Stoplang scratchpad

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Keenir
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Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Keenir » Sun 03 Dec 2017, 17:19

I made Stoplang with the purpose of taking part in Lexember,

Some of Stoplang's letters are small and raised - these are the parts of the syllabary spelling that have eroded out of pronounciation.

Lexember Day Two:
'akanaka
= numerous. count word. Optional in general situations but may not be dropped.
[ʔa.ka.na.ka]
e.g., A noonganya nhaabaa gaan.
I wiggled my fingers.
A noonganya nyaabaa 'akanaka gaan.
[a no:ŋ.a.ɲa ɲa:b ʔa.ka.na.ka ga:n]
I wiggled my fingers.

A noonganya nyaabaa 'akanaka pas_tho gaan.
[a no:ŋ.a.ɲa ɲa:b ʔa.ka.na.ka pas To ga:n]
I wiggled a finger. (pas_tho means one and alone, but 'akanaka can't be dropped)


Lexember Day Three:
Daasaate
= by, with, owing to, subordinating, thanks to, and also :
[da:.sa:t]
e.g., A thaba seedere daasaate basbasaagare bas 'akanaka!
[a Ta.ba se:d.re da:.sa:t bas.bas.a:g.re bas ʔa.ka.na.ka]
My happiness: puppies!
(my happiness comes from puppies, i have happiness thanks to puppies, etc)


A thaba seedere meese!
[a Ta.ba. se:d.re me:s]
I am happy!
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
Keenir
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Re: Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Keenir » Sun 03 Dec 2017, 19:03

Keenir wrote:
Sun 03 Dec 2017, 17:19
I made Stoplang with the purpose of taking part in Lexember,

Some of Stoplang's letters are small and raised - these are the parts of the syllabary spelling that have eroded out of pronounciation.
Syllabary:
pa ba da ka ga ʔa
sa fa ra la tha ta
ma na nga nya [ma na ŋa ɲa]
a ee oo aa (e)

thaba = I maba = You
taba = I? naba = You? {basically, turning their sentence into a question, at least when the I/you people are the ones being addressed}
gaba = we kaba = our
gaabaa = silence kaabaa = sacred

from page 244 of A Dictionary of Linguistics & Phonetics: Fifth Edition by David Crystal:
inversion (n.) A term used in grammatical analysis to refer to the process or result of syntactic change in which a specific sequence of constituents is seen as the reverse of another. In English, for example, one of the main ways of forming questions is by inverting the order of subject and auxiliary, e.g. Is he going?

A taba beegene gaan da?
I? by.now completed eaten
Have I eaten?
Taba a beken
I have. {lit., I by now}

(is this direct-inverse, or just inverse?)

Sentence-initial A_ is a person marker; in answers to questions, it moves to what the person has done.

The _da {eat} is all that remains of da 'aa [da ʔaa]...I imagine the same erosion that swept away things like the final -e in beegene and the final -aa in nyaabaa [ɲa:b], took the final -aa here and not everyone pronounced [daʔ] instead of [da]

A naba beegene gaan da?
Have you eaten?
Maba a beken.
You have.
Note: the pronoun stays the same, even though the question-asker isn't the one answering.

DIALECT:
A naba beegene gaan da?
Thaba a beken.
&
A taba beegene gaan da?
Maba a beken.



Lexember Day Two:
A noonganya nyaabaa 'akanaka pas_tho gaan.
[a no:ŋ.a.ɲa ɲa:b ʔa.ka.na.ka pas To ga:n]
I wiggled a finger. (pas_tho means one and alone, but 'akanaka can't be dropped)

A thaba seedere meese!
[a Ta.ba. se:d.re me:s]
I am happy!


Note: This part was written without linguistic material nearby:

MEESE & PAS_THO are reducers; initial papers suggested the former was intended for emotional matters, and the latter for physical matters; but in reality, MEESE is to do with anything relating to or involving the mouth; see MESERESE, toothy.
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
Keenir
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Re: Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Keenir » Sun 03 Dec 2017, 20:38

some words from the various lexicon-building threads; most useful.

Gaa, Baa [ga: ba:] croaking, toad calls; which are the source for their names:

Bas Gaa [bas ga:] a large toad.
Bas Baa [bas ba:] a tiny arboreal toad, very loud.


loosa a small cut or tiny wound


Faad So [fa:d so] - to discover, to cut away
{faad is the knife Class}

Fasafee [fa.sa.fe: ] - a person's nose


Bas Laara [bas la:r]
a noun or action
{bas is in the puppy Class}
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
Porphyrogenitos
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Re: Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Porphyrogenitos » Mon 04 Dec 2017, 03:03

Looks nice so far. I like the fairly simple aesthetic of its phonology.

What were the conditions for the dropping of the unpronounced word-internal and word-final vowels? Cause it looks like not all got dropped.

Or if the unpronounced vowels are just orthographic echo vowels, what determines the choice of orthographic silent vowel? Since it seems they differ from word to word.

And what's the significance of the underscore in pas_tho?
Keenir
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Re: Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Keenir » Mon 04 Dec 2017, 03:47

Porphyrogenitos wrote:
Mon 04 Dec 2017, 03:03
Looks nice so far. I like the fairly simple aesthetic of its phonology.
Thank you.
What were the conditions for the dropping of the unpronounced word-internal and word-final vowels? Cause it looks like not all got dropped.
My first thought was that it was just word-final eroding. But when it started happening in the middle of words, I started to wonder if it could happen on syllable breaks -- which would be a mixed blessing, as then I'd have to determine which and when.

But I'm thinking now that the word-middle silences are older, and when the vowel went quiet, a suffix or word was paired with the word to prevent confusion. (my Dec.4 Lexember entry will give a better example of this)
Or if the unpronounced vowels are just orthographic echo vowels, what determines the choice of orthographic silent vowel? Since it seems they differ from word to word.
Originally, I was just going to have the silent vowels have all been <a>s...but then , as I jotted down more and more, a few <e>s snuck in. So maybe the e going silent is more recent, or its less frequent, or... *shrugs* (I wrote this before the above, ergo its greater indecisiveness)
And what's the significance of the underscore in pas_tho?
The underscore is, like the superscripted vowels, more a note from me to myself: telling me that this is something that, though its physically two separate words, neither part can be used separately. (unlike, say, noun Class words)
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Keenir
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Re: Stoplang scratchpad

Post by Keenir » Tue 12 Dec 2017, 04:54

Lexember:

Day 9:
nyathanye...papa = for...it was done; double subordination

[ kepamootha monyapa [ nyathanye gaba paapa [ bas bepaaratee 'ee gemengoo ke ]]]
kepamootha monyapa nyathanye gaba papaa bas bepaaratee 'ee gemengoo ke
[ke.pa.mo:.Ta mo.ɲap ɲa.Ta.ɲe ga.ba pa:.pa bas be.pa:r.tee ʔe: ge.me.ŋo: ke]
yesterday money [ we [ fish is,be mold
Yesterday, for us, moldy fish was bought.

Day 10:
nabagaba = who?

kepamootha nabagaba monyapa bas bepaaratee 'ee
Who bought this fish yesterday?

kepamootha a nabagaba monyapa bas bepaaratee 'ee
Who is the one who bought this fish yesterday?

Day 11:
kee'ee & gee'ee = is, be, will; answer form

[ke:.ʔe: ge:.ʔe:]
A thaba kee'ee
[a Ta.ba ke:.ʔe:]
I is
I did

A thaba gee'ee
[a Ta.ba ge:.ʔe:]
I is
I will

Day 12:
taba...taba & naba...naba = you why?

A taba kee'ee taba
[a ta.ba ke:.ʔe: ta.ba]
Why did you?



ɲ ny
ʔ '
ŋ ng
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