Yay or Nay?

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qwed117
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by qwed117 » Sat 30 Sep 2017, 04:20

Ælfwine wrote:I do love front rounded vowels. [<3]
qwed117 wrote:
Ælfwine wrote:Should I introduce front rounded vowels to my Hungarian inspired romlang?

I could easily innovate them from /wE/ and /wI/ like in the word /'battwErE/ > modern /'bat2r/ <batör>
I'd imagine the more Frenchy route of el and il are also possibilities. You should seek out multiple paths, not just one.
[O.o] I'm not sure how Italian definite articles play into this? Unless this is /eI/ /iI/ you are talking about.
Lol, yes that's what I'm referring to. Tmk, /el/ and /il/ both became /ø/ in some circumstances.
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All4Ɇn
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by All4Ɇn » Mon 09 Oct 2017, 19:27

Right now I'm working on the pronunciation of the character 啞 in Ởnh·Vú and right now I have 2 possibilities:

1. It's usually pronounced as /a˦˧˥/ except when used as an adjectival verb meaning mute/dumb where it can be pronounced either as /a˦˧˥/ or /so˧˩˧/ depending on dialect and personal preference and many people may use both interchangeably

2. It's usually pronounced as /a˦˧˥/ but has 2 pronunciations when used as an adjective: /so˧˩˧/ when used to mean mute/dumb and /a˦˧˥/ when being used as an insult equivalent to calling some dumb/stupid/etc.

Which one do you guys think I should go with?
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qwed117
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by qwed117 » Mon 09 Oct 2017, 23:44

All4Ɇn wrote:Right now I'm working on the pronunciation of the character 啞 in Ởnh·Vú and right now I have 2 possibilities:

1. It's usually pronounced as /a˦˧˥/ except when used as an adjectival verb meaning mute/dumb where it can be pronounced either as /a˦˧˥/ or /so˧˩˧/ depending on dialect and personal preference and many people may use both interchangeably

2. It's usually pronounced as /a˦˧˥/ but has 2 pronunciations when used as an adjective: /so˧˩˧/ when used to mean mute/dumb and /a˦˧˥/ when being used as an insult equivalent to calling some dumb/stupid/etc.

Which one do you guys think I should go with?
Where did /a˦˧˥/ and /so˧˩˧/ come from? Do they both mean mute?

I think that option 1 is probably the best. Dialectal differences in register are common throughout the world.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by shimobaatar » Mon 09 Oct 2017, 23:46

I prefer option 2, personally.
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All4Ɇn
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by All4Ɇn » Mon 09 Oct 2017, 23:54

qwed117 wrote:Where did /a˦˧˥/ and /so˧˩˧/ come from? Do they both mean mute?
The first is borrowed from Chinese, the second is native. Both mean mute.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by qwed117 » Tue 10 Oct 2017, 00:22

All4Ɇn wrote:
qwed117 wrote:Where did /a˦˧˥/ and /so˧˩˧/ come from? Do they both mean mute?
The first is borrowed from Chinese, the second is native. Both mean mute.
If that is the case, then I definitely think that /a˦˧˥/ should be used to mean mute in a more formal sense, with /so˧˩˧/ being used in certain dialects to indicate an insult
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Frislander » Tue 10 Oct 2017, 00:26

I concur, definitely use the Sinitic borrowing for the more formal situations, the power relations are just too unequal in the scenario for simple dialectal variation.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by All4Ɇn » Tue 10 Oct 2017, 01:14

Frislander wrote:I concur, definitely use the Sinitic borrowing for the more formal situations, the power relations are just too unequal in the scenario for simple dialectal variation.
I think I'll with that option then. Do you think it'd be weird for the /a˦˧˥/ pronunciation to also occur in some compound words that act as insults such as 啞馬 [a˦˧˥ ma˧˥] (~dumbass/moron)? I think the /a˦˧˥/ pronunciation sounds a lot better there than something like /so˧˩˧ ma˧˥/
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by qwed117 » Tue 10 Oct 2017, 02:03

All4Ɇn wrote:
Frislander wrote:I concur, definitely use the Sinitic borrowing for the more formal situations, the power relations are just too unequal in the scenario for simple dialectal variation.
I think I'll with that option then. Do you think it'd be weird for the /a˦˧˥/ pronunciation to also occur in some compound words that act as insults such as 啞馬 [a˦˧˥ ma˧˥] (~dumbass/moron)? I think the /a˦˧˥/ pronunciation sounds a lot better there than something like /so˧˩˧ ma˧˥/
both make sense.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Parlox » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 00:06

Is using /ꝥ/ to represent [t͡θ] a good idea? This idea comes from from old english using /ꝥ/ as a abbreviation for þæt.
My main conlangs are Podmåri, and Gwynwth.
i have several other smaller conlangs, such as Nymburun, Makǔdorın, Migyur, Padna'vi , and Bolkiēnōgothic.
Along with a unnamed sign language, and multiple conlangs that are on hold.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Click » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 00:29

Definitely.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Ælfwine » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 00:45

Could a language gain an aspiration contrast from clusters with silibants?

I.e. ps ts ks > pʰ tʰ kʰ

Looks reasonable to me but idk
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Porphyrogenitos » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 04:16

Ælfwine wrote:Could a language gain an aspiration contrast from clusters with silibants?

I.e. ps ts ks > pʰ tʰ kʰ

Looks reasonable to me but idk
Yeah, that looks fine to me. It's pretty much just a debuccalization of /s/ to /h/.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Parlox » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 04:49

Do any languages make a alignment distinction where masculine nouns use a marked nominative alignment, but feminine nouns use a marked accusative and neuter nouns use a marked genitive?
My main conlangs are Podmåri, and Gwynwth.
i have several other smaller conlangs, such as Nymburun, Makǔdorın, Migyur, Padna'vi , and Bolkiēnōgothic.
Along with a unnamed sign language, and multiple conlangs that are on hold.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by eldin raigmore » Thu 12 Oct 2017, 05:32

Parlox wrote:Do any languages make a alignment distinction where masculine nouns use a marked nominative alignment, but feminine nouns use a marked accusative and neuter nouns use a marked genitive?
If you make one, the answer will be "yes".
....
Some natlangs do have a hierarchy of nouns/nominals/pronouns/pronominals that are accusative/nominative at the top and ergative/absolutive at the bottom.
If the hierarchy happens to be Fem > Masc > Neut, I guess that could be similar to what you're suggesting; or at least could look similar if you squint.

Have you tried looking at WALS.info for such a 'lang?
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by qwed117 » Mon 23 Oct 2017, 05:39

I'm thinking of adding /r̥ l̥ j̊ ẘ/ <hr hl hj hw> to one of my langs.
Here's the phonology for reference:
/m m̊ n n̊ ŋ ŋ̊/ <m mh n nh ñ ñh>
/p t̪ t k b d̪ d g/ <p ṭ t k b ḍ d g>
/s ś h j w ɰ ɾ/ <s ś h j w ġ r>
/a ɛ e i u o ɤ/ <a e è i u o à>
Should I
A) leave them out
B) put them all in
C) put only <hr hl> in
D) put only <hj hw> in
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by eldin raigmore » Wed 25 Oct 2017, 22:02

qwed117 wrote: I'm thinking of adding /r̥ l̥ j̊ ẘ/ <hr hl hj hw> to one of my langs.
Here's the phonology for reference:
/m m̊ n n̊ ŋ ŋ̊/ <m mh n nh ñ ñh>
/p t̪ t k b d̪ d g/ <p ṭ t k b ḍ d g>
/s ś h j w ɰ ɾ/ <s ś h j w ġ r>
/a ɛ e i u o ɤ/ <a e è i u o à>
Should I
A) leave them out
B) put them all in
C) put only <hr hl> in
D) put only <hj hw> in
My non-logical "gut" instinct is:
(C) would make your 'lang more different -- more "it's own thing";
but (s/b "and"?)
(B) would be more aesthetically pleasing -- to me.

I kinda think (A) would make your conspeakers' version of Alpha-Bits (TM) a lot less interesting and educational for their schoolchildren.

(OTOH how does Post's Greek division handle the uppercase xi Ξ or theta Θ ?)
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by Davush » Thu 26 Oct 2017, 17:45

I don't know whether I want to introduce /ŋ/ into Qutrussan? I would probably romanise it as <ṇ>. If yes, should I also allow it word-initially? I tend to put it in conlangs a lot, but it feels a bit out of place in Qutrussan. Words like ṇuthur /ŋuθur/ sound nice though. If I do, I think /i u/ will have centralised/merged with /ǝ/ before it in the not-so-distant past, so things like yŭṇ /jǝŋ/ and rĭṇ /rǝŋ/.

Also, I am thinking about letting /ts dz/ function as fricatives when it comes to clusters, so things like /tsn dzg/ would be permissible.
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by DesEsseintes » Thu 26 Oct 2017, 19:51

Davush wrote:I don't know whether I want to introduce /ŋ/ into Qutrussan? I would probably romanise it as <ṇ>. If yes, should I also allow it word-initially? I tend to put it in conlangs a lot, but it feels a bit out of place in Qutrussan. Words like ṇuthur /ŋuθur/ sound nice though. If I do, I think /i u/ will have centralised/merged with /ǝ/ before it in the not-so-distant past, so things like yŭṇ /jǝŋ/ and rĭṇ /rǝŋ/.
Nay
Also, I am thinking about letting /ts dz/ function as fricatives when it comes to clusters, so things like /tsn dzg/ would be permissible.
Yay oh yay!
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Re: Yay or Nay?

Post by gestaltist » Fri 27 Oct 2017, 08:55

Davush wrote:I don't know whether I want to introduce /ŋ/ into Qutrussan? I would probably romanise it as <ṇ>. If yes, should I also allow it word-initially? I tend to put it in conlangs a lot, but it feels a bit out of place in Qutrussan. Words like ṇuthur /ŋuθur/ sound nice though. If I do, I think /i u/ will have centralised/merged with /ǝ/ before it in the not-so-distant past, so things like yŭṇ /jǝŋ/ and rĭṇ /rǝŋ/.
How about making [ŋ] the word-initial allophone of /g/?
Also, I am thinking about letting /ts dz/ function as fricatives when it comes to clusters, so things like /tsn dzg/ would be permissible.
I like it.
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