What would the English equivalent be?

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Khemehekis
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What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis » Sun 03 Feb 2013, 08:49

This is a thread where people can ask for translations for conlang words that they don't know the English for. For example, if someone asks what mnimuk, the word in her conlang for the vertical dent between the nose and upper lip, is called, someone with the knowledge could post and tell her that the English word is philtrum.
Last edited by Khemehekis on Sun 18 Feb 2018, 04:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis » Sun 03 Feb 2013, 08:58

I need an English equivalent for the Kankonian bmang. "Bmang" is to listening what the English word "to show" is to looking. It's a verb for having someone listen to something.

Example:

Is trayas bmang ad ar vitsh prin dyu Nirvana na is.
1sg have_to-PRS bmang to 2sg track new by Nirvana of 1sg
I've got to let you listen to my new Nirvana track.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 57,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sun 03 Feb 2013, 09:24

Causatives! Oooooooooh.
Hmmm....

Some English examples come to mind (especially if talking about recorded/performed music in particular)-

I've got to play my new Nirvana track for you.

I've got to broadcast my new Nirvana track.

I've got to expose you to my new Nirvana track.

[Slang] I've got to hep you to my new Nirvana track.

**If it were some kind of spoken message specifically, then maybe -

I've got to tell you about my new Nirvana poem.

I've just got to proclaim my new Nirvana poem to you.

I got the last two from googling "cause to hear" and coptic and hebrew, from which I got hits of Biblical lexica.
Coptic and Hebrew still are chock-a-block of causative verb forms.

PS -
Also could be -
I've got to announce my new Nirvana poem to you.

I've got to relate my new Nirvana poem to you.

I've got to inform you about my new Nirvana track (which really does NOT mean that you're going to hear it)

PPS-
Interestingly, Arabic, Bengala, Malayalim and Hindi list rehearse as a synonym for their verbs for "cause to hear".

Wow, what a trip.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Salmoneus » Sun 03 Feb 2013, 13:19

Or just "I've got to have you listen to..." or "I've got to make you listen to..."
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by kiwikami » Mon 04 Feb 2013, 23:34

If there's an English word for HyPry's lèɯıβo, I would be very happy to know it.
I define it in my lexicon as "the frustration encountered when trying to explain a concept in a language that a) doesn't have the right words for it or b) you don't know well enough to discuss the concept."

For example, me trying to gloss HyPry, or me trying to talk about quantum mechanics in French.
(It's felt rather often by Time Lords interacting with lesser species, and they tend to slip into Gallifreyan when explaining something technical out of an instinct to avoid it. [It's also why most of what the Doctor says sounds like technobabble - he's sick of his explanations not translating well, so he's given up trying to makes sense.] Colloquially, at least in the Big Three dialects, it also refers to BSing one's way through a technical conversation by pretending to understand everything that is being said, even though you don't actually know a word of the jargon or anything about a topic.)
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Tue 05 Feb 2013, 04:48

I bet Douglas Adams has a word for it in Liff.

1) I would proffer bloviation-frustration, but that would be due to a combination of prolixity and pomposity. I think yours is more of an anxiety at the inadequacy/paucity of the verbiage in question.

2) I would steal the word contrafibularity from Mr. Edmund Blackadder himself, and use it as such.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis » Wed 07 May 2014, 09:01

Luckily for me, I was able to locate this thread because I've got a new word today.

The Kankonian word is tukheb. "Tukheb" is defined as a slave who is sacrificed so s/he can be buried along with her/his master when the slavemaster dies. I don't know where to start looking for the English equivalent.

And by the way, "tukheb" was borrowed into Kankonian from a civilization that has slavery. There's no way the Kankonians would ever bring back slavery.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 57,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Incorruptus » Wed 07 May 2014, 14:31

Khemehekis wrote:Luckily for me, I was able to locate this thread because I've got a new word today.

The Kankonian word is tukheb. "Tukheb" is defined as a slave who is sacrificed so s/he can be buried along with her/his master when the slavemaster dies. I don't know where to start looking for the English equivalent.

And by the way, "tukheb" was borrowed into Kankonian from a civilization that has slavery. There's no way the Kankonians would ever bring back slavery.
The only thing that this sounds like is something Egyptian, or any other variant, to me...the bottom line is, a new loanword might need to be made if you wish to convey your point.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Wed 07 May 2014, 17:59

How about "loyal bootlicker until the very end" ?
Not very PC, I know. [¬.¬]
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Wed 07 May 2014, 18:03

All joshing aside,
I thought of "co-interred"
and there seems to actually be an English word "cointerred".
Buried together, then?

Does not include a connotation of difference in social status between interred and cointerred, though.

Back to the drawing board.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by samstyan99 » Wed 07 May 2014, 18:06

śádɛnfɛrodyrénõϩεl̥

'He probably would have feel pleasure from seeing someone else’s misfortune.'

This is a conjugation of the verb 'śádɛnfɛrodǫ', which means 'to felt pleasure from seeing someone else’s misfortune' and it comes from the German word 'schadenfreude'. Otarantya (my conlang) isn't really based on German, but this word had such a cool meaning I had to add it into my conlang!

I wonder if anybody can think of an English equivalent?



P.S. this font doesn't support Coptic characters so that's why one of the letters looks a bit funny!
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Khemehekis
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 05:17

What's a more general term than "Gnoli triangle"? A word for an equilateral triangle chart to show balance among three things.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 57,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Thrice Xandvii
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Thrice Xandvii » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 05:53

We use the word schadenfreude in English as well. Boring I know, but that's how English is.

Also, you seem to have reversed your uses of "feel" the first instance in your post should be "felt" while the second should be "feel."
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lao Kou » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 06:44

Thrice Xandvii wrote:We use the word schadenfreude in English as well. Boring I know, but that's how English is. Also, you seem to have reversed your uses of "feel" the first instance in your post should be "felt" while the second should be "feel."
With a one-day hit of five posts nigh a year ago, I shouldn't expect a lot of editing. [xP]
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Thrice Xandvii » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 06:49

I suppose not. Guess I didn't realize what an epic-level necro the post previous to mine was!
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Prinsessa » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 09:56

samstyan99 wrote:śádɛnfɛrodyrénõϩεl̥

'He probably would have feel pleasure from seeing someone else’s misfortune.'
Swedish: 'han var nog skadeglad'. That' it. :d
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by QuantumWraith » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 10:27

Thrice Xandvii wrote:I suppose not. Guess I didn't realize what an epic-level necro the post previous to mine was!
Speaking of necro..
Khemehekis wrote:What's a more general term than "Gnoli triangle"? A word for an equilateral triangle chart to show balance among three things.
I want to say "triforce" but now I'm bringing up A Link to the Past... :D
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Prinsessa » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 13:06

QuantumWraith wrote:
Khemehekis wrote:What's a more general term than "Gnoli triangle"? A word for an equilateral triangle chart to show balance among three things.
I want to say "triforce" but now I'm bringing up A Link to the Past... :D
You're bringing up almost every title in the series, in fact. c;

Great answer and solution! [tick]
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 13:45

Khemehekis wrote:This is a thread where people can ask for translations for conlang words that they don't know the English for. For example, if someone asks what mnimuk, the word in their conlang for the vertical dent between the nose and upper lip, is called, someone with the knowledge could post and tell her that the English word is philtrum.
Apart from general dictionary sources, you might consult these two alternate resources:

Rich Hall Sniglets

Douglas Adams The Meaning of Liff

each book has had at least two sequels. There are plenty of fansites for these invaluable [;)] resources.

E.g.

Rich Hall gives the very region of which you speak the kenning sniffleridge.
Douglas Adams goes a step further, and names the two vertical lines that form the philtral ridges themselves Des Moines.

Do you have a word in Kankonian for Adam's Des Moines?
If not, you should.
[:)]

Another couple of sites to mine include
The Luciferous Logolepsy
The Phrontistery
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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao » Sun 29 Mar 2015, 14:04

QuantumWraith wrote:
Thrice Xandvii wrote:I suppose not. Guess I didn't realize what an epic-level necro the post previous to mine was!
Speaking of necro..
Khemehekis wrote:What's a more general term than "Gnoli triangle"? A word for an equilateral triangle chart to show balance among three things.
I want to say "triforce" but now I'm bringing up A Link to the Past... :D

Among other things, this type of diagram is generally called either a Triangle Plot Diagram, Triangle Plot, Ternary Diagram, Ternary Plot, Ternary Graph, Simplex Plot, Tri-Plot, or de Finetti diagram, but IMHO Triforce makes as much, if not more, sense.

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/microsites/resea ... t/fig1.png

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/maillists/tmap ... qdDwYG.jpg

http://www.sepmstrata.org/CMS_Images/Co ... read-f.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_plot
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