What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

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Scytheria
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Scytheria » Sat 22 Sep 2018, 01:26

fruityloops wrote:
Wed 19 Sep 2018, 11:36
i just noticed something, a lot of people have been suggesting i use fungus as mounts for some apparent reason. like a i understand most birds eat but...a fungus? sorry your suggestion's great but it's little...strange? i might keep it.
Well, there's precedence for real-world bugs cultivating fungus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fungus-growing_ants
I went for a ride on a spaceship [O.O]
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fruityloops
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by fruityloops » Tue 25 Sep 2018, 14:26

Scytheria wrote:
Sat 22 Sep 2018, 01:26
fruityloops wrote:
Wed 19 Sep 2018, 11:36
i just noticed something, a lot of people have been suggesting i use fungus as mounts for some apparent reason. like a i understand most birds eat but...a fungus? sorry your suggestion's great but it's little...strange? i might keep it.
Well, there's precedence for real-world bugs cultivating fungus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fungus-growing_ants

dang it. i recall something like that way back when i was a kid. thanks for more world building inspiration.
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Wed 26 Sep 2018, 04:45

Creyeditor wrote:
Wed 19 Sep 2018, 17:47
I just had an idea. What about very small bats? It seems that some species of bat are only a few centimeters large, if you check Wiki.
Also there's Homopus, the smallest tortoise.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homopus_signatus

On the other end of the scale, ants could get as big as Carpenter Ants, or bigger. I just had a bout with some Carpenter Ants in my house. They're quite larger than the smaller black and brown and red ants. They're easier to kill, too [}:D]

The largest ants are the Dinoponerans of South America, which see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinoponera




IMHO sentient insects might stick closer to breeding other insects for food or draft, or companionship.
Carboniferous… the time of mists
Interesting. Quite possibly b/c there was more oxygen (ozone?) in the atmosphere. Back then, paleo-ecologists have suggested that the level of oxygen in the atmosphere was higher, and thus much larger species of insect and arthropod (e.g. Meganeura, Arthropleura, etc) could have existed on land, and grown to much larger than modern sizes.

But then there's this, which I just found out about:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamergate#Etymology
:!: [O.O] :?:
Wow. Always something new under the Sun!


----------------------------------------------

On another note, I do not think that a planet could support 30-some sentient species for long.
It's not impossible to contemplate that, throughout Earth's history, 30 very different species might have, at certain moments in the billions of years of prehistory, arisen, swelled into civilizations, and then perished as fossil Ozymandians, lost in the dusts of Time. They would never have seen, and possibly have found no evidence of one another at all.

On another other note, while it seems from fossil record that multiple rather intelligent hominins co-existed alongside Homo sapiens, it seems that we either hunted, slaughtered, or mated those other species (e.g. Neanderthals ) to extinction. SO it might seem that sentience breeds contempt, to some degree.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by eldin raigmore » Thu 27 Sep 2018, 11:47

Lambuzhao wrote:
Wed 26 Sep 2018, 04:45
But then there's this, which I just found out about:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamergate#Etymology
:!: [O.O] :?:
Wow. Always something new under the Sun!
So it’s the gam from monogamy, with the erg from energy, then the ate from potentate etc.

When I first saw it, I thought it was some Watergate-like scandal having to do with RPG-players or video GamersGate.

But no. It’s about Erasmus B. Dragon’s working mothers’ support group.
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sat 29 Sep 2018, 16:23

Egg-laying Wedded Workers of the World: become One and Win!
(if ever Hymenopterid Communism* were to exist, well… there it is, innit? :wat: )
{*Antish Share 'n' Share Alike Folkfellowdom, for the Anglish out there (?) }
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sat 29 Sep 2018, 16:28

Recently, I have become fascinated with eusociality in modern gall-forming thrips, and evidence of gymnosperm pollen-collection in Mesozoic Thysanopterans (?!)

WHo knew?!? [o.O]
Some amazing stuff out there on the Interretial Event Horizon. [;)]
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by elemtilas » Sun 30 Sep 2018, 02:48

Lambuzhao wrote:
Sat 29 Sep 2018, 16:28
Recently, I have become fascinated with eusociality in modern gall-forming thrips, and evidence of gymnosperm pollen-collection in Mesozoic Thysanopterans (?!)

WHo knew?!? [o.O]
Some amazing stuff out there on the Interretial Event Horizon. [;)]
[O.O]

Wow. Can we have an interlinear of that first sentence!? Do I even want to know what a gall forming thrip is?? [O.o] Sounds like some kind of eternally grouchy Fairy.
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If we stuff the whole chicken back into the egg, will all our problems go away? --- Wandalf of Angera
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sun 30 Sep 2018, 19:37

elemtilas wrote:
Sun 30 Sep 2018, 02:48
Lambuzhao wrote:
Sat 29 Sep 2018, 16:28
Recently, I have become fascinated with eusociality in modern gall-forming thrips, and evidence of gymnosperm pollen-collection in Mesozoic Thysanopterans (?!)

WHo knew?!? [o.O]
Some amazing stuff out there on the Interretial Event Horizon. [;)]
[O.O]

Wow. Can we have an interlinear of that first sentence!? [O.o] Sounds like some kind of eternally grouchy Fairy.
Sure
In these past days, I have been taken by the kingdomlike behavior shown in modern Thunderflies though I like Grouchfairies at least as much, if not more that make their homes in tree-cankers, as well as the evidence of thunderflies from dinosaur times that harvested pollen from cone-bearing trees.
Do I even want to know what a gall forming thrip is??
From a number of their more common names:

Thunderblights, corn fleas, corn flies, corn lice, freckle bugs, harvest bugs

you'd want to know especially if you were a farmer, gardener or orchardist.

But if I recall rightly, thrips tend to induce galls mainly in leguminous trees, e.g. Acacia, Mesquite.


There is evidence in Cretaceous amber that exinct species of Thunderflies had rudimentary pollen basket-like structures:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4509684/

while pollen-baskets are not a surefire evidence that those thunderflies were social, it's interesting to note that, apart from bees, thysanopterans (collectively,at least) also hit upon social behavior, and rather specialized pollen collection. :wat:

Still yet more wonderful things to be trawled out of the farthest knots and meshes of the Internet.
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elemtilas
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by elemtilas » Sun 30 Sep 2018, 20:14

Lambuzhao wrote:
Sun 30 Sep 2018, 19:37
elemtilas wrote:
Sun 30 Sep 2018, 02:48
Lambuzhao wrote:
Sat 29 Sep 2018, 16:28
Recently, I have become fascinated with eusociality in modern gall-forming thrips, and evidence of gymnosperm pollen-collection in Mesozoic Thysanopterans (?!)

WHo knew?!? [o.O]
Some amazing stuff out there on the Interretial Event Horizon. [;)]
[O.O]

Wow. Can we have an interlinear of that first sentence!? [O.o] Sounds like some kind of eternally grouchy Fairy.
Sure
In these past days, I have been taken by the kingdomlike behavior shown in modern Thunderflies though I like Grouchfairies at least as much, if not more that make their homes in tree-cankers, as well as the evidence of thunderflies from dinosaur times that harvested pollen from cone-bearing trees.
Coo, neat wing design! Like an single downy feather.

Hmm...grouchfairies...
Do I even want to know what a gall forming thrip is??
From a number of their more common names:

Thunderblights, corn fleas, corn flies, corn lice, freckle bugs, harvest bugs

you'd want to know especially if you were a farmer, gardener or orchardist.

But if I recall rightly, thrips tend to induce galls mainly in leguminous trees, e.g. Acacia, Mesquite.
Hunh. Well, no orchids, acacias or mequites hereabouts. Though there is a kind of thrip that appears locally, I've never seen them, based on pictures I looked up. But a fascinating little bug all the same. And a completely different mechanism of flight as compared to others. The one that looks like a little winged scorpion is interesting. I like their elongated form: will have to consider what Thunderflies look like in The World.

In any event, their clap & fling method of flight led to this article which demonstrated I think how the flying towers of the Daine work. Though they grow theirs from plants, not bugs.

Still yet more wonderful things to be trawled out of the farthest knots and meshes of the Internet.
Right?
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Kehgrehdid » Mon 15 Oct 2018, 01:30

Fwiw, centipedes have excellent speed compared to most other arthropods. If the smartbugs could figure out a way to muzzle or tame them, it could lead to faster ground transportation.
"Cry me a river, build me a bridge, and get over it."

I marvel that the hardest parts of my life (fear, mistakes, guilt, sin, doubt, failure) are of man, while what I crave most (rest, hope, love, peace, forgiveness) are of God.
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Mon 15 Oct 2018, 11:24

Kehgrehdid wrote:
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 01:30
Fwiw, centipedes have excellent speed compared to most other arthropods. If the smartbugs could figure out a way to muzzle or tame them, it could lead to faster ground transportation.
House Centipedes are clocked at 1.3 ft/sec

That's pretty darn fast! :wat:

Rope them doagies!
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Re: What would humanoid bugs use as mounts?

Post by Lambuzhao » Mon 15 Oct 2018, 11:26

Scytheria wrote:
Sat 22 Sep 2018, 01:26
fruityloops wrote:
Wed 19 Sep 2018, 11:36
i just noticed something, a lot of people have been suggesting i use fungus as mounts for some apparent reason. like a i understand most birds eat but...a fungus? sorry your suggestion's great but it's little...strange? i might keep it.
Well, there's precedence for real-world bugs cultivating fungus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fungus-growing_ants
Maybe they use the fungus as a navigation system to hack into another insect as a ride, like they domesticated a strain of the zombie-ant fungus?
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