Lihmelinyan

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All4Ɇn
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by All4Ɇn » Sat 09 Dec 2017, 04:07

I'm loving everything I'm seeing so far!
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Sat 09 Dec 2017, 21:05

Thank you guys! I really appreciate it. Just knowing that anyone's even looking at this motivates me to post more.

I'll introduce more verbal forms next. That's what needs the most work :)
Davush wrote:
Wed 06 Dec 2017, 09:43
Wow I can't believe I didn't notice this earlier! I love it! I also began working on a conlang which was intended to be strongly Indo-European with more of a 'classical' feel to it - I think this is more 'truly' IE though!
Yeah my goal was to combine my own a priori vocabulary with as many archaic IE features as I could, even ones that none of the IE daughter languages preserved.
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My conlang: Image Lihmelinyan
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by felipesnark » Thu 21 Dec 2017, 23:30

I've long been fascinated with PIE and the more conservative IE languages, which have influenced my own conlang, Shonkasika. All of this is to say, I love what I'm seeing so far! I look forward to seeing more!
Visit my website for my blogs and information on my conlangs including Shonkasika: http://felipesnark.weebly.com/ It's a work in progress!
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Fri 18 May 2018, 05:54

Kinda sad that I haven't updated this is in so long, but school and life have--alas--gotten in the way. I guess it's time for some new material. [:D] I'm still wavering a bit on the final form of the verbal system, so I'm going to continue with nominals for now (plus I just plain like nouns better than verbs). This is a small update, but it's something.

Feminine Nouns

As I mentioned in previous posts, the feminine gender is a marginal class in Lihmelinyan. The proto-language had only two genders: common and neuter. Lihmelinyan, however, has developed two feminine noun classes with distinct forms separate from masculine and neuter; they both involve long vowels in the stem. They are the ā-stem nouns and the ī-stem nouns. Though they are both athematic in origin, they behave like thematic nouns in that they do not undergo the root ablaut that athematic nouns undergo (when applicable), and the thematic adjective paradigm forms its feminine declension in the ā-stem class. I'll begin with the ā-stems:

ā-stem Feminine Nouns

The most common type of feminine noun is the ā-stem type (there are far more nouns in this class than the ī-stem type). This class easily formed feminine counterparts of masculine thematic nouns. Additionally, as I said above, all thematic adjectives have a feminine declension in -ā. I will discuss adjectives later on, but they are not difficult once you have the nouns down.

To exemplify the ā-stem forms, here is the declension of the word amíntā, "woman":

Image

Notes: The dual nom/voc/acc form is from ā + e, which would normally lead to ā, but this being identical with the singular was replaced by -ē. The dative and locative singular differ only in the length of the diphthong. The allative singular (from ā + a) is necessarily homophonous with the nominative singular. Context makes them easy to tell apart, however.

ī-stem Feminine Nouns

The other major type of feminine noun declension is the ī-stem declension, which might be more appropriately called the ī/yā declension, as the stem ablauts between -ī in the strong cases and -yā in the weak cases.

While the ā-stem declension forms feminine adjectives in the thematic class, the ī-stem declension is used for feminine adjectives of the athematic (consonant, i-stem, u-stem) class. ī-stem nouns are sometimes feminine counterparts of i- or u-stem masculine nouns.

Here is the declension of ī-stem noun gánī "grandmother" (feminine counterpart of masc. "gánus", grandfather):

Image

Notes: The endings aren't too different from the ā-stem forms (just place a <y> in front of the ā of the ā-stem endings to form the weak case endings). Again: the ablaut occurs only in the stem, not in the root or in the ending. Though the ī-stem and ā-stem nouns are a bit different, they share the basic element of a bare long vowel in the nominative, something found only in these two feminine classes.

Adjectives

Lihmelinyan adjectives are very closely related to nouns. Adjectives can be derived from various parts of speech, but they decline like nouns. Adjectives, like nouns, are either thematic or athematic. Thematic adjectives have a masculine form in -as that declines like antīlas, a neuter form in -an that declines like lédian, and a feminine form in that declines like amíntā. The citation form of these adjectives look like this: minas-ā-an, "new".

Athematic adjectives can be formed in any class of athematic nouns: they can be i-stem, u-stem, or consonant stem (which I haven't covered yet, but are similar to the i- and u-stems, just using a consonant in place of a vowel or semivowel). All athematic adjectives, however, have a feminine form that declines in the ī-stem class and this form will be based on the "weak" stem (remember that ī-stem nouns do not undergo root ablaut like other athematic nouns do, if applicable). Athematic adjectives originally did not have a distinct feminine form (in Old Lihmelinyan, the -s ending masculine form was used to modify both masculine and feminine nouns); this is a derived form that borrows the form of the ī-stem declension.

An example of an athematic adjective would be the u-stem adjective neíblus, "tough, hard, rough".

Masculine singular forms: neíblus, neíblu, neíblun, nibleús, nibléwi, nibléwei, etc.
Neuter singular forms: neíblu, neíblu, neíblu, nibleús, nibléwi, nibléwei, etc.
Feminine singular forms: nibléwī, nibléwi, nibléwīn, niblúyās, niblúyai, niblúyāi, etc.

The feminine form is the zero-grade root (nibl-) + the e-grade stem in the strong cases (-eu/w), the zero-grade stem in the weak cases (-u) + the ī-stem endings shown above in the declension of gánī.

Most "derived" adjectives (i.e. adjectives that are formed from noun or verb roots) are thematic; athematic adjectives tend to be "root" adjectives, though there are some exceptions, which you will see when I get into comparison of adjectives and participles. An example of a few adjective-forming suffixes:

-rk* - has the meaning of "characteristic of, similar to, like, typical of" (e.g. ándalas, "boy" --> andalárkas, "boyish, childish")
-n/ny - general adjective-forming suffix (e.g. tánas, "hair" --> tanányas, "hairy"; yéntes, "four" + maks, "foot" - yentimáhnas, "four-footed")
-ll - can mean "possessing, having", but can also mean "full of" (urnás, "red" + "tánas", "hair" --> urntanállas, "red-haired"; kúmā, "hill" --> kumállas, "hilly")

*-rk can be added to other adjectives to mean "somewhat", e.g. úrnas, "red" --> urnárkas, "reddish, somewhat red"
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Tue 29 May 2018, 06:32

More Ablaut

I wanted to say a few additional things about ablaut. Here are some general ablaut patterns you might see in Lihmelinyan:

a -> e, ∅
e -> ∅
ē -> e
ā -> a
au -> u
eu -> u
we -> u
ye -> i
ai -> i
ei -> i
el, al, le, la -> l, ḷ
er, ar, re, ra -> r, ṛ

You can see this most obviously in nouns between the strong (nom/acc/voc) stem and the weak (gen, etc.) stem:

1) *zápnis (nom. sing) zápneyes (nom. plur) zépneis (gen. sing.) - plow
2) maúdis (nom. sing) maúdeyes (nom. plur) mudeís (gen. sing) - crow, raven
3) glátār (nom sing) glátares (nom. plur) gḷtrés (gen. sing) - shield
4) gaúkēr (nom sing) gukrés (gen. plur) - stuff, material

*Why the different accent pattern with this one? A disyllabic noun with an accented á will change the á to é and the accent will remain the same in both the strong and weak cases IF no zero-grade form can occur. There can be no form *zpneís since /zpn/ is not a valid Lihmelinyan cluster. (Compare káru which becomes kreús in the genitive rather than *kéreus).

Essentially, in athematic nouns, zero-grade ablaut always occurs when it can, in as many syllables as it can. A zero-grade syllable can NEVER be accented, hence mudeís in 2) rather than *múdeis.

So for the Lihmelinyan word anyétēr ("dancer"), what would the genitive singular be?
Spoiler:
anitrés
For the neuter noun wétan ("head"), what would the genitive singular be?
Spoiler:
utnés


Thought maybe I should also introduce some function words:

Conjunctions and Particles

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are fairly straight forward. A number of them have cliticized forms that may have slightly different connotations than the "full" form. The "full" form may also be used for greater emphasis:

Words for 'and':

ak - basic word for "and". Joins clauses, phrases, and less commonly, individual words.
-ke - clitic form for "and". Same meaning as above, though primarily used for words and phrases.
ken - postpositive form, sentence-connecting particle. Translated as "And..." at the beginning of a sentence
mía - emphatic word for "and". Has connotations of "and also" or "and then".
ak...ak - both...and

Words for 'or':

uk - basic word for "or". Neither exclusive nor inclusive.
-me - clitic form for "or". Often has inclusive meaning.
ánlan...uk - whether...or
uk...uk - either...or

Words for 'but':

an - basic word for "but". Often at the beginning of a sentence and used in questions.
kína - postpositive, translated as "but" or "however".

Others:

- if
zan - thus, so, consequently
zánke - and so, and as a result
néwe - therefore, and therefore (post positive)

I'll add more to this list as I come up with them.

Particles

Negation:

te - basic negation particle
ta - variation of the negation particle used with subjunctive and optative verbs
t- - clitic form of te. Often prefixed to verbs.
ténu - emphatic form ("definitely not")

Other particles:

le - emphatic particle, can be translated as "definitely, certainly". Emphasizes specific words. Smaígas le áti, kína pálami. "He is certainly ugly, but I love (him)."
un - emphatic particle, same meaning as above, though often sentence final. Emphasizes the entire sentence. Ušáwen te deíperans un. "We (both) did not see the thieves (I swear it)". This sentence could've also been written: deíperans ténu ušáwen.
ra...ra - sentence connective particle, indicates two simultaneous actions. (This...while that) or (On one hand...on the other hand). Hékā ra éhstem, ra ésat. "I walked, [while] he swam".



I'll add more to this list as I come up with them.
Last edited by KaiTheHomoSapien on Wed 06 Jun 2018, 23:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by All4Ɇn » Mon 04 Jun 2018, 03:33

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
Fri 18 May 2018, 05:54
-rk* - has the meaning of "characteristic of, similar to, like, typical of" (e.g. ándalas, "boy" --> andalárkas, "boyish, childish")
*-rk can be added to other adjectives to mean "somewhat", e.g. úrnas, "red" --> urnárkas, "reddish, somewhat red"
Can these two meanings be combined together in the same word, so if I wanted to say something like "somewhat childish" I could say something akin to andalarkárkas?
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Mon 04 Jun 2018, 04:06

I didn't think of that, but I like that idea [:)] It might be a little on the informal side, but it could be attested in everyday speech.
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Wed 17 Oct 2018, 01:42

So I want to kind of start over with verbs, because, while the information I provided before about verbs wasn't entirely incorrect, it was incomplete and I had rushed through it a bit mainly because I've found the verbal system so complicated and confusing. I don't like being confused by my own conlang, but I'm attempting to regularize it a bit and make things easier to understand. I posted the active personal endings of verbs previously and I left that part up. But I'm going to re-do the introduction to thematic and athematic verbs:

Thematic vs. Athematic

Lihmelinyan verbs are either thematic or athematic. Thematic verbs can be identified by containing an /a/ or /e/ before the personal endings (outlined on the previous page).

Athematic verbs attach the personal endings directly to the stem of the verb without an obligatory /a/ or /e/. This stem ends in either a consonant or a long vowel. Verbal stems never end in short vowels.

Verbal Stems and Aspect

Most Lihmelinyan verbs conjugate from three stems, ultimately deriving from their aspect: perfective (past/aorist), imperfective (present), and perfect (stative).

There are a number of different forms the perfective and imperfective stems can take. Most often, the imperfective stem is more marked than the perfective, but not always. I will go over some different forms the stems can take in the next section.

Perfect stems are always formed by reduplication. Not all verbs have all three stems.

Thematic Verbs

I will start out by talking about thematic verbs because they are easier to understand.

Imperfective stems in thematic verbs can take a few different forms. What form they take will determine what form the perfective stem takes (and vice versa). One such type, for example, is the nasal infix. Thus the imperfective stem will contain an /n/ that the perfective stem will lack. Another example is redpulication. The imperfective stem will be redpulicated, so the perfective stem will not be. Sometimes it will simply be a matter of ablaut grade. The imperfective stem will contain an /e/ or less commonly /a/ (and thus be in "full grade") that the perfective stem will not have (and thus be in "zero grade"). All of these are examples where the imperfective/present stem is more marked (i.e. longer) than the perfective/aorist.

So, for example, the verb sándami - "I clean, wash, cleanse". Its imperfective (present) stem is sand- (a nasal infix present). So the perfective stem is simply an a-grade form sad-, without the /n/. This will hopefully illustrate the difference between the present and aorist:

sándesi - you clean

ésades - you cleaned

The present comprises the imperfective stem + "primary" ending. The aorist contains augment + perfective stem + "secondary" ending.

The thematic vowel changes in a predictable pattern: The vowel is /a/ before all 1st person forms and 3rd plural; it is /e/ elsewhere. So the present active thematic endings will look like this:

Code: Select all

	Singular	Dual	Plural
1st	-ami		-awen	-amen
2nd	-esi		-efes	-eten
3rd	-eti		-etes	-anti
And thus here is the present active indicative conjugation of sándami:

Code: Select all

Person   Singular   Dual     Plural
1st      sándami    sándawen sándamen
2nd      sándesi    sándefes sándeten
3rd      sándeti    sándetes sándanti
Note how the accent doesn't change; that's the mark of a thematic. Only the thematic vowel changes between /a/ and /e/.

Although this system is based on PIE, it's not a direct analogue of it. Imperfective/perfective formations are not treated as different verbs the way they essentially are in PIE. The treatment here is more like Greek or Latin. And you won't find many cases of suppletion in Lihmelinyan either.

It isn't easy to talk of "conjugations" in Lihmelinyan either, but a general principle can be stated about how the present (imperfective) and aorist (perfective) stems are formed: Stems are either "root" or "characterized" (to borrow Sihler's term). If a present stem is "root", then the aorist stem is "characterized" (i.e. is reduplicated, contains an -s suffix). Conversely, if an aorist stem is "root", then a present stem is "characterized" (i.e. reduplicated, contains a nasal, is in full-grade compared to a zero-grade, etc.). The latter is the more common situation and essentially the only situation in thematic verbs. I.e. it is more common that the aorist stem is more "basic" than the present stem.

To give a few examples of thematic present and aorist stems:

sándami - "I clean" - present stem sand-, aorist stem sad-
féndami - "I kill" - present stem fend-, aorist stem fed-
térgami - "I stop, cease" - present stem terg-, aorist stem trg-
zéldami - "I stretch" - present stem zeld-, aorist stem zld-
kéinami - "I step" - present stem kein-, aorist stem kin-

Now, perfect stems. The perfect stems are actually quite simple. They are always formed with reduplication. The general rule is that the first consonant is reduplicated with /e/, and the stem is then placed in a-grade. So for the verbs above, here are their 1st singular present perfect forms:

sesándahe - "I have cleaned" (this stem is already in a-grade so it does not change except for reduplication)
fefándahe - "I have killed"
tetárgahe - "I have stopped"
zezáldahe - "I have stretched"
kekáinahe - "I have stepped"

You get the idea :) Hope this makes sense! I'm going to hold off on athematic verbs because I'm still working out some of the kinks. I will go over the different tenses and their endings next.
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Re: Lihmelinyan

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » Sun 21 Oct 2018, 21:13

Mediopassive Voice

The above examples have all been active, but Lihmelinyan has one other verbal voice, the mediopassive. The mediopassive is so-called because it is a combination of a true middle voice and a passive voice. Which meaning is intended depends on context and the semantics of the verb. A passive construction will often have an agent in the instrumental case, a middle construction will often be reflexive, but these are not always the case.

The mediopassive has its own set of personal endings which are separate from the active endings (although in some cases seem to be derived from them). As usual, in thematic verbs the endings follow an /a/ or /e/, but in athematics they attach directly to the stem.

Here are the mediopassive endings:

Primary Endings

Code: Select all

Person    Singular    Dual    Plural
1st       -her        -waz    -maz
2nd	  -fer        -htā    -zwe
3rd       -tar        -htē    -rar
The ending -waza is underlying -was-da (-maza is ultimately -mas-da), but Lihmelinyan turns /sd/ into /z/.

Secondary Endings

Code: Select all

Person    Singular    Dual    Plural
1st       -he          -wet   -met
2nd	  -fe         -tā     -zwe
3rd       -ta         -tē     -ra
The secondary endings are thus missing the element -r (or a laryngeal in the dual 2nd and 3rd), and as is the case in the active voice, the second plural ending is the same across primary and secondary endings.

The mediopassive conjugations in the same tenses as the active.

So, using our example verb sandami, the present mediopassive forms would be:

sándaher
sándefer
sándetar
sándawaz**
sándahtā*
sándahtē*
sándamaz**
sándezwe
sándarar

Sándaher mékkas istérei.

mékkas (adverb) - always
istéras - (thematic masc. noun) - morning

"I always wash in the morning" (middle)

**the endings -waz and -maz are from PIE -wosdh and -mosdh. The change is -wos-dh --> was-da --> waza --> waz. The final /a/ is present in Old Lihmelinyan, but drops out in modern Lihmelinyan due to the restriction on the accent not appear further back than the antepenultimate. A similar change affects the 1st dual and plural of the aorist.

The aorist would be:

esádahe
esádefe
esádeta
esádawet
esádetā
esádetē
esádamet
esádezwe
esádara

Pūkkilās zédeter esádara.

"The floors were washed yesterday" (passive)

pūkkilā (feminine noun) - floor, surface
zédeter (adverb) - yesterday

*Normally, the dual 2nd and 3rd person endings are preceded by /e/, but the presence of the laryngeal causes the thematic vowel to change to /a/. It was /e/ in Old Lihmelinyan and still is in some dialects. This change is complete in standard Lihmelinyan, however, despite the uncommon nature of these forms (let's face it, dual mediopassive is probably the least used of all Lihemlinyan verbal forms!)

Note that all mediopassive endings contain a vowel that is either /a/ or /e/. This is different from the active endings, where some of the endings contain /i/ or consist only of a consonant.
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