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PostPosted: Wed 11 Oct 2017, 17:18 
fire
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There's a common rhyme in English-speaking countries that goes something like:
"See a penny and pick it up:
"All day long you'll have good luck.
"See a penny and let it lie:
"You'll need that penny before you die!"

For some versions it's a "pin" instead of a "penny".
And for some the last line is something like "That very day you'll die!" or something else much more dire than "You'll need that penny/pin before you die".




When I've tried to say this rhyme to L2-English-speakers, they seem not to understand what it's about.
What about folks on the CBB? Do all or most our L1-English-speakers get it? Do any or many of our English-as-L2-speakers get it?
For CBBeans who are well-versed in other languages, what are similar proverbs (or nursery-rhymes or whatever) in your own languages?

ObConLang; How would your conspeakers say this in your conlang (if they even would)?

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PostPosted: Wed 11 Oct 2017, 17:43 
roman
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I'm German; for me, I don't really get what there would propably be not to get. Unless it's from some movie or something like that, it's pretty straightforward without its meaning obscured in any ways. In German, there is a similar phrase; its literal meaning and also its figurative meaning are different, but it's propably said in a very similar context.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt, ist die Mark nicht wert.
[vɛɐ̯ deːn ˈ͡pfɛnɪç nɪçt ʔɛɐ̯t, ʔɪst di ˈmaɐ̯k nɨçt vɛɐ̯t]
who.NOM DEF.MASC.ACC penny NEG revere.3SG, COP.3SG DEF.FEM.ACC mark NEG worthy
Who doesn't revere the Pfennig, is not worthy to have the Mark.

(Mark is the ancient German currency; it was divided into 100 Pfennige, hence the proverb)

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PostPosted: Wed 11 Oct 2017, 19:39 
mongolian
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There is also a similar:

:deu: German
Spare in der Zeit, dann hast du in der Not.
/ʃpaːʁə ʔɪn deɐ̯ t͡saɪ̯t̚ dan hast duː ʔɪn deɐ̯ noːt/
save in DEF.F.SG.DAT time, then have.2SG you in DEF.F.SG.DAT times.of.need
Save (money) in time, then you will have it in times of need.

This one and Iyionaku's version I think are similar in different aspects to the English one. Iyionaku's is pretty overtly about a penny, whereas mine stresses he difference in time between keeping the money and profiting from it. I must admit that I like Iyionaku's better, because it rhymes. I was really confused as a child about mine because it doesn't. I was always expecting some word that rhymes with Zeit instead of Not.

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PostPosted: Wed 11 Oct 2017, 20:13 
MVP
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I've only directly encountered a variant form, promulgated in the novels of Terry Pratchett:

See a pin and pick it up,
All day long you'll have a pin.



To the Germans: I believe the English saying used to be used literally - that is, it's about literally picking up pennies from the floor (or pins, or other potentially useful or valuable things), rather than more general advice about the importance of investment and prudent financial management.


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PostPosted: Wed 11 Oct 2017, 20:16 
mongolian
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Good to know. Actually Iyionaku's version is used in these situations, IINM.

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Oct 2017, 05:06 
korean
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Joined: Sun 25 Nov 2012, 10:39
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eldin raigmore wrote:
"See a penny and pick it up:
"All day long you'll have good luck.
"See a penny and let it lie:
"You'll need that penny before you die!"
I've never seen/heard the last two lines of this 'til now, which does put a slightly different spin on it. So:
Salmoneus wrote:
I believe the English saying used to be used literally - that is, it's about literally picking up pennies from the floor (or pins, or other potentially useful or valuable things), rather than more general advice about the importance of investment and prudent financial management.
I've always taken it literally -- finding a coin on the street and picking it up is good luck. Works a lot of the time, but if nothing else, it makes me smile inside (though the near-rhyme still grates).

For pithy penny advice on fiscal prudence, I'd run with, "A penny saved is a penny earned." or "Take care of the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves."

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Oct 2017, 05:36 
fire
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Salmoneus wrote:
I've only directly encountered a variant form, promulgated in the novels of Terry Pratchett:
See a pin and pick it up,
All day long you'll have a pin.

[:D] [:)] [xD] Lolirl@t!

----------

Thanks, everybody so far!

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Oct 2017, 06:01 
cuneiform
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L1-English-speaker: Nope, I've never heard of this rhyme.
Bilingual: Nope, I don't think there's a similar proverb.
Conlang: You ask for it, you got it. In a literal context:

:con: griuskant (without the conscript)

oc jiska muir, zher kauzar.
/ɔtʃ 'dʒiska 'muir, ʒər 'kauzar/
if see-V shininess, then take-V-IMP
If you see shininess, take it.

Because, if you see something that is shiny on the floor, why not pick it up? "Ooh, shiny!"

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Oct 2017, 18:12 
fire
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Reyzadren wrote:
....
Conlang: You ask for it, you got it. In a literal context:
:con: griuskant (without the conscript)
oc jiska muir, zher kauzar.
/ɔtʃ 'dʒiska 'muir, ʒər 'kauzar/
if see-V shininess, then take-V-IMP
If you see shininess, take it.


Because, if you see something that is shiny on the floor, why not pick it up? "Ooh, shiny!"

[:)]

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PostPosted: Sat 14 Oct 2017, 12:44 
earth
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Creyeditor wrote:
There is also a similar:

:deu: German
Spare in der Zeit, dann hast du in der Not.
/ʃpaːʁə ʔɪn deɐ̯ t͡saɪ̯t̚ dan hast duː ʔɪn deɐ̯ noːt/
save in DEF.F.SG.DAT time, then have.2SG you in DEF.F.SG.DAT times.of.need
Save (money) in time, then you will have it in times of need.

This one and Iyionaku's version I think are similar in different aspects to the English one. Iyionaku's is pretty overtly about a penny, whereas mine stresses he difference in time between keeping the money and profiting from it. I must admit that I like Iyionaku's better, because it rhymes. I was really confused as a child about mine because it doesn't. I was always expecting some word that rhymes with Zeit instead of Not.



There are a few of these in :us-pa: :deu:, but the pin one stands out in my memory:

:us-pa: :deu:

Wammern Schpel uf em Bodem leie sēnt sie mit em Kopp gēǧich em bedeits Glick.
INDEF.ANIM.SG needle.SG PRP DEF.N.DAT.SG floor lie<INF> see<PRS>PL 3SG.F.NOM PRP DEF.N.DAT.SG head.SG tóward REL.DAT.SG mean<PRS>3SG good.luck.SG
When someone sees a needle lying on the floor, it with it's head towards {you} means Good Luck.

Apparently, the opposite is also true:

Wann en Schpel uff em Bodem leit, un mer sēnt sie mit em Kopp gēǧich em hot mer unglich.
ADV INDEF.N.SG needle.SG PRP PRP DEF.N.DAT.SG floor lie<PRS>3SG CNJ 1PL.NOM see<PRS>PL 3SG.F.NOM PRP DEF.N.DAT.SG head.SG tóward REL.DAT.SG
have<PRS>3SG 1PL.DAT unlucky.SG
If a needle lies on the floor, and we see it with it's head towards {us}, for us this means bad luck.

They also talk about the Glick/Unglick of finding money on the street, but I'm not getting into that now. Bobbeli is going ufflein.
Discuss amongst yerselves:

:roll:

Q.V. :
https://books.google.com/books?id=TeaAA ... an&f=false

'Tis interesting, tho.
:wat:


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PostPosted: Sat 14 Oct 2017, 18:07 
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Your :us-pa: :deu: reminds me that I learned a corollary to "see a penny". It's only good luck to pick up a penny if it's heads-up. Tails-up is bad luck. I have the impression there might have been a rhyme explaining that, too, but if there was, I can't remember it.


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Oct 2017, 10:02 
roman
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Joined: Sun 25 May 2014, 13:17
Posts: 1399
Creyeditor wrote:
There is also a similar:

:deu: German
Spare in der Zeit, dann hast du in der Not.
/ʃpaːʁə ʔɪn deɐ̯ t͡saɪ̯t̚ dan hast duː ʔɪn deɐ̯ noːt/
save in DEF.F.SG.DAT time, then have.2SG you in DEF.F.SG.DAT times.of.need
Save (money) in time, then you will have it in times of need.

This one and Iyionaku's version I think are similar in different aspects to the English one. Iyionaku's is pretty overtly about a penny, whereas mine stresses he difference in time between keeping the money and profiting from it. I must admit that I like Iyionaku's better, because it rhymes. I was really confused as a child about mine because it doesn't. I was always expecting some word that rhymes with Zeit instead of Not.


It's a different kind of poetry in my opinion. You can see a parallelism between the first half of your sentence and the second. Also, it has a clear meter (trochee) so it's valid even if not rhyming I think.

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I had a mantra on the moss and I had to go to bed.


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