Greetings

Discussions regarding actual culture and history of Earth.
Bristel
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Re: Greetings

Post by Bristel » Thu 13 Oct 2011, 09:14

Thakowsaizmu wrote:
Bristel wrote:Irish:
Dia duit. God with you. (hello)
Dia is Muire duit. God and Mary with you. (hello in return)
Pretty sure it's Dia dhuit in both instances
Probably. I just forgot the lenition.

I keep seeing it spelled "duit", but only the LORD knows why so many people misspell it. (if it is... I'll check on it in my book and look around online to see if it happens to be correct, or marginally correct in dialects)
[bɹ̠ˤʷɪs.təɫ]
Nōn quālibet inīqua cupiditāte illectus hōc agō.
[tiː.mɔ.tʉɥs god.lɐf hɑwk]
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Darkgamma
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Re: Greetings

Post by Darkgamma » Thu 13 Oct 2011, 16:22

"Servus" and "Grias Gott", take a pick.
Svo hvernig get ég annað en glott á þig dauðlega?
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Re: Greetings

Post by Pirka » Sun 23 Oct 2011, 00:58

In Russia, if you're in an informal setting you can always use "Привет, как дела?" (Hi, how are things?) If you want to be rude you would use "Чего тебе?/Чё надо?" (What do you want?)

I often say "нормально" (OK) to the first one, but usually you can complain about things that are going on to a certain extent.
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Re: Greetings

Post by nikhil » Sun 23 Oct 2011, 11:58

In Hindi, these are the main greetings which are nowadays loosely translated as "hello":
"Namaste"/"Namaskar" - to anyone.
"Pranam" - to elders only (respectful). Elders often reply with blessings like "Live long" or "Be happy".
It's also very common to say things like "How are you?" or "How are things?"
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Avo
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Re: Greetings

Post by Avo » Sun 23 Oct 2011, 16:51

Besides buon giorno and buona sera ("good day/evening"), Italians use ciao for everything, from hello to goodbye.

In German, I use hi, was geht (so) (literally "what goes") and sometimes gude (I think this is a regional thing) with my friends or people of my age.
For goodbye, I usually use tschö, bis dann ('til then) and mach's gut (do it well).
When I need to be more formal, I use the more formal greetings, of course, but saying Guten Tag to friends would sound a little bit ridiculous or sarcastic to me.
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Re: Greetings

Post by Ollock » Sat 19 Nov 2011, 04:42

Chinese has some interesting ones:

你吃饭了吗?
ni3 chi1 fan4 le ma
2 eat rice PRF Q
"Have you eaten yet?"

^Somewhat archaic, but still heard from the older generation most definitely. Scourge of foreigners who expect it to be an invitation to eat rather than a standard greeting.

你忙什么?
ni3 mang2 shen2me
2 busy what

你在干嘛?
ni3 zai4 gan4 ma2
2 PRG to Q

^Both mean "What are you doing?" Leaving out the 在 is not recommended in the second, and that would turn it into 你干嘛?!, which is something you would say to a thief or other person you caught doing something mischievous.

What about specific greetings for answering the telephone? Chinese has 喂 wei2. Spanish has bueno, aló, diga, etc depending on the region. I think Japanese is moshimoshi (I can't write it in Japanese)...
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Ossicone
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Re: Greetings

Post by Ossicone » Sat 19 Nov 2011, 04:49

I like to say 'Ahoy' when answering the phone.
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Testyal
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Re: Greetings

Post by Testyal » Sat 19 Nov 2011, 14:44

My normal greeting is a soft 'Hey' or 'Heya', though when I answer the phone, I tend to say 'hello' (/hɛː'lə́ʊ̯/).
:deu: :fra: :zho: :epo:
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Ilaeriu
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Re: Greetings

Post by Ilaeriu » Sun 20 Nov 2011, 01:56

Korean:

The usual polite greeting in Korean is 안녕하세요 (annyeong-haseyo), which I recently realized actually means "Please be peaceful." (Translated to sound the most natural in English. Literally, it's "Please do/make peace.") Usually translated simply as "Hello."

Goodbyes are also the same, just 안녕하세요, but it can sometimes change to 안녕세요 (annyeong-GAseyo), which means "Please go in peace." You would of course say the latter to the person leaving, not if you were the person leaving.

Informally, you can just say the shortened 안녕 (annyeong). Which, interestingly, just means "peace." Usually translated simply as "Hi/hello."

I don't often hear literally "How are you?". But, similar to the Chinese example above, you do occasionally hear [밥] 먹었어요? ([Bap] meogeosseoyo?) which is "Have you eaten [food/rice] yet?" (The bracketed is optional. And yes, the word for food and rice is the same, which is interesting culture-wise but off topic :D)

Answering the phone is usually "여보세요?" (yeoboseyo?) This word is best translated as when, in English, we say "Hello?" asking if anyone is there. (e.g., knocking on a door, looking for someone, etc.)

Tagalog

We don't even have a regularly used (native) word for hello or hi anymore: we just say "Hello" or "Hi." We do, however, use "Kumusta?" pretty often, which just means "How are you?" or "How are things?" (It's also still a corruption of the Spanish ""Como está?"
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Re: Greetings

Post by Ollock » Thu 24 Nov 2011, 00:22

Ilaeriu wrote:I don't often hear literally "How are you?". But, similar to the Chinese example above, you do occasionally hear [밥] 먹었어요? ([Bap] meogeosseoyo?) which is "Have you eaten [food/rice] yet?" (The bracketed is optional. And yes, the word for food and rice is the same, which is interesting culture-wise but off topic :D)
The same is true of Chinese. There are other words that can mean "food" (餐 "meal", 菜 "vegetible), but they aren't, IME, used in the greeting, unless you replace "food" with the compound for breakfast, lunch, or dinner -- where some will substitute -餐 for -饭.
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Re: Greetings

Post by teh_Foxx0rz » Fri 25 Nov 2011, 00:04

Ollock wrote:
Ilaeriu wrote:I don't often hear literally "How are you?". But, similar to the Chinese example above, you do occasionally hear [밥] 먹었어요? ([Bap] meogeosseoyo?) which is "Have you eaten [food/rice] yet?" (The bracketed is optional. And yes, the word for food and rice is the same, which is interesting culture-wise but off topic :D)
The same is true of Chinese. There are other words that can mean "food" (餐 "meal", 菜 "vegetible), but they aren't, IME, used in the greeting, unless you replace "food" with the compound for breakfast, lunch, or dinner -- where some will substitute -餐 for -饭.
This is true in Japanese too actually (ご飯 gohan), though I don't think they actually do use it as a greeting.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Greetings

Post by eldin raigmore » Wed 30 Nov 2011, 01:28

Ossicone wrote:I like to say 'Ahoy' when answering the phone.
I was going to say "I say 'What the fuck do you want?' when answering the phone", but I figured nobody here would believe that even of me.
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Micamo
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Re: Greetings

Post by Micamo » Wed 30 Nov 2011, 02:50

Nah. You're way too nice :3
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Thakowsaizmu
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Re: Greetings

Post by Thakowsaizmu » Wed 30 Nov 2011, 03:57

eldin raigmore wrote:
Ossicone wrote:I like to say 'Ahoy' when answering the phone.
I was going to say "I say 'What the fuck do you want?' when answering the phone", but I figured nobody here would believe that even of me.
Oh, you mean that's not how you're supposed to answer the phone? Huh.
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thetha
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Re: Greetings

Post by thetha » Sun 04 Dec 2011, 16:42

teh_Foxx0rz wrote: This is true in Japanese too actually (ご飯 gohan), though I don't think they actually do use it as a greeting.
It's also true of Vietnamese. :mrgreen:
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cybrxkhan
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Re: Greetings

Post by cybrxkhan » Sun 04 Dec 2011, 17:43

Theta wrote:
teh_Foxx0rz wrote: This is true in Japanese too actually (ご飯 gohan), though I don't think they actually do use it as a greeting.
It's also true of Vietnamese. :mrgreen:

I don't recall ever hearing that... I think.
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smrk
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Re: Greetings

Post by smrk » Sat 07 Jan 2012, 00:44

I like to say 'Ahoy' when answering the phone.
Czechs actually do say "Ahoj" for "Hi". I sometimes forget how funny this is considering the very low incidence of pirates in the Czech Republic.

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Re: Greetings

Post by CMunk » Sat 07 Jan 2012, 10:00

In Danish we have a greeting "Hvad så?" meaning "What then?". It encourages the other one to tell the latest news of their life. Sort of equivalent to "What's up?".

But if there isn't something new to tell, I have trouble answering it. A sometimes used answer is "Så ikke rigtig noget" = "Then nothing in particular", but I think that sounds a bit sad, and awkward. Sometimes I say "Så er jeg hér", "Now I'm here", to avoid it.

It's a quite new way to greet eachother, which is why there isn't a fixed answer to it.
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Stammalor
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Re: Greetings

Post by Stammalor » Thu 26 Apr 2012, 16:07

Micamo wrote:In English, we say things like "How are you?" and "What are you up to?"

But I recently came across that in Navajo, instead you say things like "Where are you going?" and "Why are you here?"

What kinds of greetings and conversation-starters are there in other cultures?

I'm not really interested so much in the linguistic form of the expressions, but rather in the differences of what is considered polite. Greeting someone in English with "Why are you here?" sounds very rude and unfriendly. I don't know if the English expressions sound unfriendly in Navajo as well.

I know I am a little late to the party but here I go anyway

In swedish a translation of the english What are you up to? Vad håller du på med would sound quite rude, especialy (aaarrh! English spelling!) if you don't know the person from before. "How are you" would just sound wierd.

Besides the normal "hi" = "hej", "bye" = "hejdå" (or) "hej hej" there are a few funny ways to greet someone:

Vad är du för en? What kind of [something] are you? Used if you don't know some one's name or who you are

Vad händer? What happens? Kinda the same as "What's up?"

Tjena(re) Well hallo there This one is interesting since it comes from the Swedish word for servent, "tjänare". No idea why

Hur är det? How is it? Kinda the same as "how are you?"
Sadanjatås = I wished we had survived, too bad we didn't


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Aszev
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Re: Greetings

Post by Aszev » Thu 26 Apr 2012, 16:33

Stammalor wrote:Vad är du för en? What kind of [something] are you? Used if you don't know some one's name or who you are
I've never heard this in my entire life.
Stammalor wrote:Tjena(re) Well hallo there This one is interesting since it comes from the Swedish word for servent, "tjänare". No idea why
It's from an older greeting/expression where you'd claim to be someones servant. Parallell developments exist in several European languages, such as Italian ciao and South German servus, Hungarian szervusz.
Sound change works in mysterious ways.

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