Wacky theory on Basque.

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gestaltist
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by gestaltist » Wed 15 Nov 2017, 17:32

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 17:25
I must be weird then, because I tend to like anomalies; I find them fascinating.
But I realize I'm an anomaly [:P]
At least you like yourself, then!
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by Iyionaku » Thu 16 Nov 2017, 08:05

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 17:25

I must be weird then, because I tend to like anomalies; I find them fascinating. I'm always disappointed when I find out that some "pre-IE" root in Greek or Latin might actually just be an odd outcome of an IE root. (I was even disappointed when the "Koreanic" family came about and no longer was Korean considered an isolate). I like mysteries. But I realize I'm an anomaly [:P]
To be fair, Koreanic is still a language isolate if you count only extant languages. Then, one could argue that the dialect of Jeju is so distinct that you can count is as a language of its own, which would make for a new "Koranic" language family with two members.
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by Shemtov » Fri 17 Nov 2017, 20:16

Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
AlwaysForget
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by AlwaysForget » Sat 18 Nov 2017, 19:05

Shemtov wrote:
Fri 17 Nov 2017, 20:16
See here:
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=5291&p=221014
I'll believe it when I see someone lay out the sound correspondences and not just vaguely similar-sounding words.
:usa: [tick] :de: [:)] :es:/:fr: (Basque) [:S] :jp: [:'(]
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by Shemtov » Sun 19 Nov 2017, 00:19

AlwaysForget wrote:
Sat 18 Nov 2017, 19:05
Shemtov wrote:
Fri 17 Nov 2017, 20:16
See here:
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=5291&p=221014
I'll believe it when I see someone lay out the sound correspondences and not just vaguely similar-sounding words.
My point was that "my" theory is as valid as this thread's OP's, and the response I got for that thread is all I can say about it.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by AlwaysForget » Sun 19 Nov 2017, 00:21

Shemtov wrote:
Sun 19 Nov 2017, 00:19
My point was that "my" theory is as valid as this thread's OP's, and the response I got for that thread is all I can say about it.
Ah, I see. My bad if I came off as hostile or anything
:usa: [tick] :de: [:)] :es:/:fr: (Basque) [:S] :jp: [:'(]
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by Vlürch » Sun 31 Dec 2017, 16:53

ixals wrote:
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 17:09
AlwaysForget wrote:
Wed 15 Nov 2017, 16:59
Ideally I would have had a better corpus to choose from, [...]
I think this is quite the good corpus so that one can see that these two are likely not related. Multiple words in your list are found in the Swadesh list as well which are lemmas that don't get replaced as often as others. The numbers from one to five are completely different, as well as word like "sun", "star" and "water". I don't think either Basque or Etruscan could change that much of its core vocabulary.
In the Swadesh list of Finnish, at least a third of the words are Indo-European loanwords. So, as a Finn, I'll never understand the argument/claim/whatever that Swadesh list words are not easily replaced. And just to be clear, I'm not bringing this up to argue that Etruscan and Basque are related; I know literally nothing about the former other than it possibly being the source language of the English word "person" and only a couple of words and tiny bits of grammar of the latter, and don't even care either way. I'm just saying that many of the words making up the Swadesh list can and have been replaced in at least one language.
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by ThatAnalysisGuy » Thu 01 Mar 2018, 14:31

I do not see a relation to Basque and Etruscan. The Basque language is grouped with Aquitanian and sometimes Iberian in a Vasconic group, and Etruscan is proposed to be part of a Tyrsenian language family along with Lemnian and Rhaetic.
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by eldin raigmore » Wed 11 Apr 2018, 19:21

DV82LECM wrote:
Wed 07 Jun 2017, 17:01
What is there, if any, in the form of research done to suggest that Basque evolved from Etruscan?
Maybe I missed something, but the OP asked to be pointed to any evidence or research into the question; even refuted evidence (together, presumably, with it’s refutation), and even non-“reputable” or non-mainstream research (including currently ongoing research).

Did I read something into their posts that isn’t there?
Or did I miss something in some other responders’ reply?

Such evidence and such research, even if now-refuted, or even if “crackpot” from the get-go, could be interesting and useful for conlanging. One could argue that this is the wrong subforum to post the question on; but I can’t think of a more appropriate one.

I’d like to see such research and such evidence.

I don’t expect it to convince me or anyone else that any of Basque or Dutch or Etruscan descended from one of the others.
Edit: BTW The info about Finnish and the Swadesh list is also interesting.
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Re: Wacky theory on Basque.

Post by k1234567890y » Sat 14 Apr 2018, 02:36

after taking a glimpse of the words listed by AlwaysForget, I'd say, either they are not connected, or a very irregular sound changes would be required, or a crazy degree of semantic shifts or borrowings need to occur, anyways, Basque is probably not from Etruscan, period.

I don't know the genetics about Etruscan people, but if evidence shows that they are genetically related, the best bet is that one of the communities, or both of them, had a language shift in the prehistoric era in which they shifted to a language of a dominant group of the area.
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