False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

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Iyionaku
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Iyionaku » Fri 24 Aug 2018, 12:32

Zé do Rock wrote:
Mon 13 Aug 2018, 23:09
I was new in Germany, had a job, and a lady told that a guy came with full 'carajo' down the street, and i asked myself what she ment with it, since she seemed to be a quite decent lady, and for me what she was saying was that the guy came with a "full penis" down the street. 'Carajo' is for me a penis, in spanish. But in german it means 'momentum'. The word clearly seems to come from spanish, so i guess somebody misunderstood something...

Greetings from Babilon, in Czechia
Now may I surprise you, the German word "Karacho" actually derives form the Spanish word "carajo", at least according to Wiktionary!
Wiktionary (to English by translate google) wrote:Origin:

in the 20th century by Spanish carajo → it borrowed, in spanish rough curse word for "penis". Emergence unexplained. [1] [2]
By the way, it doesn't mean "momentum" in German, but rather "high velocity with strong momentum"
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by WeepingElf » Fri 24 Aug 2018, 19:59

Has anyone mentioned this one yet?
:gbr: pantomime vs. :deu: Pantomime 'mime'
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Fri 24 Aug 2018, 21:42

Iyionaku wrote:
Fri 24 Aug 2018, 12:32
Zé do Rock wrote:
Mon 13 Aug 2018, 23:09
I was new in Germany, had a job, and a lady told that a guy came with full 'carajo' down the street, and i asked myself what she ment with it, since she seemed to be a quite decent lady, and for me what she was saying was that the guy came with a "full penis" down the street. 'Carajo' is for me a penis, in spanish. But in german it means 'momentum'. The word clearly seems to come from spanish, so i guess somebody misunderstood something...

Greetings from Babilon, in Czechia
Now may I surprise you, the German word "Karacho" actually derives form the Spanish word "carajo", at least according to Wiktionary!
EUROPAN

Oh, reali? Deutshe 'karacho', pronunsee /karaxo/, ven af espaniano 'carajo', pronunsee /karaxo/? Dat is fasinal! E meibi meme deutsh 'sombrero' ven af espanian 'sombrero'?


ENGLISH

Oh, really? German 'karacho', pronounced /karaxo/, comes from spanish 'carajo', pronounced /karaxo/? Thats amazing! And maybe even german 'sombrero' comes from spanish 'sombrero'?


Wiktionary (to English by translate google) wrote:Origin:

in the 20th century by Spanish carajo → it borrowed, in spanish rough curse word for "penis". Emergence unexplained. [1] [2]
By the way, it doesn't mean "momentum" in German, but rather "high velocity with strong momentum"
EUROPAN

Tecniclik yu corect, mi supon. Mas algucom is non ale momentum a "high velocity with strong momentum"? Mi vole sei, "low velocity with strong momentum" vou son a bit strange, no?

Salutus de Manshnow, Deutshland

ENGLISH

Technically you're right, i guess. But isnt every momentum somehow a "high velocity with stron momentum"? I mean, "low velocity with strong momentum" would sound a bit strange, wouldnt it?

Greetings from Manshnow, Deutshland
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by qwed117 » Sun 26 Aug 2018, 02:05

Large objects can have low velocities and high momentums.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by sangi39 » Thu 30 Aug 2018, 18:14

Only as far as I can tell:

Georgian: პასტა (ṗasṭa), meaning "pen" vs. English pasta

Both come from the Italian word pasta, though, but the Georgian borrowing seems to have been influenced in part by the pasta penne, but also by the other, seemingly more common, word for "pen" კალამი (ḳalami), which comes from Greek κάλαμος (kálamos), meaning "reed".

პასტა (ṗasṭa) does also appear to just mean "pasta", as you might expect, but there's also მაკარონი (maḳaroni) for that.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Imralu » Thu 30 Aug 2018, 19:19

:eng: sport
:de: Sport (sport, exercise)
Glossing Abbreviations: COMP = comparative, C = complementiser, ACS / ICS = accessible / inaccessible, GDV = gerundive, SPEC / NSPC = specific / non-specific, AG = agent, E = entity (person, animal, thing)
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Creyeditor » Thu 30 Aug 2018, 20:12

Indonesian daun leaf
English down

Just came to my mind. Spelling is different of course, but pronunciation is pretty close, especially by those Indonesian celebrities with a fake English accent (e.g. unrelated [ɾ]→[ɹ~ɻ]) or with maybe some more Malaysian-like variety.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by k1234567890y » Fri 31 Aug 2018, 15:45

http://hyperdimensionneptunia.wikia.com/wiki/Ziege

I have pointed out that her name means "goat" in Standard German and in Standard German that word can be something derogative to a woman...maybe Egerius, Creyeditor, Iyionaku and Imralu can help confirming this?
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Creyeditor » Fri 31 Aug 2018, 16:06

True. 'alte Ziege' (old goat) is a common derogatory term for a moody woman.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Dormouse559 » Sat 01 Sep 2018, 02:34

:eng: English: serene
:bel: Walloon: serene - churn
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Sat 01 Sep 2018, 08:30

REFORMADO

Esu no tene muitu a ver co cognatos, mas ten a ver co malcomprendidos internacional, talveis algunis no coness...:

Ain buss helt an und zwai italiena staigen ain.
Thay seet themselvs, and hav a loud and annimated conversation.
Una dama ki es sentee atraz lis ignora la conversacion, ma son atencion è despertee cand ela ecut uno dee tipos dizir:
“Emma come first. Den I come. Two asses, they come together. I come again. Two asses, they come together again. I come again and pee twice. Then I come once-a-more.”
"Vos es unos indecentis", di la dama revoltad, "nos non abla de nosa vida sexual en publico, en noso paiz!"
“Keda trankila, mossa,” dis el italo. “Eu so ta splicand a min amigo como se soletra Mississippi.”


ENGLISH

This doesnt have much to do with cognates, but has to do with international missunderstandings, maybe some of you dont know it...

A bus stops and two Italian men get on.
They seat themselves, and have an loud and animated conversation.
The lady sitting behind them ignores their conversation at first, but her attention is drawn when she hears one of the men say the following:
“Emma come first. Den I come. Two asses, they come together. I come again. Two asses, they come together again. I come again and pee twice. Then I come once-a-more.”
“You swearing and cursing rude men,” the lady said in a very haughty fashion. “We don’t talk about our sex lives in public places here!”
“Hey, coola down lady,” says the Italian. “Ima justa tellin my frienda how to spella Mississippi.”
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by GrandPiano » Sun 02 Sep 2018, 01:56

Zé do Rock wrote:
Sat 01 Sep 2018, 08:30
ENGLISH

This doesnt have much to do with cognates, but has to do with international missunderstandings, maybe some of you dont know it...

A bus stops and two Italian men get on.
They seat themselves, and have an loud and animated conversation.
The lady sitting behind them ignores their conversation at first, but her attention is drawn when she hears one of the men say the following:
“Emma come first. Den I come. Two asses, they come together. I come again. Two asses, they come together again. I come again and pee twice. Then I come once-a-more.”
“You swearing and cursing rude men,” the lady said in a very haughty fashion. “We don’t talk about our sex lives in public places here!”
“Hey, coola down lady,” says the Italian. “Ima justa tellin my frienda how to spella Mississippi.”
This is probably better for this thread.
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Sun 02 Sep 2018, 18:23

Iyionaku wrote:
Fri 24 Aug 2018, 12:32
Zé do Rock wrote:
Mon 13 Aug 2018, 23:09
I was new in Germany, had a job, and a lady told that a guy came with full 'carajo' down the street, and i asked myself what she ment with it, since she seemed to be a quite decent lady, and for me what she was saying was that the guy came with a "full penis" down the street. 'Carajo' is for me a penis, in spanish. But in german it means 'momentum'. The word clearly seems to come from spanish, so i guess somebody misunderstood something...

Greetings from Babilon, in Czechia
Now may I surprise you, the German word "Karacho" actually derives form the Spanish word "carajo", at least according to Wiktionary!

Aren't all :deu: words with a /x/ that is not syllable-final, loan words, unless their is a vowel-initial suffix? I would have never guessed :esp: <carajo> though, I would have guessed a West Slavic loan.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Creyeditor » Sun 02 Sep 2018, 20:57

Shemtov wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 18:23
Aren't all :deu: words with a /x/ that is not syllable-final, loan words, unless their is a vowel-initial suffix?
Sound's about right.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Mon 03 Sep 2018, 08:28

GrandPiano wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 01:56
Zé do Rock wrote:
Sat 01 Sep 2018, 08:30
ENGLISH

This doesnt have much to do with cognates, but has to do with international missunderstandings, maybe some of you dont know it...

A bus stops and two Italian men get on.
They seat themselves, and have an loud and animated conversation.
The lady sitting behind them ignores their conversation at first, but her attention is drawn when she hears one of the men say the following:
“Emma come first. Den I come. Two asses, they come together. I come again. Two asses, they come together again. I come again and pee twice. Then I come once-a-more.”
“You swearing and cursing rude men,” the lady said in a very haughty fashion. “We don’t talk about our sex lives in public places here!”
“Hey, coola down lady,” says the Italian. “Ima justa tellin my frienda how to spella Mississippi.”
This is probably better for this thread.
Thanks, will do next time...
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Mon 03 Sep 2018, 17:45

Creyeditor wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 20:57
Shemtov wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 18:23
Aren't all :deu: words with a /x/ that is not syllable-final, loan words, unless their is a vowel-initial suffix?
Sound's about right.
I'm learning Yiddish, and if /x/ is not syllable final, it either comes from the Hebreo-Aramaic layer /xasn/ "bridegroom" from Biblical :isr: /ħaθan, or the Slavic layer, like /xapn/ "to grab" often used in compounds as synonym for /farʃtaijn/ "to understand", from :pol: chapać
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by WeepingElf » Mon 03 Sep 2018, 19:31

Creyeditor wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 20:57
Shemtov wrote:
Sun 02 Sep 2018, 18:23
Aren't all :deu: words with a /x/ that is not syllable-final, loan words, unless their is a vowel-initial suffix?
Sound's about right.
Yes. German /x/ is either from Proto-Germanic */x/, which has become /h/ in syllable onsets, or (via the High German consonant shift) from Proto-Germanic */k/, which wasn't affected by this shift in initial position (some southern dialects, most notoriously Swiss German, have /k/ > /kx/ in initial position, though, with /kx/ moving on to /x/ in some of them). So no /x/ in syllable onsets in native Standard German words.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by GrandPiano » Mon 03 Sep 2018, 20:31

:ryu: Okinawan 誰 taa "who"
:chn: Mandarin 他 tā "he, him"
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Mon 03 Sep 2018, 23:47

Only orthographic, and then only in the Official Romanization:
:eng: Women :zho: 我們 pinyin Wǒmen "we"
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Salmoneus » Tue 04 Sep 2018, 00:20

Someone's probably mentioned this already, but Old English (Geman Kuh, etc), vs Old Irish (and modern Irish for that matter) .

These even come quite close together in Scotland - Scots coo vs Scottish Gaelic ...
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