False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Wed 05 Sep 2018, 08:47

Khemehekis wrote:
Wed 05 Sep 2018, 02:34
The full pronunciations given on Wiktionary are:

IPA (key): /dʊʁç/, /dʊɐ̯ç/ (standard)
IPA (key): /dʊɐ̯x/, /dʊɪ̯ç/ (regionally)

Note that in standard German, even the [ɐ̯] pronunciation takes [ç]! [dʊɐ̯x] is acceptable regionally though (not sure which regions).
REFORMD

I usualy heer /duiç/ in standard, but probbably if sum-one sed /duɐ̯ç/ i wudnt eeven notice it. Co /x/ lu sonerai com un dialecto du sudest, como beirish o austrish. Otras palabras co R aún ten la /ç/, mesmo ki con un /ɐ̯/: lerche, kirche. Ki in Central Deutshland é pronunciado todo co /S/: lersche, kirsche.

ENGLISH

I usually hear /duiç/ in standard, but probably if someone said /duɐ̯ ç/ i wouldnt even notice it. With /x/ it would sound as a dialect from the southeast, as bavarian or austrian. Other words with R still have a /ç/, even when with an /ɐ̯:/: lerche, kirche. Which in Central Germany is pronounced always with /S/: lersche, kirsche.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Khemehekis » Wed 05 Sep 2018, 15:14

"Lerche" is larks and "Kirche" church, right? If someone said "Kirsche" to me, I'd think she or he was talking about cherries (or cherry-flavored drinks).
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Wed 05 Sep 2018, 21:38

Khemehekis wrote:
Wed 05 Sep 2018, 15:14
"Lerche" is larks and "Kirche" church, right? If someone said "Kirsche" to me, I'd think she or he was talking about cherries (or cherry-flavored drinks).
PROGRESAL EUROPAN

Ya, mi suppon ai nepoco pares laike dat... come 'mich' (mi) et 'misch' (melanger)... me pregunto cuantos pares na same gramaticale clas, donde la confusión es mas probable...


ENGLISH

Yeah, i guess there are quite a few pairs like that... as 'mich' (me) and 'misch' (mix)... i wonder how many pairs in the same grammatical class, where confusion is more likely...
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Fri 07 Sep 2018, 21:05

:deu: Mitter "Midnight" Yiddish /mitr/ "Mothers" (unrounding of HG umlauts) In the SE dialect it's also the singular- /u/>/i/
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Sun 09 Sep 2018, 22:39

REFORMIRT

Interessant find ich, das in kaina doitshen statt mit mer als aina halben milion ainwonan man 'ich' sagte. In Berlin, Hamburg, Hannover, Bremen one wud say 'ik' in the dialect, in Dresden, Leepzsch (Leipzig), Frankford, Kölle one wud say 'isch', in Sturgard and Minga 'i'. Inton porkee diablo lis prendou 'ich', si tanti deutshe dialectos ha problemas co lu?


ENGLISH

I find it interesting that in no german city with more than half a million people people say 'ich' in their dialects. In Berlin, Hamburg, Hannover, Bremen one would say 'ik' in the dialect, in Dresden, Leepzsch (Leipzig), Frankford, Kölle one would say 'isch', in Sturgard and Minga 'i'. So why the hell they say 'ich', if so many german dialects have problems with it?
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by eldin raigmore » Mon 10 Sep 2018, 01:26

Zé do Rock wrote:
Sun 09 Sep 2018, 22:39
ENGLISH

I find it interesting that in no german city with more than half a million people people say 'ich' in their dialects. In Berlin, Hamburg, Hannover, Bremen one would say 'ik' in the dialect, in Dresden, Leepzsch (Leipzig), Frankford, Kölle one would say 'isch', in Sturgard and Minga 'i'. So why the hell they say 'ich', if so many german dialects have problems with it?
Could it be just to fuck with us?

Probably not, I guess ...
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Mon 10 Sep 2018, 20:06

eldin raigmore wrote:
Mon 10 Sep 2018, 01:26
Zé do Rock wrote:
Sun 09 Sep 2018, 22:39
ENGLISH

I find it interesting that in no german city with more than half a million people people say 'ich' in their dialects. In Berlin, Hamburg, Hannover, Bremen one would say 'ik' in the dialect, in Dresden, Leepzsch (Leipzig), Frankford, Kölle one would say 'isch', in Sturgard and Minga 'i'. So why the hell they say 'ich', if so many german dialects have problems with it?
Could it be just to fuck with us?

Probably not, I guess ...
PROGRESAL EUROPAN

He he, probabli no... ma la gramaticalse complicacionen in deutshe shon... it was too long a lingua ki nobody spoke exept scolaris, e they loved complicaciones, since la plus harde la lingua is, la beta the elites can show ki they're someding beta ki the rifraf.

Au momento mi vas co mai velo de la polski-almande fronter a la danish-almand fronter, mi pasa par Vorpommern. Na periodico mi ha le un artucul in plattdeutsh e comprendí ki oeste plattdeutsh 'ju' (objecto form af the 2. pers. plural) tien a ver co hai aleman 'euch', porkee akie oni dice 'juch'. Akie no é ich-du-er-sie-es-wir-ihr-sie, e no é como na platt de Hamborg, ik-du-he-se-dat-wi-ji-se, akie é ik-du-hei-sei-et-wi-ji-sei. E 'bauch' wird zu 'buk', 'buch' wird zu 'bauk'... (in Hamburg platt 'bauch' is 'buk', 'buch' is 'book'). De toute fasson la platt ha no declinaciones, mas malheureusement il ist no el oficiale lingua in Allemagne, il ist mem en train de disaparetre. Pommern-platt is super rar akie, el único lugar donde todavia oni lo abla is in Brazil, mas allá lu is mezclado co portugalian...


ENGLISH

Heh heh, probably not... but i do think that they wanted to do it with the grammatical complications... it was too long a language that nobody spoke except scholars, and they loved complications, since the harder the language is, the better the elites can show that they're something better than the riffraff.

At the moment i cycle from the german-polish border to the german-danish border, i'm crossing Pomerania. In the paper i read an article in plattdeutsch and understood that western plattdeutsh 'ju' (object form of the 2. person plural) has to do with high german 'euch', because here it is 'juch'. Here they dont say ich-du-er-sie-es-wir-ihr-sie, and they dont say as in the platt of Hamburg, ik-du-he-se-dat-wi-ji-se, they say ik-du-hei-sei-et-wi-ji-sei. And 'bauch' (belly) becomes 'buk', 'buch' (book) becomes 'bauk'... (in Hamburg platt 'bauch' is 'buk', 'buch' is 'book'). Anyway plattdeutsh doesnt have cases, but unfortunately it's not the official language in Germany, it is even disappearing. Pomeranian platt is quite rare to hear here, the only place where they still speak it is in Brazil, but there it is mixed with portuguese...
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by yangfiretiger121 » Sat 15 Sep 2018, 15:33

Sglod wrote:
Sun 10 Jan 2016, 17:23
:jpn: 顔 kao face :eng: cow
Like most, if not all, Japanee/English pairings in this topic, this is based on an (incorrect) English diphthongization of Japanese vowels. 顔 Kao should be pronounced [kä.o̞].
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » Sat 15 Sep 2018, 15:52

yangfiretiger121 wrote:
Sat 15 Sep 2018, 15:33
Sglod wrote:
Sun 10 Jan 2016, 17:23
:jpn: 顔 kao face :eng: cow
Like most, if not all, Japanee/English pairings in this topic, this is based on an (incorrect) English diphthongization of Japanese vowels. 顔 Kao should be pronounced [kä.o̞].
But like most, if not all, Japanese/English pairings in this topic, this doesn't claim that the Japanese word is pronounced with a diphthong. At least not outright. I can't speak for Sglod's original intentions.

For a pair/set of words to qualify for this thread, they don't have to be pronounced identically. Yes, kao isn't pronounced with a diphthong, but even so, it's not like [ka.o] is worlds away from [kʰaʊ̯].
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Wed 19 Sep 2018, 17:48

REFORMAD

Cuando yo taba viajand a ded en autopistas nederlandish, fa mucho temp, a veses yo keriba disir "Por favor para na próxima salidum", y yo no sabiba com é la palabra pra 'salidum'. Nederlandish é frecuentement alg entre inglish i deutsh, mas nese caso la dos linguas tene palabras totalmente diferent, 'exit' i 'ausfahrt'. Ich dachte das in disem fall das wort im nederlandish ea wi das deutshe wort sain müsste, natürlich aba nederlandishisirt. 'Aus' becums 'uit', F is renderd V in nederlandish, at leest in germanic werds, and the long A is with AA, thus 'uitvaart'. Inton je disè toto temp 'Alsjeblieft, stop aan de volgende uitvaart' (por favor, stope na procimo salidum). Normalmente lis comprendou lo ki yo kereba disir, porkee muchos nederlandis fala tamben deutsh, mas un nederlando esplicou mi ki 'uitvaart' kere disir 'funeral'.

I, claro - wenn das hir noch nich erweent wurde: deutshe 'Gute fahrt' dusnt meen 'good fart!", it meens 'good trip!'


ENGLISH

When i was hitchhiking on dutch motorways, a long time ago, sometimes i wanted to say "Please dropp me off at the next exit", and i didnt know the word for 'exit'. Dutch is often something between english and german, but in this case both languages have totally different words, 'exit' and 'ausfahrt'. I thought that in this case it is more likely that dutch has the german word, of course adapted to dutch. 'Aus' becomes 'uit', F is rendered V in dutch, at least in germanic words, and the long A is with AA, thus 'uitvaart'. So i kept saying 'Alsjeblieft, stop aan de volgende uitvaart' (please, let me out at the next uitvaart). They usually understood it because many dutch people speak german, but one driver explained to me that 'uitvaart' means 'funeral'.

And of course - in case this hasnt been mentioned here: german 'Gute fahrt!' doesnt mean 'good fart!", it means 'good trip!'
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Fri 21 Sep 2018, 03:51

Maybe I wouldn't hear it if they didn't have a lose semantic connection:
Judeo- :eng: /biə/ "Sex; Coitus" :bgd: /bie/ "wedding"
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Wed 03 Oct 2018, 22:09

REFORMIRT

Auf doitsh wissen wir was 'mushi' bedoitet. In japanese, to say "halo" on the fone, thay say "mushi-mushi". Et en Romenia lis ofre "muschi de porc", esu non es un chate de porca: 'muschi' é la palabra pra músculo, y tamben pra bistec.

Saludus de Ter Apel, Nederland


ENGLISH

In german 'muschi' is the pussy. In japanse, to say "helo" on the fone, they say "mushi-mushi". And in Romania they offer "muschi de porc", thats not a pigs pussy: 'muschi' is the word for muscle, and also for steak.

Greetings from Ter Apel, Netherlands
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Shemtov » Wed 03 Oct 2018, 22:22

:eng: "Geisha" "Gay Show". Someone once told me he liked watching "Geishas" and I misheard him and responded "I didn't know you were gay. This seems a weird way to come out."
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » Thu 04 Oct 2018, 01:39

Zé do Rock wrote:
Wed 03 Oct 2018, 22:09
In japanse, to say "helo" on the fone, they say "mushi-mushi".
In Japanese, to say "hello" on the phone, they actually say もしもし moshi moshi. むしむし mushi mushi could be interpreted as "insect insect", among other things.

Although I'm sure you'd still be understood if you answered with むしむし.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by All4Ɇn » Thu 04 Oct 2018, 06:51

shimobaatar wrote:
Thu 04 Oct 2018, 01:39
Although I'm sure you'd still be understood if you answered with むしむし.
Unless you were calling an Entomologist
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » Thu 04 Oct 2018, 12:53

All4Ɇn wrote:
Thu 04 Oct 2018, 06:51
shimobaatar wrote:
Thu 04 Oct 2018, 01:39
Although I'm sure you'd still be understood if you answered with むしむし.
Unless you were calling an Entomologist
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Thu 04 Oct 2018, 22:20

shimobaatar wrote:
Thu 04 Oct 2018, 01:39
Zé do Rock wrote:
Wed 03 Oct 2018, 22:09
In japanse, to say "helo" on the fone, they say "mushi-mushi".
In Japanese, to say "hello" on the phone, they actually say もしもし moshi moshi. むしむし mushi mushi could be interpreted as "insect insect", among other things.

Although I'm sure you'd still be understood if you answered with むしむし.
PROGRESAL EUROPAN

Oh pardon. Some german told mi dat it was mushi-mushi, e wen mi was in Japan, dat was wat mi herd na fone, mi supone cose mi was expecting it, so mai cerebro tolco "corected" wat main ores herd. Mi shal corige dat in un otre stori ki mi ha fa. Merci pro sei mi lo.


ENGLISH

Oh sorry. Some german told me that it was mushi-mushi, and when i was in Japan, that was what i heard on the fone, i suppose because i was expecting it, so my brain just "corrected" what my ears had heard. I have to correct it somewhere else. Thanks for telling me.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by shimobaatar » Thu 04 Oct 2018, 23:16

No worries! They do sound pretty similar.
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Zé do Rock » Tue 09 Oct 2018, 20:52

REFORMD

'Pusi' in shqiperiano meens 'wel'. E la palavra pro pussy in suomian is 'häpy'.

Saludus de Waimes, Belgie, onde lis no sa si lis deve falar francian o deutsh.


ENGLISH

'Pusi' in albanian means 'well'. And the word for pussy in finnish is 'häpy'.

Greetings from Waimes, Belgium, where they dont know whether they should speak french or german
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Re: False friends and other unfortunate coincidences

Post by Iyionaku » Thu 18 Oct 2018, 15:02

Two examples of false friends between Standard German and Namibian German:

:nam: jdn. anbellen - to give someone a phone call
:deu: jdn. anbellen - to bark at someone

:nam: aussortieren - to sort something out [regard the English influence here]
:deu: aussortieren - to cull
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