Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

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All4Ɇn
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Mon 16 Jul 2018, 21:11

Khemehekis wrote:
Mon 16 Jul 2018, 04:02
Speaking of Rites of Passage, how about a list of age/gender terms for Ởnh·Vú?
Here are those words below [:)]

胎兒 (Tứy·ne)- Fetus
新生 (Sin·rành)- Newborn
卑ヌ (Bé·bé)- Baby
嬰兒 (Enh·ne)- Baby (formal)
幼兒 (Ù·ne)- Toddler
穉 (Đã)- Child/kid
兒童 (Ne·đunh)- Child/kid (formal)
𡛔𡥵 (Bính·ãc)- Girl (also means daughter)
仉𡥵 (Ta·ãc)- Boy (also means son)
少年 (Xờ·nen)- Teenager/adolescent
穉ヌ (Đã·đã)- Youth/children
廿歲飫𧶮𠊛 (Nip xờy ꞗẽ mờ ởnh)- Twentysomething
三十歲飫𧶮𠊛 (Sam·gip xờy ꞗẽ mờ ởnh)- Thirtysomething
𡘯𠊛 (Sỏnh·ởnh)- Adult
成年者 (Genh·nen·chá)- Adult (formal)
𡛔 (In)- Woman
仉奴 (Ta·no)- Man
𦓅 (Tủo)- Old man/male senior (also means grandfather)
𦓅𡛔 (Tủo·in)- Old woman/female senior (also means grandmother)
𦓅ヌ𡛔 (Tủo·tủo·in)- The elderly/senior citizens (also means grandparents)
屍體 (Xi·téy)- Corpse
夫人 (Pưo·nin)- Lady
妸(Gã)/儿妸 (Ra·gã)- Guy/fellow
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Fri 20 Jul 2018, 06:47

Birth Order
You can think of these terms as an extension of the kinship terms posted earlier. Similar to other languages in the Sinosphere, it's pretty weird in Ởnh·Vú to address or refer to family members by their names. Instead, kinship terms are applied. A question arises though when you want to talk about a family member when multiple kinship terms are applied to them. When this arises, prefixes are applied to the kinship term to indicate the order of the person's birth. Below are the different prefixes.
哿 (Sa)- Firstborn
次 (Tì)- Second-born
三 (Sam)- Third-born
𦊚 (Pãt)- Fourth-born
...
崴 (Truc)- Lastborn

For those between fourth-born and last born, typically the Sinic form of the number is used. The only exceptions (which would almost never be used) are for numbers that end in four which instead use the native form of the number instead such as 𨑮𦊚 (sủ·pãt) for fourteenth born. This is due to tetraphobia (similar to how it is in Japan and China) caused by the Sinic word four, 四 (sì) having a pronunciation very similar to that for death 死 (sí). Here are samples with different family members:
哿偀 (Sa ay)- Firstborn older sibling
次仉㛪怡 (Tì ta·a·dì)- Second-born younger brother
𦊚㛪怡 (Pãt a·dì)- Fourth-born younger sibling
崴伯𡛔 (Truc ủit·in)- Lastborn aunt (on father's side)
三二𡛔𡥵 (Sam nì·bính·ãc)- Third-born step-daughter
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by Khemehekis » Sun 22 Jul 2018, 03:14

All4Ɇn wrote:
Mon 16 Jul 2018, 21:11
少年 (Xờ·nen)- Teenager/adolescent
[O.O]

This never occurred to me before, but does our Xonen's name come from the Sino-Japanese word for lad/boy/youth?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 57,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Tue 24 Jul 2018, 07:22

Khemehekis wrote:
Sun 22 Jul 2018, 03:14
All4Ɇn wrote:
Mon 16 Jul 2018, 21:11
少年 (Xờ·nen)- Teenager/adolescent
[O.O]

This never occurred to me before, but does our Xonen's name come from the Sino-Japanese word for lad/boy/youth?
It very well might! Maybe they'll see your message and we'll know for sure [:)]
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Tue 31 Jul 2018, 05:53

Vocative Particle 唉 (Si)
This particle is almost unused in everyday speech but is very common in speeches, poetry, law, prayers, and literature where they are commonly used in set phrases. In everyday speech it's far less likely to be encountered as it usually sounds patronizing. The patronizing can be seen in the phrases 唉㛪怡 (si a·dì) and 唉偀 (si ay) which are both used to rudely call out to a woman. Because of this, it’s far more common to use job titles and kinship terms based on the age of the person in question instead of the vocative. Some common expressions which use the vocative are the following:

唉陛下 (Si béy·á)- Your Highness/your Majesty/sire
唉朋友 (Si bơnh·hú)- Friends
唉父 (Si bứo)- Father (catholicism)
唉佛 (Si but)- Buddha
唉主 (Si chó)- God
唉主席 (Si chó·rec)- Honorable Mr(s). Chairman
唉公民 (Si cunh·min)- Fellow citizens
唉同胞 (Si đunh·bào)- Fellow countrymen/fellow compatriots/brethren
唉同志 (Si đunh·chừ)- Comrades
唉同業 (Si đunh·nưp)- Fellow colleagues
唉全世界𧶮無產者 (Si giuin·xè·ghèy mờ mưo·rén·chá)- Workers of the world
唉閣下 (Si nừy·á)- Your Excellency
唉𠊛ヌ (Si ởnh·ởnh)- Everyone
唉庯唄庯女 (Si po nanh po·vú)- Ladies and gentlemen
唉𠏥 (Si pão)- Sir (very formal)/your Honor/master/sire/my Lord
唉總統 (Si túnh·tũonh)- Mr(s). President
唉議長 (Si vè·tránh)- Mr(s). Chairman or Mr(s). Speaker
唉聖母 (Si xènh·mứ)- Hail Mary
唉首相 (Si xù·sừnh)- Mr(s). Prime Minister
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Fri 03 Aug 2018, 13:40

Cham vs. Ởnh·Vú
Considering how many changes Ởnh·Vú has undergone from proto-Chamic, I figured it'd be a good idea to compare it to another Chamic language. Below are samples from Cham alongside romanized Ởnh·Vú. Cognates are color-coded while Ởnh·Vú words from Chinese are colored gold.

My family has ten members
Kruusaa roboh lɨn hou samaceh haploh rang
family POSS 1s have member one-ten CL

Hũnh mờ sãnh·tenh a sủ nin genh·quon
1s POSS house-people have ten CL member


This car, I wash
Laan ni kaw rang raw
car DEM 1s CL wash

Ni chéy dõc, ro
DEM car TOP 1s wash



Did you hear the dog bark?
Həɨ mata mɨt saw kroh raj?
2s have hear dog bark Q

Hanh hớ so yớ?
2s hear dog bark Q



Who gave him that banana?
Hay rang praj pataj nɨn naaw kɨt?
who CL give banana DEM go 3s

đĩ ba·chí lảt cơ nu?
who give DEM bananaí go PREP 3s



Two green apples
Poh pɔɔm poa caaw toa poh
CL apple color green two CL

Đư gio mờ ã·
two CL green PREP summer-fruit



The man I saw yesterday works at the post office
Lakaj kɔng lɨn boh maproj ɲaʔ pruʔ tɔɔʔ presni
man REL 1s see yesterday do work PREP post.office

Hũnh tũ·rí mờ ta·no vữ đi hu·gưoc
1s see yesterday PREP man work PREP post.office
Last edited by All4Ɇn on Fri 10 Aug 2018, 22:37, edited 10 times in total.
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by k1234567890y » Fri 03 Aug 2018, 13:43

wow

that's really a big change.

I hope I can be as persistent as you in making threads of conlangs, btw.
私のアツい人工言語活動!言カツ!始まります!!
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Fri 03 Aug 2018, 13:50

k1234567890y wrote:
Fri 03 Aug 2018, 13:43
wow

that's really a big change.

I hope I can be as persistent as you in making threads of conlangs, btw.
Thanks so much! Really appreciate it [:)]. I myself didn’t realize how big the changes were until I started to compare the languages. Some dialects of Cham seem to be more similar to it than others.
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Re: Ởnh·Vú- Chamic Language

Post by All4Ɇn » Sat 11 Aug 2018, 03:06

Pronunciation of /ʂ~s/ and /ʐ~z/
In my first post in this thread, I mentioned that the phonemes written with <s r> are pronounced as /ʂ~s/ and /ʐ~z/, but I never went into specifics as to when to pronounce them in these ways. I've finally gotten around to figuring out (for the most part) all the complications of these 2 phonemes. The pronunciation of these sounds is the biggest difference between the typical phonology between men and women. Generally the pronunciations [ʂ ʐ] are associated with men while the pronunciations [s̪ z̪] are associated with women. Because of this, in media these pronunciations may occasionally be used in places outside of their normal distribution to stress the femininity/masculinity of the speaker. The different pronunciations below are the ones that would typically occur in spoken language and are sorted by the medial vowel following the sound.

/i/
M: [s͇ z͇]
F: [s̪ʲ~s̪ z̪]

/e ɨ ə/
M: [s͇ z͇]
F: [s̪~s͇ z̪~z͇]

/a u/
M: [s͇~ʂ z͇~ʐ]
F: [s͇ z͇]

/o/
M: [s͇~ʂ z͇~ʐ]
F: [s̪~s͇ z̪~z͇]

/u̯o/
M: [s͇ z͇~ʐ]
F: [s̪~s͇ z̪~z͇]
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