European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

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Bryan
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Bryan » Sun 30 Oct 2011, 11:47

The EU needs to take a running jump, fullstop.

/controversial
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Micamo
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Micamo » Sun 30 Oct 2011, 17:53

xingoxa wrote:The EU's total costs for simultaneous interpretation and translation are just a tiny fraction of its costs for - for instance - its agricultural subsidies.
Subsidies far more harmful to society than anything linguistic diversity will ever cause, I might add.
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Rainchild » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 05:59

As many of you already know, the simplified morphology of most proposed auxlangs doesn't really represent optimal language design. A German-speaking gentleman once told me why.

When he first learned to converse in English, he found it easy because English doesn't have three genders, four cases, and other morphological complexities found in German and other languages. However, when he learned to read academic discourse in English, he found our language difficult because of all the strange constructions we use to compensate for the absence of complex morphology. Why? Because complex morphology makes it easier to tell who's doing what to whom in long sentences and formal discourse.

Unfortunately for IAL schemes, complex discourse is precisely what one would need an IAL for. People do their everyday discourse in their own languages, or in the case of travelers, the ambient ones. Even IAL proponents don't propose auxlangs as a universal medium for everyday conversation. It is business, government, and law for which an IAL would be most useful.

Natlangs already have complex morphology, or, in languages like English and Chinese, complex ways of compensating for its absence. So who needs an artificial IAL?

Jim G.
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Micamo
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Micamo » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 07:06

The answer is clear: We must all learn Tlingit!
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Avo
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Avo » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 07:40

Micamo wrote:The answer is clear: We must all learn TlingitInyauk!
Fixed. Now more than ever!
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Micamo » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 08:18

Ha ha ha NO
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by eldin raigmore » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 22:24

Bryan wrote:
Ossicone wrote:Am I the only one who likes reading the packages with lots of languages? :-s
Nope, I do too.
So do I.

Another thing I like to do: If I get a DVD with at least two other (than English) spoken languages, and at least two other (than English) subtitle languages, I like to watch it with every combination. For instance if it's got Spanish and French and German soundtracks, and Spanish, French, German, Japanese, and Korean subtitles, I'll watch it with all 24 combinations of spoken (English, French, German, Spanish) and subtitled (English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish) languages.

(Well, actually, I don't know if I'd go that far. Usually it's just English, French, and Spanish both in the soundtrack and in the subtitles; and the weirdest things I do are French soundtrack with Spanish subtitles, and Spanish soundtrack with French subtitles.)

Anyone else like to do anything similar?
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Re: European IAL pro's and con's (for school)

Post by Xing » Mon 07 Nov 2011, 22:29

eldin raigmore wrote:
Bryan wrote:
Ossicone wrote:Am I the only one who likes reading the packages with lots of languages? :-s
Nope, I do too.
So do I.

Another thing I like to do: If I get a DVD with at least two other (than English) spoken languages, and at least two other (than English) subtitle languages, I like to watch it with every combination. For instance if it's got Spanish and French and German soundtracks, and Spanish, French, German, Japanese, and Korean subtitles, I'll watch it with all 24 combinations of spoken (English, French, German, Spanish) and subtitled (English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish) languages.

(Well, actually, I don't know if I'd go that far. Usually it's just English, French, and Spanish both in the soundtrack and in the subtitles; and the weirdest things I do are French soundtrack with Spanish subtitles, and Spanish soundtrack with French subtitles.)

Anyone else like to do anything similar?
I use to switch language (subtitles and/or spoken) when watching DVDs
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