French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

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Dormouse559
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French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Dormouse559 » Sat 31 Mar 2018, 00:53

:eng: English

You want me to go buy you french fries when I just told you my boyfriend dumped me?

For context, the speaker is female, and she is talking to her female friend on the phone in a disbelieving tone.



:con: Silvish

Tu me veut qu' o t' ahhatê de fricasyâ can que jou van de te dîre que mi compã eu m' a-t lesyâ hîvre ?
[ty.məˈvœt ko.tah.həˈtɛː de.fʁi.kəˈsjɑː kɑ̃ŋ.ke.ʑuˈvɑ̃ŋ de.təˈdiː.ʁə ke.mi.kɔ̃ˈpɑ ʔø.ma.tləˈsjɑː ˈhiː.vʁə]
2SG-NOM 1SG want-2SG SBRD go.SBJV to 2SG buy-GER PART french_fry when SBRD 1SG.NOM have_just.SBJV.1SG of 2SG tell-INF SBRD 1SG-POSS.M.N* boyfriend 3SG.NOM 1SG have.3SG let-PST_PTCP.F fall-INF

* N = "noble" or human-associated gender
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All4Ɇn
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by All4Ɇn » Sat 31 Mar 2018, 04:03

:con: Ởnh·Vú
倅𤴓𠋥㦖步吧𧷸煎澟亝、倅𠸥㵋芻朱𠋥倅𧶮仉伴𢪱倅耒喂?
Cư dõc hanh kéinh lảt đãn ví sã·pòm·té, cư pãr bã·ro cơ hanh cư mờ ta·bàn lưy cư húy yớ?
1s.FAM TOP 2s.FAM want go PART buy fry-potato 1s.FAM tell new PREP 2s.FAM 1s.FAM PREP boyfriend dump 1s.FAM behind PART
Last edited by All4Ɇn on Wed 25 Apr 2018, 16:01, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Reyzadren » Sat 31 Mar 2018, 22:41

:con: griuskant (without the conscript)

ost skuya aesk kana snecnoes vozh aesk thusti kiga ki ost zhaed aeskae juisk eshthafa aesk urva?
/'ɔst 'skuja 'esk 'kana 'snətʃnɯs vɔʒ 'esk 'θusti 'kiga ki 'ɔst ʒed 'eske 'dʒuisk 'əʃθafa 'esk urva/
2SG want-V 1SG get-V "frenchfries" during 1SG new-A talk-V to 2SG COMP 1SG-POSS partner reverse.love-V 1SG Q
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Iyionaku » Sun 01 Apr 2018, 10:46

:con: Yélian

Ivabei pi rat ilovu bòmesan aquis sat yitistiylai pi reo gimir rat yicivuvet?
[ˈiːʋɐbɛɪ̯ pɨ ɾɐt ɨˈloːʋu ˈbɔ̈məsɐn ˈakɨs sɐt ɕɨtɨsˈta̯iːlaɪ̯ pɨ ˈɾe.ɔ̈ ˈxiːmɨd̟ ɾɐt ɕɨkɨˈʋuːʋət]
want-have-2SG that 1SG.OBL buy-INV.2SG fries-PL after 2SG.OBL PST-just-tell-1SG that 1SG.POSS boyfriend 1SG.OBL PST-dump-3SG
You want me to go buy you french fries when I just told you my boyfriend dumped me?

This was quite difficult, and I'm not sure if I nailed it 100%. I dumped the "go" part, because the sentence would have become overly complicated. Some issues I had to face:

1) "You want me to X" would normally require the prefix if- before a verb, but as the main verb already has two objects, this was not doable (you cannot combine if- with indirect objects because the actor is already the indirect object in Yélian). Hence I decided to create a subordinate clause: Ivabei pi... - "You want to have that...".
2) I decided to use inversion here: "rat ilovu bòmesan" literally means "by me, you are bought french fries". While in Yélian this doesn't sound as awkward, it is still somewhat marked. But usually the pronoun that is the topic is written out (and this is almost always the object pronoun) so I decided to use "rat" (me) instead of "sat" (you).
3) "French fries" is pòmes in Yélian, a German loan word. I'm not sure if the plural really should undergo stop lenition and become bòmesan or rather pòmesan.
4) The conjunction aquis actually means "after", but nat (when) would not have suited here because it implies that the actions are parallel.
5) "To dump" is civuva in Yélian, literally "not connect". Now this fucked with me a lot. Every skilled student of Yélian knows that ci- is the negation prefix, of course. The negation prefix always precedes tense prefixes, so it should be yicivuvet (he dumped me), right? Well no, civuva is considered a lexical unit and hence you cannot split it in two halves. The yi- has to come beforehand.
Last edited by Iyionaku on Mon 02 Apr 2018, 20:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Lao Kou » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 11:44

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Öçek la, içteshtanö sí lö öçkek, gü cha víesans síten lö sít höihof sho, í íaugavel sho, gü sí lí öçkek söik frítsöich ba vazh haukadiz sho, höhüraf?
2SG-NOM AUX.PRES, after 1SG-NOM AUX.PRESPRF 2SG-DAT, CONJ DEF boyfriend-NOM my-NOM AUX.PRESPRF 1SG-ACC dump-DISC PTCL, just tell PTCL, CONJ 1SG-NOM AUX.FUT 2SG-DAT INDEF.PL French.fry-ACC.PL PTCL buy go-SPEC PTCL, want-INTERR
You want me to go buy you french fries when I just told you my boyfriend dumped me?
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Salmoneus
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Salmoneus » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 16:11

Complicated!

This is just off the top of my head and may contain errors, but I think the Wenthish would be:

Ná will thu sa that ie gá at keypung thie chips, ay ie afters tellung thie as hu me boy mie hav ydumpt?
NEG intend you so COMP I go to buy-PTCP you fries, and I after-ADV tell-PTCP you COMP COMP my boyfriend I-ACC AUX PTCP-dump-PTCP

Lit. you don't intend (so) that I go about buying you fries, and me after telling you as how my boyfriend has dumped me?

There's a number of tricky bits in here. For example:
- negative of surprise. Lack of negative concord, which does not extend into complements.
- gá ought to be in the subjunctive; but as it happens, this is a defective verb in which the subjunctive is the same as the indicative
- language-learning books will normally tell you to say gue here instead, the irregular first-person. This is what you'll find in most writing, or in more formal contexts; but only the oldest and most rigid speakers maintain the irregularity in intimate speech between friends.
- is keype the right verb here? I don't know - I guess there's some complexity in the lexicon around trade (eg English buy vs get vs purchase vs trade), which I haven't worked out, so i've just gone with something simple
- I don't know what the OP means by "French fries". Wenthish has a three-way distinction: pommes frite (or pofritte) are ordinary chips, and can loosely describe any chips; chips are specifically thick, greasy chips often found as take-away food*; frąys are specifically fries (i.e. thin, oily, American-style chips). The first is not an option here - that would mean, say, going into a restaurant, ordering a side order of chips, and walking out with them. That would be weird. The latter two are both options, but I think the former is more common given that the OP says "go buy you", suggesting a takeaway, rather than a fast-food evening out.
- I've not worked out the intricacies of terminology for young people and objects of affection, but I think boy will do here.
- dumpe is a rather informal, slang word, and wouldn't be found among older speakers; it also perhaps wouldn't be used much among more educated speakers, and it is somewhat derogatory to the person 'dumped'. In most cases some other expression (equivalent to 'he left me' or 'he ended it') would be used; however, given the context of an intimate discussion between two young female friends, I think the more forceful word is appropriate here.



*the Wenthish have long enjoyed flour-fried fish, probably introduced in the early modern era from Portugal; it remains a staple dish. However, at some point in the late 19th or early 20th centuries, the influence of British sailors has lead to the development of English-style fish-and-chips (beer-battered fish, greasy chips, vinegar) as a ubiquitous takeaway meal. The introduction of McDonalds into the country, and with it American-style French fries, is much more recent, and has only penetrated the larger cities; nonetheless, McDonalds is a fashionable place for young urban people to congregate.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by spanick » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 19:54

Sortsbergish (Modern Gotski)

Tu veljš te ek budžo ten frais after ek sonu gakod ten te mens majos men gavas abvorpans?
2S.NOM IMPR.want-2S that 1S.NOM IMPR.buy-1S.SJV 2S.GEN “French fries” after 1S.NOM just.now PFV-say\PRT-1S 2S.GEN that 2S.GEN-MS.NOM boy-MS.NOM 2S.GEN PFV-be\PRT-3S off.throw-PP
"You want me to go buy you french fries when I just told you my boyfriend dumped me?"
More literally "You want that I buy you fries after I just now told you that my boyfriend had thrown me away?"

Some bonus vocabulary discussion.
Spoiler:
Frais is undeclinable and refers to American style French Fries which are quite popular among younger speakers. Another option would be pomfrit but this doesn't have the youth-slang feel associated with frais.

Majos is a modern slang for boyfriend and most common in the South and in urban areas. The more neutral/dictionary term would be friods "friend". Dečko, a borrowing from Serbo-Croation, is common in the North.

Abverpan means to throw off or throw away and is indeed used when referring to trash. Its use in referring to the ending of relationships is also common but has a particularly negative and harsh connotation. Another slang term for this is abladžan "to set aside".
Last edited by spanick on Mon 02 Apr 2018, 20:45, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Dormouse559 » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 20:35

Salmoneus wrote:
Mon 02 Apr 2018, 16:11
- I don't know what the OP means by "French fries". Wenthish has a three-way distinction: pommes frite (or pofritte) are ordinary chips, and can loosely describe any chips; chips are specifically thick, greasy chips often found as take-away food*; frąys are specifically fries (i.e. thin, oily, American-style chips). The first is not an option here - that would mean, say, going into a restaurant, ordering a side order of chips, and walking out with them. That would be weird. The latter two are both options, but I think the former is more common given that the OP says "go buy you", suggesting a takeaway, rather than a fast-food evening out.
My interpretation is that the friend wants the speaker to go to a fast-food restaurant, order (American-style) french fries, and walk out with them. The act may be unusual, but that shouldn't rule it out. There's no law against it, and the restaurant certainly won't refuse your money.

Thanks for the detailed breakdown. It was quite intriguing to read.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Odkidstr » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 21:48

Obligatory this language is in it's beginnings, things are subject to change, and after a long hiatus from conlanging, I'm so rusty and am probably doing something wrong or stupid. I really need to learn how to set my signature I guess. I'm always open to constructive feedback on my conlangs.

This really confused me until I parsed the English sentence alternatively into: You want for me to...

Notes are below translation.

You want me to go buy you french fries when I just told you my boyfriend dumped me?

nesi ttoth seto shui lad saí gonaon nazdeon/tlinchon neses, nu shutin fufu shoí nesi seto kopanitin shuk xlid nazde klaz shui hu
[nes.i ʈʰoð se.tʰo ʃu.i lad saɪ gə.na.ən naz.deɪ.ən/tlintʃ.ən nes.es nu ʃu.tʰin fu.fu ʃoɪ nes.i se.tʰo kʰo.pʰa.ni.tʰin ʃuk xlid naz.deɪ klaz ʃu.i hu]
2sg-Nom want SUBR 1sg-Nom buy IRR potato-Pl-Acc snake/chef-Pl-Acc 2sg-Dat when 1SG-Erg talk just 2SG-Abs SUBR partner-Erg 1sg-Gen leave snake ADV 1sg-Abs INTERROGATIVE

Lit, You want that I would buy Snake/Chef Potatoes for you, when I just told you that my partner/mate snakily(deceptively) lit. like a snake left me?

Notes

Erg/Abs occurs in the Past tense, Nom/Acc in the Present tense.
SUBR stands for Subordinate. Basically "that" in English. I haven't really decided how to handle complement clauses, but as "seto" is used in relative clauses, I felt that it stood to be borrowed here.
I'm really bad with the Irrealis mood. I think I've used it properly here, though part of me wonders if I should have used the conditional mood instead.
I currently have no way to derive ADJ from nouns or verbs, so it was hard for the below issue with Snake and Chef. ADJs take case and number, so I figured that may be enough.
I didn't really feel like adding a word for fries, so I used potato instead. I couldn't decide on how I'd like to form french fries, leaving me with two derivations: Snake potatoes or Chef's Potatoes. Thus nazde/tlinch above (snake & chef respectively).
I'm not sure about "just." I have no aspect like the durative, which I imagine could have been used here. Something about using the word "just" bugs me though, feels so Englishy, but I don't know if there's really a way to replace it otherwise.
I also don't have a way to derive Adverbs. For now, I made do with an awkward construction: similar to/like a snake. Where nazde is snake, and is followed by klaz which is a particle to indicate something is like something else (and is also used in comparative statements). So the idea is that above, it reads "my partner left me like a snake" or "my partner left me snakily/deceptively." Adverbs don't take any agreement, so there was nothing else to do. Klaz was glossed as ADV to indicate it was essentially turning the word before it, nazde, into an adverb. I don't know if this is a decent way to form adverbs or not.
I forgot how to gloss an Interrogative clause, but that stands for "hu" which is attached to pronouns to form interrogative clauses. I haven't technically decided to handle simple questions like this, so this may or may not actually be how this language handles this.
My phonology rules really have to be looked at. One day I shall design a unique, functional phonology.
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Imralu » Thu 05 Apr 2018, 15:10

:tan: Swahili:
:aus: English:

Unataka niende kakununulie chipsi wakati nimekuambia kwamba mpenzi wangu ameachana nami?
u-na-tak(a) ni-end(a)-e ka-ku-nunu(a)-li(a)-e chipsi wakati ni-me-ku-ambi(a) kwamba mpenzi w-angu a-me-ach(a)-an(a) na-mi
2S-PRES-want 1S-go-SBJV CONSEQ-2S-buy-APPL-SBJV chips time(CL11) 1S-PRF-2S-tell C beloved(CL1) CL1-GEN.1S CL1-PRF-leave-RECIP COM-1S
You want me to go and buy you chips when I've just told you my boyfriend's dumped me?
Glossing Abbreviations: COMP = comparative, C = complementiser, ACS / ICS = accessible / inaccessible, GDV = gerundive, SPEC / NSPC = specific / non-specific, AG = agent, E = entity (person, animal, thing)
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Re: French fries? My boyfriend dumped me.

Post by Birdlang » Sat 07 Apr 2018, 13:54

Pigeonese
Nyanh seu wèyh-ayé-ajé, frāyz cawé caw, nühöm yatzë kawëuhñyomuluki dyevoiko nyaqsühli awañhtakkičuah nedûmp?
2sg-FEM-inf want inf-buy-1sg-FEM-inf fries why-PL why, when 1sg-FEM-inf buy-edibles boyfriend exaggerated-just ran-away-crazy dump-1sg-FEM-inf
/ɲɑ̃ sɯ weɪ̯h aɪ.jɛʒ frɑːɪs ʦɔɛ̯ kɒ ɳʉɵ̯m ja.ʦə ka.wɜ̃ː.jo.mu.lu.ci ɟe.ɰɔɪ̯.kɔ ɲɑʔ.syːʎ a.wɒ̃.taʔʲ.ʧʷɑː nɤ.dʉ̃p/
Some notes
The informal I am using is one degree, but it’s very informal and it’s usually used in situations like this. And all pronouns are distinguished between male/female and formal/very formal/informal/very informal/extremely, almost rudely. informal (this case)
There are no cases in the grammar.
Boyfriend is dyevoiko which comes from Slavic. Girlfriend would be dyevoika.
Fries are distinguished in 4 kinds. flaxseed gruel and flour based fries (they are birdlike humanoid people with extended mouths, duh) are nčomkañh, chips are čips, frāyz is French fries a la McDonalds or fast food places (in their country they have a similar one), and mlüy are woodsfowl jerky covered in flour breading and stuffed with bread. A woodsfowl is a bird native to their country.
Dûmp is very very informal. The more proper term would be träengh (which means literally outcasted).
The Latin script I use is the internet friendly one because the current one has a lot of fancy characters.
Ꭓꭓ Ʝʝ Ɬɬ Ɦɦ Ɡɡ Ɥɥ Ɫɫ Ɽɽ Ɑɑ Ɱɱ Ɐɐ Ɒɒ Ɓɓ Ɔɔ Ɖɖ Ɗɗ Əə Ɛɛ Ɠɠ Ɣɣ Ɯɯ Ɲɲ Ɵɵ Ʀʀ Ʃʃ Ʈʈ Ʊʊ Ʋʋ Ʒʒ Ꞵꞵ Ʉʉ Ʌʌ Ŋŋ Ɂɂ Ɪɪ Ææ Øø Ð𠌜 Ɜɜ Ǝɘ
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