One third of the way through the decade

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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by sangi39 » Sun 15 Oct 2017, 23:04

This decade for me, barring politics, will likely be remembered for Game of Thrones, reboots and retcons in film and TV, especially Star Trek and Star Wars, and that's about it, I guess. Apart from my personal life, I've found this decade particularly bland, just carrying on what we saw in the "Noughties". I don't really know about "popular" music, passes me by as I keep tabs on metal album release dates.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Axiem » Mon 16 Oct 2017, 02:09

All of my children have been born this decade, so for me personally, that's kind of a big deal.

In media, this will probably be remembered as the decade when television had a huge renaissance. Many of the seeds (e.g. Breaking Bad) were laid at the end of the last decade, but it feels like it's really coming into its all right now. I don't see that changing in the next couple of years.

In some circles, it might also be known as having a large sudden blooming of complicated/interesting board games, though I feel like that might have started last decade. It'll probably continue for a while, given current trends.

Technology-wise, it's been the decade of the smartphone and the tablet, quickly overcoming laptops and desktops. The decade of the app, as it were, and the societal and economic fallout from that, such as through things like Tindr, Uber, and Angry Birds. These are things that started at the tail end of the last decade in terms of being offered, but their impact took until this decade. Even social networks were a thing last decade (The Social Network was a 2010 film, meaning it's closer to the creation of Facebook than it is to now), but their impact and influence has become more prominent (e.g. the Arab Spring, the 2016 election, GamerGate). I anticipate these effects will continue.

Politics-wise.......eesh. I really wonder what they'll say about all this in my kids' history textbooks. Because yeah.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by qwed117 » Mon 16 Oct 2017, 03:20

To be honest, it's way too early to make any assessments on our generation. I'd think it's the perfect time to judge the decade before us though.

Technology:
The internet is still kicking hard and strong. Unlike the telephone or telegram however, it has become an extremely useful political tool, starting with the Dean campaign in 2004 and still up to today. This was obvious in 2010, and only becomes more and more so.
Apple's cellphone hegemony was never well founded. Although they could rely on a couple of patents to protect their control, it was extremely clear that they wouldn't last forever. The iPods that had brought them back into fame was on a downhill slope in 2010.
Netflix successfully destroyed Blockbuster (thank god).
"Phone technology" is increasingly seen as formal and/or dated

Politics:
Either 2000 or 2010 gets my choice for the most change in politics. If I had to place a new era in politics, I wouldn't place it in the 2016 election or 2010 election. 2000 would definitely win that position.
The growth of the hard right wing in the Republican party will grow, as hard as the centrists try to prevent it.
Gay marriage is unprecedented in the US at this time. After Lawrence v. Texas though, it looks as the snowball kept rolling. Maybe the surge in popularity circa 2010 is actually associated with Katy Perry becoming popular or the Tyler Clementi case.
Television becomes intimately intertwined with politics as we see starting in 2000.
Hurricane Katrina's brutal damage to Louisiana is probably the reason why Louisiana lost an electoral college vote in 2010. There's also the possibility that it may have affected Barack Obama's performance in the state somewhat

Culture:
Well, I now see more (stereotypical) jocks playing videogames than (stereotypical) nerds.
American Idol left its mark on television, but ultimately proved to be more of a fad than anything.
Rap and R&B culture has become increasingly popular since it first entered the mainstream in the 1990s.
Beyonce was the only major member of Destiny's Child to survive.
Electronica has become more and more popular as well, becoming a stronger influence on popular music.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Khemehekis » Wed 18 Oct 2017, 04:47

sangi39 wrote:This decade for me, barring politics, will likely be remembered for Game of Thrones, reboots and retcons in film and TV, especially Star Trek and Star Wars, and that's about it, I guess. Apart from my personal life, I've found this decade particularly bland, just carrying on what we saw in the "Noughties". I don't really know about "popular" music, passes me by as I keep tabs on metal album release dates.
A thought: will this be pointed to as the decade when conlangs became mainstream? The word "conlang" getting into the OED and Webster's, Dothraki from Game of Thrones, people learning Na'vi.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Khemehekis » Wed 18 Oct 2017, 04:56

qwed117 wrote:To be honest, it's way too early to make any assessments on our generation.
Our generation -- the Millennials? Or our decade?
Apple's cellphone hegemony was never well founded. Although they could rely on a couple of patents to protect their control, it was extremely clear that they wouldn't last forever. The iPods that had brought them back into fame was on a downhill slope in 2010.
Hmmm . . . I still use an iPod Classic. And iPhones are still very popular, even with the advent of the Android.
Netflix successfully destroyed Blockbuster (thank god).
8)
Either 2000 or 2010 gets my choice for the most change in politics. If I had to place a new era in politics, I wouldn't place it in the 2016 election or 2010 election. 2000 would definitely win that position.
What was it about 2010 that changed so much? But I definitely place the "Gush and Bore" election as the point when the nineties ended.
Gay marriage is unprecedented in the US at this time. After Lawrence v. Texas though, it looks as the snowball kept rolling. Maybe the surge in popularity circa 2010 is actually associated with Katy Perry becoming popular or the Tyler Clementi case.
I was so happy when sodomy laws were stricken down. Good riddance. And it opened the door to Massachusetts legalizing gay marriage in 2004. The Netherlands, Canada and Spain were early legalizers too.
Hurricane Katrina's brutal damage to Louisiana is probably the reason why Louisiana lost an electoral college vote in 2010. There's also the possibility that it may have affected Barack Obama's performance in the state somewhat
Nationally, Hurricane Katrina is credited with making Bush a lot less popular.
Well, I now see more (stereotypical) jocks playing videogames than (stereotypical) nerds.
Could it just be that there are more jocks than nerds? My high school was about 4% jocks and rednecks, 1% nerds (defined as smart but square kids with very strong interests and no social skills), 25% preppies (clean-cut kids who take AP classes to become an Organization Man), and 70% Youth Culturalists. I imagine there are many other high schools and colleges that are the same way.
American Idol left its mark on television, but ultimately proved to be more of a fad than anything.
Kelly Clarkson, Adam Lambert and Philip Philips are still stars.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Salmoneus » Thu 19 Oct 2017, 16:10

qwed117 wrote: The internet is still kicking hard and strong. Unlike the telephone or telegram however, it has become an extremely useful political tool
I would say that this is clearly the decade in which young people make bizarre statements about the past that show a completely lack of awareness or understanding of their own historical context... but I'm aware that that's probably all decades.


Anyway...

...pop music is ephemeral. Very few popular musicians are remembered in later years - by 'remembered' I mean known of by later generations, not just present as a half-known trivia question or something old people think back on nostalgically. This is even more an issue now, with the market being much more fragmented. And the ones who do last are usually not the megastars (though a few gigastars do make it) - those songs are driven by fashion, which fades. Instead, those who are remembered are those who have cult followings in their day, or who go on to inspire many followers (some of whose fans in turn become fans of the original group). And in the really long term, picking which music will be remembered is extremely difficult. Two hundred years ago, people thought they'd be remembered as the era of George Onslow and John Fields (while nobody but a few lieder enthusiasts had even heard of Schubert).

...however, general trends in popular music will be remembered as distinctive of the era. I don't know what those might be.


...historians of entertainment culture will look on this decade as an inflexion point in the consumption of entertainment media. The rise of netflix threatens to replace large national oligarchies with a global monopoly or near monopoly (I'm betting that the EU bans it eventually*). The TV model is moving decisively away from episodic shows toward heavy serialisation - even the casual network shows today are far more serialised than almost anything on US TV twenty years ago, and the 'serious' shows have all adopted the British/'HBO' serialised short season model. More fundamentally, online media is eroding the traditional distinctions between "film", "television" and "youtube", and we are moving from a model in which a small number of networks decide the small number of things created, and toward a model in which a vast amount is produced (even more in future, with falling production costs for digital work) and an even smaller number of networks decides how to curate and promote it.

...in terms of entertainment content, the decade will be remembered as the era of the superhero, which has gone from being a minor, occasional film genre in the naughties to being the predominant film genre today, and which is now expanding into TV as well. I don't imagine superhero films will suddenly die out in 2010, of course - in some ways the genre looks to be growing (there's more diversity of style being introduced). But inevitably it will become increasingly passé, and decline in prominence - in the same way that we still have Westerns, but the 1950s (approximately) are remembered as the golden age of the Western.


...mostly, though, the decade will be remembered for its politics. Not the details, exactly, but the atmosphere. What will be remembered most will be the continued advances in minority rights - the short term, the excesses of the left will be reviled and lead to a backlash, but in the long run they'll be whitewashed over (no pun intended), in the same way the excesses of the 60s and 70s are mostly forgotten. In the short term, the next decade will probably seen general regression, and a turn to violence on the left (again, as in the seventies). In the future, the right-wing side of the equation will be backgrounded - in the same way that we remember the '60s for the liberal side, and the conservative side is only mentioned as something to rebel against - so that in future people will probably have an overly rosy view of what the decade was actually like to live in. [in the future, the 90s will probably be revised and seen as a hellhole time before the revolution - people will be said to be wanting to drag society back to the 1990s, and people will forget how the 90s actually felt]

...it may also be remembered as a decade of historic peace, with no major international conflicts (the Syrian Civil War is horrible, but relatively speaking it's the sort of thing that gets pushed way to the back of the mind in eras with major conflicts).

...in technology, it's the era of the smartphone and social media - both of which existed before 2010, but only in nascent form. Specifically, the era of Facebook (although that may already have faded - maybe that's more 2005-1015). Of course, mobile communications and social telecommunication will continue to exist in the future, but I suspect not in the current form, and I suspect the idea of Facebook as the single online socialisation platform is as doomed as AOL was as the single web-browsing platform (instead there will be, and to some extent already is, a more diverse ecosystem of multiple parallel socialisation channels, probably more integrated into other technologies like telephonics and augmented reality).

...it's one of the last decades before the rise of the machines.




*What Netflix is doing is basically using market dominance in one field to bundle goods from other fields, which is something EU antitrust guys are getting really active on. The classic example is the way Microsoft sells you its OS, and uses that to try to make you use its browser; the EU doesn't like this and wants more separation. Likewise, when Google as a search engine promotes other Google products ahead of those by its rivals.
Now, what Netflix does is bundle three services together: a media platform, a content catalogue, and a production company. When you log onto Netflix, you can only watch things that are in the Netflix catalogue (which is itself a bundling of lots of products, most of which you don't want, and some of which have themselves been produced by Netflix). This is clear market exploitation. The platform (user friendliness, curation algorithms, etc) is not just competing on its own merits, but on the popularity of its catalogue; and likewise its catalogue is promoted by the popularity of the platform. At some point, the authorities will step in to force separation. So then, when you log onto Netflix the platform, that platform will also offer things that are in, say, the Hulu catalogue - equally accessible, equally promoted by the algorithms, etc; and then, if I have a Hulu subscription, I can watch directly through Netflix; or, I could pay a one-off price for the single Hulu show (which would be higher in the long-run than a subscription, but not exorbitant).
These things may not appear important with companies breaking new ground. But when they become dominant near-monopolies in vitally important sectors of the economy (and of politics - it can't be long before people get their news bulletins through Netflix), this sort of exploitation and power becomes more important. Which we should particularly be thinking of when, for example, the CEO of Facebook is running to be made President of the USA...
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Thu 19 Oct 2017, 17:32

Re: historic peace. I think this decade will also be remembered for an increase in terrorist attacks (both impromptu and not), particularly in Europe. It is an era characterized not by nation-states warring, but by extra-national entities like ISIS, who have a wide presence across borders and are more difficult to battle than a "traditional" enemy. Perhaps this decade may be remembered for the fracturing of the EU (although this is just a predication of the consequences of Britain leaving). It will be interesting if the Balkanization of Spain occurs as well, or if the Kurds ever manage to get a state.

Re: politics. The middle of this decade is seeing a rise in right-wing populism, but elections in the Netherlands and other European countries may have put a slight damper on this. It's also seeing a disappointing decline in race relations in the U.S., and from my point of view, increased political polarization. More and more young people I know are becoming disenchanted with the extremism of both sides (the awful candidates in the 2016 election was just the icing on the cake). Even people I know who once allied with "SJW"s came to adopt a more moderate position, and some have flipped entirely, joining the alt-right. But what comes of this will have to be determined once the rest of Trump's presidency comes to pass. I've often heard the American political climate of now compared to the late '60s. Having not lived very long, I'm not sure how apt this comparison is. But sometimes it does seem like political discourse is at its nadir. We are also seeing the decline of the traditional media and the increase of internet media as dominating political discussion.

The age of the smartphone has perhaps caused a decline in socialization and an increase in unhappiness in young people (I've come across a few studies that suggest this). Even I can't seem to "check my phone" less than 100 times a day (a slight exaggeration maybe, but not by much). I know it's an addiction and there may come a time when it's seen as an addiction as harmful as other more familiar ones (along with gaming, possibly).

Disclaimer: Just some observations from a young person. Not claiming to "know everything" or whatever. [:S]
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by gach » Thu 19 Oct 2017, 18:58

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:Re: historic peace. I think this decade will also be remembered for an increase in terrorist attacks (both impromptu and not), particularly in Europe. It is an era characterized not by nation-states warring, but by extra-national entities like ISIS, who have a wide presence across borders and are more difficult to battle than a "traditional" enemy.
I'll have to put a counterargument to that. Terror attacks in Europe are an old news. However, what has been on the rise for a while is a fear for traditional warfare. We've seen a shift from military downsizing still a decade or so ago to seriously considering increasing defence budgets. A case in point is Sweden where they are now bringing back a selective conscription after abolishing the old system in 2010. There's also a surprisingly fresh NATO discussion going on in Finland, which you can't explain simply by the cold war politicians starting to get old.

There is a lot of talk about information operations, but to me these still look pretty similar to regular old-fashioned propaganda, just done using contemporary technology.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Xonen » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 01:04

Salmoneus wrote:...pop music is ephemeral. Very few popular musicians are remembered in later years - by 'remembered' I mean known of by later generations, not just present as a half-known trivia question or something old people think back on nostalgically. This is even more an issue now, with the market being much more fragmented.
This. I seriously don't know who Ed Sheeran is, and that's probably because I'm not in the market fragment that listens to Ed Sheeran. Now, I do go to parties and bars and whatnot, so I'm not completely without exposure to pop music - but the stuff that plays in those actually seems to be increasingly made by Finnish artists and sung in Finnish these days (which I suppose is a positive development). Perhaps this has to do with the same market fragmentation; back in the heyday of MTV and massive international record companies, they could push a few international superstars everywhere, but now it's possible for a local musician to become a bigger star in the local market.
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Re: One third of the way through the decade

Post by Ànradh » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 06:51

The main trend for UK pop music at the moment is predominantly one of heavy dancehall and R&B influences, with a focus on spamming as many choruses and crescendo-drop pairings into a roughly three minute time-frame as possible. Expect auto-tune to be used throughout the performance, regardless of whether or not it's actually required by the singer, and set to such a ludicrously obvious degree that it throws weird, modulation-based artifacts throughout the track for 'stylistic' reasons... apparently, sounding like a synthetic simulacrum of a human being is no longer limited to being popular among the like of industrial fans.
The other major trend is a genre style I'm not readily able to name (pop acoustic?), but it uses a minimal arrangement focusing on the singer and an acoustic- or clean electric-guitar. This style tends to be more whimsically melancholy than the previous, but still crams far too many choruses into the piece to avoid my finding it repetitive. It's the style to which many of Ed Sheeran's hits belong, but he's happily got his foot in the other major trend. Oh, and my brother likes his older stuff, so I can also tell you that he used to be more indie/folk pop when he started out.
And, of course, electro-house is still the de facto theme genre for the summer.

On the metal side of things, a form of highly syncopated, prog-influenced deathcore, called djent, is still all the rage, and even has an oppressively dark-themed off-shoot known by the tongue-in-cheek moniker of 'thall' (of the latter, I'm more of a fan).
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