Little-Known Countries

Discussions regarding actual culture and history of Earth.
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CrazyEttin
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by CrazyEttin » Thu 12 Apr 2012, 18:35

rickardspaghetti wrote:
CrazyEttin wrote:
Maximillian wrote:
CrazyEttin wrote:I thought, until i was ~12 years old, that Moldova and Timbuktu were just some random made-up countries mentioned in comics or something.
I used to think the same about Timbuktu and Karaganda. In Russian, if you want to say that something is located in a distant, unknown, god-forsaken place, you say "Где? В Караганде!" ("Where? In Karaganda!"). :mrgreen:
Haha. [:D] In finnish you say "Huitsin Nevadassa" (I don't know how to translate "huitsi" and i have absolutely know idea why Nevada is used in this expression)
In Swedish we say "Långtbortistan". "Långt bort" means "far away", and "-istan" is pretty self-explanatory.
I actually knew that!
I always knew it was a good idea to read Moomin comics in swedish instead of finnish. [:D]
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Omzinesý » Thu 12 Apr 2012, 20:53

CrazyEttin wrote:
Maximillian wrote:
CrazyEttin wrote:I thought, until i was ~12 years old, that Moldova and Timbuktu were just some random made-up countries mentioned in comics or something.
I used to think the same about Timbuktu and Karaganda. In Russian, if you want to say that something is located in a distant, unknown, god-forsaken place, you say "Где? В Караганде!" ("Where? In Karaganda!"). :mrgreen:
Haha. [:D] In finnish you say "Huitsin Nevadassa" (I don't know how to translate "huitsi" and i have absolutely know idea why Nevada is used in this expression)
Abolutely out of topic
Finnish has also a saying "Painu Helsinkiin!" 'Go to ?'
I know where the city is, but I really suppose that's so old a saying that Helsinki wasn't a very remarkable place.
Maybe it's a substitution of Hellheim > hell
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Xonen
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Xonen » Thu 12 Apr 2012, 21:12

Omzinesý wrote:Finnish has also a saying "Painu Helsinkiin!"
It does? I've never even heard that one... But then again, there might be a logical reason why such an expression would be missing from my dialect (namely, I live in Helsinki). [:P] In any case, it's quite obviously a G-rated version of painu helvettiin, which simply means 'go to hell'.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by smrk » Mon 16 Apr 2012, 20:49

Xonen wrote:
Omzinesý wrote:Finnish has also a saying "Painu Helsinkiin!"
It does? I've never even heard that one... But then again, there might be a logical reason why such an expression would be missing from my dialect (namely, I live in Helsinki). [:P] In any case, it's quite obviously a G-rated version of painu helvettiin, which simply means 'go to hell'.
Haha. In Czech, there's a very similar expression. You can substitute Prčice, a town in central Bohemia, for "prdel" (ass) in expressions like "Do prdele" ("Go into an ass", but it's similar to "Damn it").

Also, Karaganda is a great name. Like Timbuktu, it just sounds exotic and far away. When I visited Belgrade, I remember there were two buses that I always saw whose final destination was a place called "Karaburma", which was located in "Palilula". I really wanted to go there, because the names just sounded so amazing. Eventually I was talked out of it because they're apparently just ordinary suburban neighborhoods.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Zontas » Tue 17 Apr 2012, 16:44

Altho since about 5 years I have memorized every country by heart, the one most people don't know about is Tuvalu.

For most of every country I know exists, I learned about them while reading The Onion's "Our Dumb World", except Fiji, Marshall Islands, Kosovo, South Sudan and that Tuvalu example above (which are missing for some reason).
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by CrazyEttin » Wed 18 Apr 2012, 07:28

Helios wrote:the one most people don't know about is Tuvalu.
People don't know about Tuvalu?.. [o.O]
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by sangi39 » Wed 18 Apr 2012, 15:22

CrazyEttin wrote:
Helios wrote:the one most people don't know about is Tuvalu.
People don't know about Tuvalu?.. [o.O]
My wife merges /ð/ with /v/, and as a result she pronounces both "Tuvalu" and "too the loo" [tʰu:vəlu:] (or there abouts) which often leads to a few laughs.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Xing » Wed 18 Apr 2012, 15:51

sangi39 wrote:
My wife merges /ð/ with /v/, and as a result she pronounces both "Tuvalu" and "too the loo" [tʰu:vəlu:] (or there abouts) which often leads to a few laughs.
What dialect does she speak? Isn't it quite common that word-initial [ð] becomes [d] or something, even for those with th-fronting in other environments?
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by sangi39 » Wed 18 Apr 2012, 17:34

xingoxa wrote:
sangi39 wrote:
My wife merges /ð/ with /v/, and as a result she pronounces both "Tuvalu" and "too the loo" [tʰu:vəlu:] (or there abouts) which often leads to a few laughs.
What dialect does she speak? Isn't it quite common that word-initial [ð] becomes [d] or something, even for those with th-fronting in other environments?
She's from around High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. Unfortunately neither of her parents have th-fronting and the only own of her friends from around that area that I've met doesn't seem to have th-fronting either, but her accent's a bit more RP-esque. So I can't say whether the use of [və] in place of [ðə] is a feature common to that area or just something specific to her.

She also uses [v] in words like "that", "this", "than" and [f] in "thin", "thick", "thorn", etc.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by prettydragoon » Thu 19 Apr 2012, 06:11

CrazyEttin wrote:
Helios wrote:the one most people don't know about is Tuvalu.
People don't know about Tuvalu?.. [o.O]
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Zontas » Thu 19 Apr 2012, 16:29

sangi39 wrote:
xingoxa wrote:
sangi39 wrote:
My wife merges /ð/ with /v/, and as a result she pronounces both "Tuvalu" and "too the loo" [tʰu:vəlu:] (or there abouts) which often leads to a few laughs.
What dialect does she speak? Isn't it quite common that word-initial [ð] becomes [d] or something, even for those with th-fronting in other environments?
She's from around High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. Unfortunately neither of her parents have th-fronting and the only own of her friends from around that area that I've met doesn't seem to have th-fronting either, but her accent's a bit more RP-esque. So I can't say whether the use of [və] in place of [ðə] is a feature common to that area or just something specific to her.

She also uses [v] in words like "that", "this", "than" and [f] in "thin", "thick", "thorn", etc.
I think that's the Scouse or Estuary dialect.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by SomeoneSomewhere » Thu 19 Apr 2012, 21:45

Helios wrote:
sangi39 wrote:
xingoxa wrote:
sangi39 wrote:
My wife merges /ð/ with /v/, and as a result she pronounces both "Tuvalu" and "too the loo" [tʰu:vəlu:] (or there abouts) which often leads to a few laughs.
What dialect does she speak? Isn't it quite common that word-initial [ð] becomes [d] or something, even for those with th-fronting in other environments?
She's from around High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. Unfortunately neither of her parents have th-fronting and the only own of her friends from around that area that I've met doesn't seem to have th-fronting either, but her accent's a bit more RP-esque. So I can't say whether the use of [və] in place of [ðə] is a feature common to that area or just something specific to her.

She also uses [v] in words like "that", "this", "than" and [f] in "thin", "thick", "thorn", etc.
I think that's the Scouse or Estuary dialect.
Nah, it's not Scouse, I have that accent and we more than often replace [ð] with [d̪] and [θ] with [t̪], mostly. Where I live the majority of the people, me included, say [mat̪s] or [mæt̪s] for [maθs]. But the isn't really that stressed.

I do propose Liverpool should be a country due to the non-connections with the rest of the England. ;p
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by dh3537 » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 03:21

Gaugazia, Transnistria/Transdniester
But these have already been mentioned before...

Montenegro, Macedonia, Sao Tome & Principe
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by sangi39 » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 06:54

SomeoneSomewhere wrote: I do propose Liverpool should be a country due to the non-connections with the rest of the England. ;p
If you listen to some non-scousers, the same thought seems to exist round the rest of the country :p

But yeah, it definitely seems more an Estuary English thing, but like I said, we don't spend a lot of time down that way and I've only met one of her friends. MORE RESEARCH!
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Xing » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 10:38

What would count as a 'country'? Do we include various unrecognised territories and subdivisions? Or only internationally recognised sovereign states?
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Click » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 12:16

I'd say Dominica and Micronesia(sounds more as a geographical term than a name of a country).
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Zontas » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 16:24

Akzálī wrote:I'd say Dominica and Micronesia(sounds more as a geographical term than a name of a country).
Micronesia was on survivor so....
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Xing » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 16:32

'Micronesia' can refer either to a state, The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), or to a larger geographical area, adjacent to Polynesia and Melanesia. This larger area includes, apart from the FSM, the independent states of Nauru, Marshall Island, a part of Kiribati, and a few other states and territories.
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by SomeoneSomewhere » Fri 20 Apr 2012, 21:24

sangi39 wrote:
SomeoneSomewhere wrote: I do propose Liverpool should be a country due to the non-connections with the rest of the England. ;p
If you listen to some non-scousers, the same thought seems to exist round the rest of the country :p
Aside from linguistically, I was more thinking the cultural and political affiliations, let alone to mention that more than half of my friends don't have English surnames, including myself. :3
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Re: Little-Known Countries

Post by Curlyjimsam » Thu 31 May 2012, 20:58

CrazyEttin wrote:I thought, until i was ~12 years old, that Moldova and Timbuktu were just some random made-up countries mentioned in comics or something.
When I was very young (about six), I used to think Timbuktu was in Scotland.
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