The NEW Resources Thread

A forum for guides, lessons and sharing of useful information.
User avatar
Shemtov
runic
runic
Posts: 2753
Joined: 29 Apr 2013 03:06

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Shemtov » 05 Dec 2016 07:36

Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

User avatar
Shemtov
runic
runic
Posts: 2753
Joined: 29 Apr 2013 03:06

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Shemtov » 16 Dec 2016 22:09

Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

User avatar
Isfendil
greek
greek
Posts: 702
Joined: 19 Feb 2016 03:47

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Isfendil » 21 Dec 2016 22:15

If there are obscure resources at my uni no longer or unprotected by copyright, I will see if I can scan them on request. I may learn something myself.

User avatar
k1234567890y
runic
runic
Posts: 2963
Joined: 04 Jan 2014 04:47
Contact:

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by k1234567890y » 17 Feb 2017 12:41

Thank you a lot Shemetov (:

btw, I got a list of human universals, it is claimed that all human cultures have the things listed in this list:

http://joelvelasco.net/teaching/2890/br ... ersals.pdf

You might claim that they are wrong, but I think at least it can be a good reference for making concultures for human ethnic groups.

It is calimed that all human cultures have all of these concepts and phenomena, well you may argue that something is lacking from some societies, I think if you want to make a realistic culture of human beings, you can try to contain all of them.

By government I guess it means "a way to make decision through the leaders of the society", maybe even the smallest communities need a leader to make final decisions sometimes although small societies, like bands and tribes, are often said to be more egalitarian and virtually everyone in those small societies have a chance to express their own opinions over an issue.
私のアツい人工言語活動!言カツ!始まります!!

User avatar
Foolster41
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 167
Joined: 11 Aug 2012 06:45
Location: pacific Northwest, USA
Contact:

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Foolster41 » 14 Mar 2017 19:41

I found a cool web/android (/ios?) app for memorizing languages called Memrise. You can make your own lessons, including adding recording audio examples of words and phrases, and can split it into lesson blocks. This is a pretty cool tool for commiting your language to memory, or sharing with other people.

I already made one for my language, Salthan, and set it to public so you can search on the app on find it.

User avatar
GrandPiano
runic
runic
Posts: 2668
Joined: 11 Jan 2015 23:22
Location: Ohio, USA

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by GrandPiano » 14 Mar 2017 19:56

Foolster41 wrote:I found a cool web/android (/ios?) app for memorizing languages called Memrise. You can make your own lessons, including adding recording audio examples of words and phrases, and can split it into lesson blocks. This is a pretty cool tool for commiting your language to memory, or sharing with other people.

I already made one for my language, Salthan, and set it to public so you can search on the app on find it.
I can confirm that it is also available on iOS, as I have been using Memrise myself for quite some time.

It's also worth noting that while it's primarily meant for language learning, Memrise is also useful for memorizing other things, including academic subjects like geography and science. There are plenty of user-made courses for all sorts of languages and subjects, so you don't have to make your own (although I would recommend it for language vocab). The neat thing about Memrise is that it uses an algorithm that incorporates spaced repetition to determine which words you need the most review for and show you those words more frequently until you have them memorized.
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

User avatar
OTʜᴇB
roman
roman
Posts: 960
Joined: 14 May 2016 10:59
Location: SW England

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by OTʜᴇB » 14 Mar 2017 20:35

GrandPiano wrote:
Foolster41 wrote:I found a cool web/android (/ios?) app for memorizing languages called Memrise. You can make your own lessons, including adding recording audio examples of words and phrases, and can split it into lesson blocks. This is a pretty cool tool for commiting your language to memory, or sharing with other people.

I already made one for my language, Salthan, and set it to public so you can search on the app on find it.
I can confirm that it is also available on iOS, as I have been using Memrise myself for quite some time.

It's also worth noting that while it's primarily meant for language learning, Memrise is also useful for memorizing other things, including academic subjects like geography and science. There are plenty of user-made courses for all sorts of languages and subjects, so you don't have to make your own (although I would recommend it for language vocab). The neat thing about Memrise is that it uses an algorithm that incorporates spaced repetition to determine which words you need the most review for and show you those words more frequently until you have them memorized.
Indeed. I started using it to learn Japanese a couple of years ago. It worked wonders for learning the kana, but as soon as it went into vocab, I very quickly found myself just recognising the shapes of the phrases it was giving me, and not actually learning what they meant or how they were formed. Good for list data, terrible for actual understanding. It has its place and it sits in said place very well, but that place isn't very big.
:con: : Current Project

BTW I use Arch

User avatar
GrandPiano
runic
runic
Posts: 2668
Joined: 11 Jan 2015 23:22
Location: Ohio, USA

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by GrandPiano » 16 Mar 2017 23:38

OTʜᴇB wrote:I very quickly found myself just recognising the shapes of the phrases it was giving me, and not actually learning what they meant or how they were formed.
Can you elaborate on this? I'm not sure how "recognizing the shapes" differs from normal reading comprehension, or what exactly you mean by "how they were formed".
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

User avatar
OTʜᴇB
roman
roman
Posts: 960
Joined: 14 May 2016 10:59
Location: SW England

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by OTʜᴇB » 17 Mar 2017 13:50

GrandPiano wrote:
OTʜᴇB wrote:I very quickly found myself just recognising the shapes of the phrases it was giving me, and not actually learning what they meant or how they were formed.
Can you elaborate on this? I'm not sure how "recognizing the shapes" differs from normal reading comprehension, or what exactly you mean by "how they were formed".
As in I stopped learning them by recognising the words and the grammar, but instead by recognising a pattern, such as number of characters or the first few that were unique to that phrase in the lesson. I didn't learn how to ask for someone's name, I just recognised what "what is your name?" looked like just enough to get the right answer. That info would have been worse than useless when actually trying to read or write, let alone speak.
:con: : Current Project

BTW I use Arch

User avatar
GrandPiano
runic
runic
Posts: 2668
Joined: 11 Jan 2015 23:22
Location: Ohio, USA

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by GrandPiano » 17 Mar 2017 22:43

OTʜᴇB wrote:
GrandPiano wrote:
OTʜᴇB wrote:I very quickly found myself just recognising the shapes of the phrases it was giving me, and not actually learning what they meant or how they were formed.
Can you elaborate on this? I'm not sure how "recognizing the shapes" differs from normal reading comprehension, or what exactly you mean by "how they were formed".
As in I stopped learning them by recognising the words and the grammar, but instead by recognising a pattern, such as number of characters or the first few that were unique to that phrase in the lesson. I didn't learn how to ask for someone's name, I just recognised what "what is your name?" looked like just enough to get the right answer. That info would have been worse than useless when actually trying to read or write, let alone speak.
It should eventually ask you to type it in yourself rather than choose from a set of options.
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

User avatar
cedh
metal
metal
Posts: 370
Joined: 07 Sep 2011 21:25
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Contact:

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by cedh » 18 Apr 2017 14:09

A couple of scholarly papers on the history of Romanian (of interest to romlangers):
http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/inde ... ue/view/89

Daistallia
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 1
Joined: 21 Jun 2017 01:28

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Daistallia » 21 Jun 2017 02:00

An collection of assorted resources:
https://daistallia.neocities.org/links.html

PeteBleackley
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 96
Joined: 10 Nov 2014 16:47

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by PeteBleackley » 26 Aug 2017 22:13

I'd like to introduce The Conlang Sources Wiki, which aims to document scholarship, journalism, criticism and other third-party discussion of conlangs.

User avatar
Shemtov
runic
runic
Posts: 2753
Joined: 29 Apr 2013 03:06

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Shemtov » 23 Jan 2018 04:21

Though no E-book is available,I highly recommend this book as an intro to Diachronics, for anyone interested in Diachronic conlanging. It's especially good given that compared to most intros to the topic, it focuses much less on IE (The late Terry Crowley, one of the co-authors, was a leader in the study of Oceanic and Pama-Nyugan Diachronics and was well versed in Papuan Linguistics ):
https://books.google.com/books/about/An ... 8v-s6fyt0C
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4493
Joined: 14 Aug 2012 18:32

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Creyeditor » 23 Jan 2018 19:15

It's crazy how this book deals so much with Papuan languages without mentioning any language from the Indonesian part of New Guinea [:D]
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

User avatar
k1234567890y
runic
runic
Posts: 2963
Joined: 04 Jan 2014 04:47
Contact:

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by k1234567890y » 12 Apr 2018 15:51

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... sp=sharing

This is a spreadsheet of the rime groups of Old Chinese made by me, current there are the rimes constructed by Li Fang-kuei and Baxter-Sagart. The rime groups reconstructed by Zhengzhang Shangfang are yet to be added
私のアツい人工言語活動!言カツ!始まります!!

User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4493
Joined: 14 Aug 2012 18:32

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Creyeditor » 14 Jun 2018 20:29

I just wanted to share this. I finally found a feature based Sound Change applier/Phonological Rules applier. So, everyone who also looked for it. There it is [:)]
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

Birdlang
greek
greek
Posts: 640
Joined: 25 Dec 2014 20:17
Location: Virginia

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Birdlang » 08 Jul 2018 12:11

The simple word generator is not working. It goes to some page with pop up ads and potential viruses.
Ꭓꭓ Ʝʝ Ɬɬ Ɦɦ Ɡɡ Ɥɥ Ɫɫ Ɽɽ Ɑɑ Ɱɱ Ɐɐ Ɒɒ Ɓɓ Ɔɔ Ɖɖ Ɗɗ Əə Ɛɛ Ɠɠ Ɣɣ Ɯɯ Ɲɲ Ɵɵ Ʀʀ Ʃʃ Ʈʈ Ʊʊ Ʋʋ Ʒʒ Ꞵꞵ Ʉʉ Ʌʌ Ŋŋ Ɂɂ Ɪɪ Ææ Øø Ð𠌜 Ɜɜ Ǝɘ

User avatar
Micamo
MVP
MVP
Posts: 7186
Joined: 05 Sep 2010 18:48
Contact:

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by Micamo » 08 Aug 2018 08:35

My pronouns are <xie> [ʒiː] / <xer> [ʒɚ]

My shitty twitter

chris_notts
hieroglyphic
hieroglyphic
Posts: 35
Joined: 14 Feb 2012 00:49

Re: The NEW Resources Thread

Post by chris_notts » 08 Nov 2018 00:06

Creyeditor wrote:
14 Jun 2018 20:29
I just wanted to share this. I finally found a feature based Sound Change applier/Phonological Rules applier. So, everyone who also looked for it. There it is [:)]
I wrote a sound change applier called HaSC (in Haskell) a few years ago which did this. To get it all to work I found I had to write my own regular expression engine, as mapping featural pattern matches to a standard char / string regex engine in the general case was more or less impossible.

I had it hosted on my website for a while, but it wasn't used much and I just lacked the time to maintain it correctly. I have a vague ambition to resurrect and un-bitrot it one day (new library and GHC versions means it needs some updates to compile).

Post Reply