Search found 371 matches

by cedh
14 Jun 2019 18:23
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 202
Views: 34146

Re: Silvish

You're welcome!
by cedh
12 Jun 2019 17:32
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 202
Views: 34146

Re: Silvish

So, if I understand it correctly: - a stressed penult will always be followed by a syllable with an unstressed short vowel - an unstressed penult will always be followed by a stressed final syllable - a final syllable with a long vowel will always be stressed If the above is true, I would suggest th...
by cedh
09 Jun 2019 11:30
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 202
Views: 34146

Re: Silvish

Can you give a few example words with unstressed long vowels in the penult? Maybe you can find a rule for when these occur...
by cedh
21 May 2019 13:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6965
Views: 839662

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Here's an elaborate explanation (in German). The main points, summarized in English: The simple past has its main use as a narrative past tense , especially in the written language. Reading/hearing a text that uses this form feels kind of like watching a film, where events are reported without rega...
by cedh
02 May 2019 15:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6965
Views: 839662

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In Germanic languages apart from English, do participles ever get used in clauses like particularly in the classical IE languages? eg. :eng: Having entered the city/upon entering the city, we proceeded to look for the king. :lat: Civitatem ingressi, regni inquirere processimus. German can do this: ...
by cedh
22 Apr 2019 23:46
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Yes. (Although your system is a bit unusual in that you are marking inverse voice on the unexpected agent rather than on the verb, which makes it superficially look a bit like a kind of "pseudo-ergative" case with a slightly odd distribution.)
by cedh
11 Apr 2019 08:14
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5181
Views: 634924

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

I agree with sangi39 that the lack of /tsʼ tɬʼ/ is fairly unusual in such an inventory, but given your relatively simple syllable structure, this lack is easy to explain with diachronics: Suppose an earlier stage of the language had no glottalized consonants, with only /p t k ʔ/ as voiceless stops, ...
by cedh
07 Mar 2019 00:09
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I see. That's how applicatives on a transitive base often work, and yes, it would be like swapping arguments. But what if you change both the case and the word order, like I suggested above: John-NOM letter-ALL/DAT pen-ACC write-APPL or John-NOM letter-ACC pen-ACC write-APPL Would any of the above s...
by cedh
06 Mar 2019 09:16
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Does your language already have an alternative ditransitive construction distinct from donor-[nominative] recipient-[accusative] VERB theme-[instrumental] , where the relative focus level of recipient and theme is different? If yes, I'd suggest using that construction for applicativized verbs too. W...
by cedh
05 Mar 2019 11:46
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

There are languages where applicativized versions of transitive or ditransitive verbs do not actually increase valency, but instead demote the original object to oblique status. Sometimes this demoted object is marked with the same case or adposition that the applied object used to have before appli...
by cedh
28 Feb 2019 08:45
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5181
Views: 634924

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

What about [+/-nasal], [+/-dorsal], [+/-labial], giving something like the following? /p t/ /kʷ k/ /m n/ /ŋʷ ŋ/ This could even be expanded to vowels: /y i/ /u ɑ/ /ỹ ĩ/ /ũ ɑ̃/ Or else, [+/-voiced], [+/-continuant], [+/-labial]: /p t~k/ /b~m d~ɡ~n~ŋ/ /f s~ʃ~x~h/ /w r~l~j/ Depending on whether you cou...
by cedh
09 Dec 2018 10:29
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: British Romance Language Collablang
Replies: 337
Views: 63342

Re: British Romance Language Collablang

98: a 99: b 100: d: /f v s z ʃ/ - <f~ff f s~ss s sci~sc> (/f s/ would be <f s> word-initially and adjacent to a consonant, and <ff ss> intervocalically. /ʃ/ would be <sci> before back vowels and <sc> before front vowels, i.e. the same orthographic alternation as with /tʃ/ <ci~c> in 99b.) 101: b Can ...
by cedh
06 Dec 2018 08:24
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Verb-medial (SVO) languages tend not to be ergative/absolutive. See http://aveneca.com/cbb/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=1454&p=60979&hilit=Verb+medial+non+ergative#p60979 http://aveneca.com/cbb/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=1454&p=72868&hilit=Verb+medial+non+ergative#p72868 http://aveneca.com/cbb/viewtopic.php?f=29...
by cedh
22 Nov 2018 18:22
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6965
Views: 839662

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Does anyone know of a natural language where the grammatical marking of a certain type of oblique object is suppletive based on the number, definiteness, or topicality of the subject of the clause? For example, a language that regularly uses one adposition to mark a certain type of oblique object wh...
by cedh
19 Nov 2018 17:34
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Quick Diachronics Challenge
Replies: 663
Views: 127650

Re: Quick Diachronics Challenge

Spoiler:
My guess for the earliest proto-word (after reading Sangi's latest reconstruction) would be *ambəkdɨ, with a prenasalised stop and two central vowels.
by cedh
15 Nov 2018 09:49
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14754
Views: 1255089

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

For north and south, you could also use boreal and austral respectively.
by cedh
13 Nov 2018 09:14
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6965
Views: 839662

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I just discovered today that German has a very unproductive progressive passive that I would really like to see expanded. You nominalize the verb by taking the stem and attaching a schwa. The resulting noun is of feminine gender and gets a definite determiner inside a locational copula construction...
by cedh
31 Oct 2018 09:07
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: In Other Community News...
Replies: 10
Views: 11865

Re: In Other Community News...

NEWS YOU CAN USE! The Language Creation Society is pleased as pomegranate punch to announce the venue and particulars for the eighth Language Creation Conference (LCC8). I’d be curious to know which (if any) members of this forum have attended these events, and if so, what their impressions were. I...
by cedh
30 Oct 2018 19:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Writing sound changes so I understand later
Replies: 4
Views: 1963

Re: Writing sound changes so I understand later

OK, so you want medial clusters only, and are not really in favor of word-final consonants. This means your sound changes could look something like this: a > ɐ / _ except #(C)_ and C_# ɐ > Ø / VC_CV (starting at the beginning of a word, and targeting the next vowel only if the preceding vowel hasn't...
by cedh
30 Oct 2018 09:10
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5181
Views: 634924

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Porphyrogenitos wrote:
30 Oct 2018 06:12
It's horrifying, and brilliant. Horrifying in an impressive way.
[+1]