall also remains. Outside that wall are larger, later structures including the Cynewundsabbat (formerly an Augustinian monastery, currently a cathedral and museum) and the Abshús, former home of the Lords of the West, currently an art gallery, adjoining what is now a public park. The original Abshús was rebuilt in the late 17th century by Lady Jacobina in a somewhat out-of-keeping Italianate neoclassical style, for political reasons. Rockelbørgh remains a relatively small city of some 10,000 people, though it has grown to that total rapidly in recent decades thanks to the tourist industry.

In the early modern period, Rockalbørgh’s dominence was challenged by the growth of a new town on Maynlað, which after the return to direct Danish rule would be named Cristanshǫfn and made the provincial capital. While Cristanshǫfn lacks the ancient history of Rockelbørgh, it soon outpaced it in population, as an accessible port town on the archipelago’s most populous island. The core of the city is built in an attractive but plain 18th century northern Baroque style, and is generally brightly-painted; the dock area is largely 19th century in origin, and is still filled with warehouses and wharfs. The Charlotsborg, despite its name, is less a castle and more an early sprawling office building in the town centre, from which the country was administered under Danish and Norwegian rule. It currently holds a museum encompassing political history, national art, the small but pleasant old State Rooms, and the history of penal justice on the islands (the castle was long home to a gaol); however, a section of the complex is still used for local administration purposes. Cristanshǫfn is the largest city in the country, with nearly 80,000 inhabitants, and offers the widest array of shops and cultural events; it is, for example, home to the National Philharmonia, although concerts are periodically given around the islands.

The modern capital of the country, however, is not Cristanshǫfn but Wethafurð, on the island of Langlað. Wethafurð is in principle an old settlement, but the current city was constructed almost entirely de novo in the 20th century. The city centre, or “Cappetel”, was largely created in the 1920s and 1930s, and is a significant tourist attraction; the original core is an imposing, almost imperial (if small) assembly of major government and national buildings, including the Statstiøraðes Ybuw (Council Buildings), the Spicarshús (Speaker’s House), the Lywarkív (National Archive), the Thøðadǫmsąl’s Ybuw (National Courts Building), the Lywamyséum (National People’s Museum), the Thøðamyséum ova Scienta (National Museum of Science), the Thøðabóksąwnen’s Ybuw (National Library Building), the Lywasąl lør Cwéðing (People’s Hall of Rhapsody), the Lywacademi ova tha Lista and Lywjacademi ova tha Yrkecrafta (the National Academies of the Arts and of the Crafts), the Kjenerel Postconta’s Ybuw (National Post Office Building, home to the post office, telecomunications network, pensions authority and intelligence services), the Thøðaminster (National Cathedral) and the Storsąl av tha Liøwa (the Great Hall of the People), along with accompanying parks and monuments. These buildings are all constructed in the Cappetelstile – a form combining Modernism, Neoclassicism, and local primitivism, with influence from the demands of the climate. Cappetelstile buildings are largely constructed from whitewashed concrete, sometimes with highlighting in light or dark granite, with little obvious ornamentation but some Classical affectations, such the colonade. Roofs are typically pitched, shingle-patterned and dark, and there are often small elements of elaborate, animalistic knotwork – on doors, mullions, etc. The design may be seen as essentially a Nordic-inflected, relatively miniature variation on the neoclassicism of fascist Italy or Germany. Much of the city was constructed in this style, until it gave way to international brutalism in the post-war era, and Cappetelstile has continued to return to favour periodically ever since. The most notable exception to the style within the core is the slightly older Storymóts Ybuw (Parliament Building), constructed in Láðstil – essentially, as a giant blackhouse, with jagged dry stone walls and a gently domed roof.
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by horizont » Tue 25 Jul 2017, 09:03

Really enjoying reading this:)
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by alynnidalar » Wed 26 Jul 2017, 19:44

Sounds fabulous. What airport should I buy tickets for?
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Zythros Jubi » Tue 01 Aug 2017, 09:12

Where is Wenthar Island in OTL?
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Salmoneus » Wed 02 Aug 2017, 00:03

horizont wrote:Really enjoying reading this:)
Thank you! I'm glad someone did. Guess I should post the last couple of sections at some point...

Alynnidalar: the main international airport is Finnloge Yngomąr Yósefsson Aerodrom, just outside Wethafurð, opened in the 1980s. More rarely, international flights can be found to the older (1960s) Brenda Heriwald Øbhresson Aerodrom, near Cristanshǫfn, though this is now primarily used for freight.

However, do be aware that the local weather conditions are not ideal for air travel. Flights may be cancelled or delayed at short notice, or may even fail to land on the island at all, being re-routed to the Faroes or even Iceland. In particular, don't book a flight in the winter months unless it's really necessary.

An alternative travel option would be to take a boat. Ferries operate from Glasgow and Derry/Londonderry, and occasionally Torshavn, and the passage takes less than two days each way - though this is not recommended for those without strong stomachs and good sea legs.

[Yngomąr Yósefsson is commonly regarded as the father of the country, being the leader of the National People's Party at the time of independence, and Speaker for the following decade. Brenda Øbhresson, his contemporary, was the nation's most famous (which isn't saying much) composer, who wrote the national anthem and compiled many old folk songs (outside the Wenthars, he's most famous these days for his rather flamboyant piano concerto).]

Zythros: the Wenthars are located west of the Hebrides and northwest of Ireland (southwest of the Faroes and Iceland). Crestesrock is the mountain that on our earth is largely submerged and known as Rockall.
Zythros Jubi
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Re: Eight Reasons to Visit the Wenthar Islands!

Post by Zythros Jubi » Wed 02 Aug 2017, 06:01

Would you like to make a Celtic conlang spoken in Wenthar?
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