Daa Sevǔihk

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Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 06:10

Daa Sevǔihk is a language spoken in an Archipelago between Fuhe and M̟oḩa, called the Sevǔihk Archipelago, ruled by The King of Kings of the United Kingdoms of the Islands of Sevǔihk. It's IRL inspirations are from Tamil and Tsez.



Phonology:
/p~ʋ ʰp p: ɓ~b t~ɹ ʰt t: ɗ~d tɬ~l ʰtɬ t:ɬ ɗɮ c~j ʰc c: ʄ~ɟ k~h ʰk k: ɠ~g kʷ~w ɠʷ/ <p~v hp pp b t~r ht tt d tl~l htl ttl dl c~y hc cc j k~h hk kk g q~w gq>
/s/ <s>
/m ʰm m: n ʰn n: ɲ ʰɲ ɲ: ŋ ʰŋ ŋ: ŋʷ/ <m hm mm n hn nn ñ hñ ñ ñ ń hń ńń ńw>

/i u ɯ/ <i u ǔ>
/ə/ <e>
/a/ <a>
/ai au aɯ əi əu əɯ ɯi ui iu iɯ/ <ai au aǔ ei eu eǔ ǔi ui iu iǔ>
All plain vowels can be geminated, which is indicated in the romanazation by writing the vowel-letter twice.

Plain unvoiced stops become approximants intervocally, plus kʷ become w syllable-finally. Implosives become regular voiced stops syllable-finally; however affricates and voiced labiovelars do not occur syllable finally. preasperated consonants may be realized as /ħC/ or /xC/ depending on dialect. Geminated stops only occur intervocally.

Phonotactics (C)V(C)



Nouns:
Nouns have three genders, Masculine, Feminine, and Neuter (Usually by natural gender, though cultural perception may change that so <Hpai> "sword" is Masc. while <Mulas> "comb" is feminine) two numbers, singular and plural, Five core cases, Absolutive, Ergative, Dative, Genitive and Instrumental, four Locative cases, Locative, Lative, Ablative and Perlative, and six sub-locative cases in-, super-, sub- ad-, apud- and poss-.
Plural is marked by the suffix tla between the root and case affix
The core cases change for gender.
Core Masculine cases:
<Hpai> "sword":
Absolutive: Hpai
Ergative: Hpaig
Dative: Hpaihm
Genitive: Hpain
Instrumental: Hpais

Core Feminine cases:
<Baattemilihk> "Princess"
Absolutive: Baattemiliihk
Ergative: Baattemiliihkaw
Dative: Baattemiliihkuvu
Genitive: Baattemiliihkañ
Instrumental: Baattemiliihket

Core Neuter Cases:
<Semaare> "wool"
Absolutive: Semaare
Ergative: Semaareń
Dative: Semaareva
Genitive: Semaareññe
Instrumental: Semaarere
Last edited by Shemtov on Tue 21 Nov 2017, 03:26, edited 4 times in total.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 08:30

A note on the name:
Sevǔihk was the title taken by the first King of Kings, the unifier of the Sevǔihk Archipelago, and the name means something like "Noble one" or "Honorable one". As a Masculine name, Sevǔihk is a masculine noun, even though it refers to a place, which are normally neuter. Daa is word meaning language and Daa Sevǔihk is an unusual construction. Normally, the place name comes first, in the Genitive, followed by Daa, as in Puheiññe Daa "Fuheko" or Buireññe Daa "Börëʿ". However, Daa Sevǔihk is an honorific construction, though one that only pops up in regard to Sevǔihk and its institutions and culture (there are also special honorific Locative cases, for certain politically or religiously important places, but I will post info on that when I post about the Locative cases).
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Iyionaku » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 09:23

I just came here to look if Shemtov, the master of nasal consonants, has again issued a language with 10+ nasal consonants and I have not been disappointed.
Heaven and Earth, but I feel the color of the cake when you keep the Victoria.
I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


Oh, and there is a [ɕ] in my name!
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 18:04

Iyionaku wrote:
Fri 17 Nov 2017, 09:23
I just came here to look if Shemtov, the master of nasal consonants, has again issued a language with 10+ nasal consonants and I have not been disappointed.
I actually haven't created a language with 10+ nasals in a while. Proto-M̟oḩaic, Southeast Lumubuhudåg and Karèwaho, all have six, which is the same number as in Tamil. Proto- Ruby-and-Sapphire has seven, which is above average, but still under 10. T̟alīf and Proto-ɣø have only 2. The Prophetess' Tongue has 3. I guess the reason most of my Conlangs have above-average nasals is because I tend to treat the nasals like the stop system. Also, an alternative analysis of Daa Sevǔihk has only nine, as the geminate nasals could be seen as a Homoorganic nasal sequence, plus some dialects realize /ŋʷ/ as /w̃/ or /w/ followed by a nasal vowel.
Last edited by Shemtov on Fri 17 Nov 2017, 21:20, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 21:15

The locative cases are the same for all genders. They come in two types, the plain and the honorific. The honorific cases are used for Palaces, Shrines, Hnaula (a Hnau is a place declared clean of evil spirits by priests, that many believe have healing properties) and Monasteries. However, a King may refer to his capital or even his whole kingdom using the honorific locatives, and Kings with rivalries may refer to their rival's palace with non-honorific, as do people who don't believe that a Shrine, Hnau or Monasteries really holy, given their personal religious beliefs (As Sevǔihk religion is animistic, some people don't believe in certain good spirits or that their priests are really holy). There are also locative sub-cases that come before main locative cases. These do not change for honorifics

Main Locative Cases:
Non-Honorific:
Locative: Kaa
Lative: Pi
Ablative: (a)ttǔ
Perlative: Sii

Honorific:
Locative: muu
Lative: dǔhee
Ablative: taǔ
Perlative: ca


The Locative Sub-Cases are:
in- "Inside a building/cave/boat/cart" hte
super- "Above a Location" maara
sub- "Below a location" dǔre
ad-,"At a non-building location" tlab
apud- "Near a location" hciu
poss-. "Attached to an object vertically" gei

Examples:
Manǔm Sevǔihkhtemuu
"Inside the King of Kings palace"

Kivadǔresii
"Passing through the sea, while under its surface"


Kivamaarasii
"Passing through the sea, on its surface"

Hnaulalabdǔhee
"Going to Hnaula"

Migdalageitta
"Coming off of a tower's vertical surface"

Hnauhciuvi
"Going to be near a Hnau I don't believe in"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Tue 21 Nov 2017, 03:32

Daa Sevǔihk Verbs can be divided into Finite and Non-Finite. This post will consider only finite verbs.
Finite verbs have four conjugations: Transitive Vowel Stem (TVS), Transitive Consonant Stem (TCS), Intransitive Vowel Stem (IVS) and Intransitive Consonant Stem (ICS). It must be noted that most transitive verbs relating to internal processes, emotions, and senses are conjugated as Intransitives, but there are exceptions. So Jana "to know by rote" and Ehasuva "to think about" are IVS, Hpak "to hate" is ICS and Araa "to see" is IVS. Major exceptions are Meiviin "To comprehend a matter" which is TCS, Sǔlǔ "to love romantically" which is TVS (this might come from an older use of Sǔlǔ "To have sex with") and Taam "To taste" which is TCS.
The use of these conjugations is for the past and future suffixs (present is ∅), while the person suffixes only differentiate between the vowel and consonant stems, and then only in the present.

Conjugation of TVS "Beelǔ" "to eat"
Present tense:
1P sing: Beelǔn
1P plr: Beelǔm
2P Sing: Beelǔye
2P PLR: Beelǔre
3P sing Masc: Beelǔhna
3P sing Fem: Beelǔle
3P sing neut: Beelǔt
3P plr Masc: Beelǔraa
3P plr Fem: Beelǔtka
3P plr neut: Beelǔna

Past tense:
1P sing: Beelǔlein
1P plr: Beelǔlaum
2P Sing: Beelǔlaaye
2P PLR: Beelǔliire
3P sing Masc: Beelǔlaahna
3P sing Fem: Beelǔlaale
3P sing neut: Beelǔlat
3P plr Masc: Beelǔlaraa
3P plr Fem: Beelǔlatka
3P plr neut: Beelǔlana

Future:
1P sing: Beelǔyein
1P plr: Beelǔyaum
2P Sing: Beelǔyaaye
2P PLR: Beelǔyiire
3P sing Masc: Beelǔyaahna
3P sing Fem: Beelǔyaale
3P sing neut: Beelǔyat
3P plr Masc: Beelǔyaraa
3P plr Fem: Beelǔyatka
3P plr neut: Beelǔyana


TCS Meiviin "To comprehend a matter"
1P sing: Meiviinein
1P plr: Meiviinaum
2P Sing: Meiviinaaye
2P PLR: Meiviiniire
3P sing Masc: Meiviinaahna
3P sing Fem: Meiviinaale
3P sing neut: Meiviinat
3P plr Masc: Meiviinaraa
3P plr Fem: Meiviinatka
3P plr neut: Meiviinana

Past tense:
1P sing: Meiviintlein
1P plr: Meiviintlaum
2P Sing: Meiviintlaaye
2P PLR: Meiviintliire
3P sing Masc: Meiviintlaahna
3P sing Fem: Meiviintlaale
3P sing neut: Meiviintlat
3P plr Masc: Meiviintlaraa
3P plr Fem: Meiviintlatka
3P plr neut: Meiviintlana

Future:
1P sing: Meiviincein
1P plr: Meiviincaum
2P Sing: Meiviincaaye
2P PLR: Meiviinciire
3P sing Masc: Meiviincaahna
3P sing Fem: Meiviincaale
3P sing neut: Meiviincat
3P plr Masc: Meiviincaraa
3P plr Fem: Meiviincatka
3P plr neut: Meiviincana

IVS "Eva" "to come"
1P sing: Evan
1P plr: Evam
2P Sing: Evaye
2P PLR: Evare
3P sing Masc: Evahna
3P sing Fem: Evale
3P sing neut: Evat
3P plr Masc: Evaraa
3P plr Fem: Evatka
3P plr neut: Evana

Past tense:
1P sing: Evavein
1P plr: Evavaum
2P Sing: Evavaaye
2P PLR: Evaviire
3P sing Masc: Evavaahna
3P sing Fem: Evavaale
3P sing neut: Evavat
3P plr Masc: Evavaraa
3P plr Fem: Evavatka
3P plr neut: Evavana

Future:
1P sing: Evasein
1P plr: Evasaum
2P Sing: Evasaaye
2P PLR: Evasiire
3P sing Masc: Evasaahna
3P sing Fem: Evasaale
3P sing neut: Evasat
3P plr Masc: Evasaraa
3P plr Fem: Evasatka
3P plr neut: Evasana


ICS:
Hpak "to hate"
1P sing: Hpakein
1P plr: Hpakaum
2P Sing:Hpakaaye
2P PLR: Hpakiire
3P sing Masc: Hpakaahna
3P sing Fem: Hpakaale
3P sing neut: Hpakat
3P plr Masc: Hpakaraa
3P plr Fem: Hpakatka
3P plr neut: Hpakana

Past tense:
1P sing: Hpakpein
1P plr: Hpakpaum
2P Sing: Hpakpaaye
2P PLR: Hpakpiire
3P sing Masc: Hpakpaahna
3P sing Fem: Hpakpaale
3P sing neut: Hpakpat
3P plr Masc: Hpakparaa
3P plr Fem: Hpakpatka
3P plr neut: Hpakpana

Future:
1P sing: Hpaksein
1P plr:Hpaksaum
2P Sing: Hpaksaaye
2P PLR: Hpaksiire
3P sing Masc: Hpakaahna
3P sing Fem: Hpaksaale
3P sing neut: Hpaksat
3P plr Masc: Hpaksaraa
3P plr Fem: Hpaksatka
3P plr neut: Hpaksana
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Wed 22 Nov 2017, 05:59

Example sentences:
Baattemiliihk hpais pevaaktlein
Baattemiliihk-∅ hpai-s pevaak-tl-ein
Princess-ABS sword-INSTR kill-PST-1P.SING
"I killed the princess with a sword"

Hnauhciusii migdalamaaravi evaasahna
Hnau-hciu-sii migdala-maara-vi evaa-s-ahna
Hnau-APUD-PER.NONHON tower-SUPER-LAT.NONHON come-FUT-3P.MASC
"He will come to the top of the tower via the area around the Hnau I don't believe in"

Htittaññe baasarǔstlag samiile bahmaahtemuu beelǔraa
Htitta-ññe baasarǔs-tla-g samiile-∅ bahmaah-te-muu beelǔ-raa
mountain-GEN priest-PLR-ERG fish-ABS temple-IN-LOC eat-3P.PLR.MASC
"Mountain priests eat fish in the temple"

Ñajayaag migdaladǔrehaa semaare hpakaahna
Ñajayaa-g migdala-dǔre-haa semaare-∅ hpak-aahna
cat-ERG tower-SUB-LOC wool-ABS hate-3P.SING.NEUT
"The cat under the tower hates wool"
Last edited by Shemtov on Fri 24 Nov 2017, 21:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Thu 23 Nov 2017, 08:16

Let's analyze the above sentences syntactically:
The normal word order of transitive sentences in Daa Sevǔihk is Ergative, Absolutive, Dative, Instrumental, The Locative cases, and the verb, with genitives proceeding the noun they posses. Intransitive sentences follow the same order, just without the Ergative, as those with Erg-pro-drop.
The following sentence illustrates this perfectly:
Htittaññe baasarǔstlag samiile bahmaahtemuu beelǔraa
Htitta-ññe baasarǔs-tla-g samiile-∅ bahmaah-te-muu beelǔ-raa
mountain-GEN priest-PLR-ERG fish-ABS temple-IN-LOC eat-3P.PLR.MASC
"Mountain priests eat fish in the temple"
Here we see the Ergative come first, modified by the Genitive, following by the absolutive and then the locative.

See also this sentence:
Baattemiliihk hpais pevaaktlein
Baattemiliihk-∅ hpai-s pevaak-tl-ein
Princess-ABS sword-INSTR kill-PST-1P.SING
"I killed the princess with a sword"

The Ergative is pro-dropped, given that the verb marks the 1P.SING (Note that Daa Sevǔihk is Split-Erg in marking, like IRL Sinaugoro) so the sentence starts with the ABS followed by the INSTR.

However, take the sentence:
Ñajayaag migdaladǔrehaa semaare hpakaahna
Ñajayaa-g migdala-dǔre-haa semaare-∅ hpak-aahna
cat-ERG tower-SUB-LOC wool-ABS hate-3P.SING.NEUT
"The cat under the tower hates wool"

We see a Locative case come before the absolutive. Why? Because the Locative only directly proceeds the verb when the location directly effects the verb. When the locative noun only indicates the place or movement of another noun when the action is taking place, it comes after that noun. So it might be more accurate to translate the above sentence as "The cat which is under the tower hates wool"
Note this change:
Ñajayaag semaare migdaladǔrehaa hpakaahna
Ñajayaa-g semaare-∅ migdala-dǔre-haa hpak-aahna
cat-ERG wool-ABS tower-SUB-LOC hate-3P.SING.NEUT
"When under the tower, the cat hates wool"
In other words, it implies that the cat's hate of wool is only expressed when it is under the tower.
Hower, it is ambiguoius, and may be translated as "The cat hates the wool under the tower", with migdaladǔrehaa being a subordinate clause of semaare. (Note before we leave this sentence behind: "Cat" is assigned Neuter gender because cats do not show strong sexual dimorphism, however, cattle is assigned gender based on whether they are bulls or cows)

Order of multiple Locative Cases is important in this sentence:
Hnauhciusii migdalamaaravi evaasahna
Hnau-hciu-sii migdala-maara-vi evaa-s-ahna
Hnau-APUD-PER.NONHON tower-SUPER-LAT.NONHON come-FUT-3P.MASC
"He will come to the top of the tower via the area around the Hnau I don't believe in"

The verb "evaa" "To come" always takes the lative last. Conversely, the verb Euleihk "To go" takes the Ablative last. Other verbs of motion like <Daras> "To run" usually come in a non-finite form bound to "Evaa" or "Euleihk"
Last edited by Shemtov on Fri 24 Nov 2017, 21:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 24 Nov 2017, 01:06

The Irregular Copula/Exsistential Verb <Ehaiyaa> is conjugated like an intrasitive verb in the present and future tenses, while it is conjugated like a Transitive verb in the past. The final vowel is shortened in the First Persons, and the <e> is deleted for the 3P Neut, resulting in a root Kaiyaa, though the Western dialects use Hkaiyaa instead (note that these dialects render preasperation as a [xC] sequence thus phonemic /ʰkaija:/ is phonetically [xkaija:]) and a small island (about the half the size of Manhattan) in the northwest of the Archipelago called Pattǔgi's dialect uses Saiyaa instead (This is because the Pattǔgi dialect was once part of the Western dialects but [x] >[ s ], so Hpai "sword" is [spai], and in the case of skaiyaa, the stop was deleted.)
Present tense:
1P sing: Ehaiyan
1P plr: Ehaiyam
2P Sing: Ehaiyaaye
2P PLR: Ehaiyaare
3P sing Masc: Ehaiyaahna
3P sing Fem: Ehaiyaale
3P sing neut: Kaiyat
3P plr Masc: Ehaiyaaraa
3P plr Fem: Ehaiyaatka
3P plr neut: Kaiyaana

Past tense:
1P sing: Ehaiyalein
1P plr: Ehaiyalaum
2P Sing: Ehaiyaalaaye
2P PLR: Ehaiyaaliire
3P sing Masc: Ehaiyaalaahna
3P sing Fem: Ehaiyaalaale
3P sing neut: Kaiyaalat
3P plr Masc: Ehaiyaalaraa
3P plr Fem: Ehaiyaalatka
3P plr neut: Kaiyaalana

Future:
1P sing: Ehaiyasein
1P plr: Ehaiyasaum
2P Sing: Ehaiyaasaaye
2P PLR: Ehaiyaasiire
3P sing Masc: Ehaiyaasaahna
3P sing Fem: Ehaiyaasaale
3P sing neut: Kaiyasat
3P plr Masc: Ehaiyaasaraa
3P plr Fem: Ehaiyaasatka
3P plr neut: Kaiyaasana



Examples:
Ñajayaa kaiyat
"It's a cat"

Milihk ehaiyalein
"I was a king"
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 24 Nov 2017, 22:04

Non-Finite Verbs part 1:
Non-Finite Verbs in Daa Sevǔihk are verbs that do not mark for person and tense, but mark for aspect and mood, and are attached to another verb. Daa Sevǔihk has five Non-Finite forms: Perfective Participles, Imperfective Participles, Conditional Participal, Infinitive and Verbal Noun. This post will focus on the first two, as the syntax on the last three is complicated.

Imperfective Participles:
Marked by -dlǔǔ
Are used:
1. When two verbs are being done similtaniously by the same Subject (the converbial usage)
2. To mark continious aspect when used with ehaiyaa
3. With motion verbs with a lative noun and the verb evaa
4. With motion verbs with an ablative noun and the verb euleihk


Let's look at these uses:
1
Baattemiliihk hpais kahaadlǔǔ pevaaktlein
Baattemiliihk-∅ hpai-s kahaa-dlǔǔ pevaak-tl-ein
Princess-ABS sword-INSTR laugh-IMPERF.PART kill-PST-1P.SING
"I killed the princess with a sword, while laughing"

2.
Htittaññe baasarǔstlag samiile bahmaahtemuu beelǔdlǔǔ ehaiyaaraa
Htitta-ññe baasarǔs-tla-g samiile-∅ bahmaah-te-muu beelǔ-dlǔǔ ehaiyaa-raa
mountain-GEN priest-PLR-ERG fish-ABS temple-IN-LOC eat-IMPERF.PART be-3P.PLR.MASC
"Mountain priests are eating fish in the temple"

3.
Hnaulabdǔhee darasdlǔǔ evavein
Hnau-lab-dǔhee daras-dlǔǔ eva-v-ein
Hnau-AD-LAT run-IMPERF.PART come-PST-1P
"I ran to the hnau."

4.
Hnaulabattǔ darasdlǔǔ euleihkpein
Hnau-lab-attǔ daras-dlǔǔ euleihk-p-ein
hnau-AD-ABL.NONHON run-IMPERF.PART go-PST-1P
"I ran from the hnau I don't believe in."

Perfective participles:
Marked by -(e)mmiu
1. When two verbs had been done similtaniously by the same Subject (the converbial usage)
2. To mark perfective aspect when used with ehaiyaa
3. With motion verbs with a lative noun and the verb evaa
4. With motion verbs with an ablative noun and the verb euleihk

Let's look at these uses:
Baattemiliihk hpais kahaammiu pevaaktlein
Baattemiliihk-∅ hpai-s kahaa-mmiu pevaak-tl-ein
Princess-ABS sword-INSTR laugh-PERF.PART kill-PST-1P.SING
"I had killed the princess with a sword, while laughing"

2.
Htittaññe baasarǔstlag samiile bahmaahtemuu beelǔmmiu ehaiyaalaraa
Htitta-ññe baasarǔs-tla-g samiile-∅ bahmaah-te-muu beelǔ-mmiu ehaiyaa-laraa
mountain-GEN priest-PLR-ERG fish-ABS temple-IN-LOC eat-PERF.PART be--PST-3P.PLR.MASC
"Mountain priests are eating fish in the temple"

3.
Hnaulabdǔhee darasemmiu evavein
Hnau-lab-dǔhee daras-emmiu eva-v-ein
Hnau-AD-LAT run-PERF.PART come-PST-1P
"I had run to the hnau."

4.
Hnaulabattǔ darasemmiu euleihkpein
Hnau-lab-attǔ daras-emmiu euleihk-p-ein
hnau-AD-ABL.NONHON run-PERF.PART go-PST-1P
"I had run from the hnau I don't believe in."
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Sun 26 Nov 2017, 09:13

Non-Finite Verbs part 2:
This post will be dedicated to the most complex type of participle, syntactically speaking, the Conditional Participle.
Marked by -qi
Is used:
1. As a protasis for conditional statements, when not directly bound to another verb, and the subject of both the protasis and the apodeisis are the same.
2. As a protasis when the subject of the apodeisis is different when used with ehaiyaa
3. At the time of the action of the following clause, when bound to ehaiyaa, and the following clause is in the perfective aspect (Perfective participle with ehaiyaa)

Let's look at these uses:
1.
Hcainna beelǔwi, aviis meiviincein
Hcainna-∅ beelǔ-wi, aviis-∅ meiviin-c-ein
cannabis-ABS eat-CON.PART. everything-ABS understand-FUT-1P
"If I would eat cannabis, I would understand everything"

2.
Baattemiliihk hpais pevaakqi ehaiyalein, mannuila evavaraa
Baattemiliihk-∅ hpai-s pevaak-qi ehaiya-l-ein mannui-la eva-va-raa
Princess-ABS sword-INSTR kill-CON.PART be-PST-1P soldier-PLR come-PST-3P.PLR
"If I had killed the princess with a sword, the soldiers would have come"

3.
Hnaulabtaǔ euleihkqi ehaiyalein, baattemilihk kaakkaammiu ehaiyaalaale
Hnau-lab-taǔ euleihk-qi ehaiya-l-ein, baattemilihk-∅ kaakkaa-mmiu ehaiyaa-l-aale
Hnau-AD-ABL go-CON.PART be-PST-1P princess-ABS scream-PERF.PART be-PST-3P.FEM
"When I left the Hnau, the princess was screaming"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Mon 27 Nov 2017, 18:21

Non-Finite Verbs part 3:
The Infinitive: Marked by -gǔihñ
This is used:
1. When the Subject of both verbs are the same, and the finite verb is the cause or reason of or has some direct on the infinitive.
2. When the Subject of both verbs are different, and the finite verb is the cause or reason of or has some direct on the infinitive, which is bound to ehaiyaa

Examples:
Samiile beelǔgǔin maskartlein
Samiile-∅ beelǔ-gǔin maskar-tl-ein
fish-ABS eat-INF try--PST1P
"I tried to eat fish"

Hcainaa beelǔgǔin ehaiyan, ñi pevaakgǔin maskartlahna
Hcainaa-∅ beelǔ-gǔin ehaiy-an, ñi pevaak-gǔin maskar-tl-ahna
cannabis-ABS eat-INF be-1P 1P.ABS kill-INF try-PST-3P.MASC.SING
"I am eating cannabis, because he tried to kill me"

The Verbal Noun: marked by -(e)ppam
This is used to nominalize a verb. If the verb in it's finite form takes a direct object, the object is put in front of the verb as a genitive. It is also used with the Ablative case to mean "after", the Lative case for "before", and the Locative as a more polite version of the Conditional Participle. Note that Verbal nouns are unsual in that in those uses it does not take the secondary locative cases.

Samiileññe beelǔppam hmaalǔñ kaiyat
Samiile-ññe beelǔ-ppam hmaalǔñ kaiya-t
fish-GEN eat-NOM healthy be-3P.NEUT
"Eating fish is healthy"

Beelǔppamattǔ sihauvein
Beelǔ-ppam-attǔ sihau-v-ein
eat-NOM-ABL sleep-PST-1P
"After eating, I slept"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Fri 01 Dec 2017, 21:50

Numbers 1-10:
1. Euru
2. Iran
3. Mundǔ
4. Naahń
5. Caidu
6. Caarǔ
7. Tlu
8. Eittǔ
9. Teule
10. Evattǔ
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Re: Daa Sevǔihk

Post by Shemtov » Wed 06 Dec 2017, 05:30

Adjectives in Daa Sevǔihk are verb-like. In fact, predicative adjectives are conjugated like Intrasitive Verbs, without a copula:
Barin
Bari-n
tall-1P
"I am tall"

Samiile eiruvuvana
Samiile eiruvu-va-na
fish red-PST-3P.NEUT
"The fish was red"

Attributive adjectives come after the noun they modify and take the special ending -htlaǔ:
Samiile eiruvuhtlaǔ beelǔgǔin maskartlein
Samiile-∅ eiruvu-htlaǔ beelǔ-gǔin maskar-tl-ein
fish-ABS red-ADJ eat-INF try--PST1P
"I tried to eat red fish"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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