Search found 1294 matches

by Salmoneus
19 Feb 2020 14:51
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift
Replies: 10
Views: 166

Re: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift

Indeed. It's not directly known that stressed open syllables were long, but the consensus seems to be that many sound changes across the family are most easily explained if we assume that at least some of them were (though I've seen some people suggest that some weren't, depending on the word's phon...
by Salmoneus
19 Feb 2020 01:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift
Replies: 10
Views: 166

Re: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift

In English the kink is a: -> ɛː, which, to me, is an absolutely strange fronting. It seems a little easier to swallow once you learn that Late Latin underwent [a:] > [e:] into Old French (while short [a] was retained), and that Old Arabic /a a:/ often become /e: e/ in Lebanese Arabic when stressed ...
by Salmoneus
18 Feb 2020 01:35
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 703
Views: 187787

Re: False cognates

Latin: tradere (to transmit, deliver, surrender or hand over) Which is the source of :eng: "traitor", as Christians who handed over sacred texts to Roman persecutors were derisively called by the nominal form of the Latin by other Christians I'm very skeptical. As I say, the word developed the mean...
by Salmoneus
18 Feb 2020 01:25
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 385
Views: 253741

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

It's also harder to discern the mood of a musical piece, it seems, when there's not a human voice singing it. I find the opposite. But also: really!? Listen to this... and (at least a few minutes of) this.. and then this... Most people would say I think that one of those pieces was (other than some...
by Salmoneus
17 Feb 2020 23:08
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 385
Views: 253741

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Makes sense, I just assumed there couldn't be anyone who's on the internet who hasn't heard of them since they were mentioned literally everywhere when they released their first album. Just to broaden your horizons a little bit: I've heard the Beatles and Jimi Hendrix, and I've heard OF Taylor Swif...
by Salmoneus
17 Feb 2020 23:04
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 385
Views: 253741

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

... Hmm, interesting... for some reason I always thought there was a difference between "psychopaths" and psychopaths, as in there are those who are like what you described and they're called psychopaths but that the literal definition still referred to the type that have no real emotions whatsoeve...
by Salmoneus
16 Feb 2020 21:34
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift
Replies: 10
Views: 166

Re: Apparently Old Prussian underwent the Great Vowel Shift

As I understand it, similar changes occured in Dutch (long high vowel breaking), German (long high vowel breaking, long vowel raising), Danish (long front vowel raising), and Norwegian and Swedish (long back vowel raising). There was also extensive long vowel breaking in Icelandic, but in a less str...
by Salmoneus
13 Feb 2020 22:27
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 385
Views: 253741

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

To puncture a common urban myth: psychopaths are not emotionless. Quite the contrary! Psychopaths (if they exist at all as a distinct group, which is controversial) are characterised by emotionally impulsive behaviour, aggression and hostility, and an obsessive need for control. They do show relativ...
by Salmoneus
12 Feb 2020 20:19
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: “No yeah no” and “yeah no yeah”
Replies: 10
Views: 189

Re: “No yeah no” and “yeah no yeah”

Wiktionary alleges that English 'rusk' (stale bread crushed and used as filler in making cheap sausages) is derived from Spanish 'rosca' (the arc-shaped trajectory of a football struck with side-spin).

Etymology is a strange land.
by Salmoneus
11 Feb 2020 15:48
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)
Replies: 9
Views: 200

Re: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)

There are some really fun combinations that come from this, probably the most well known (at least the person is) being Sofía Margarita Vergara Vergara, daughter of Julio Enrique Vergara Robayo and his wife Margarita Vergara de Vergara. I have no idea who those people are, but there's a famous cycl...
by Salmoneus
11 Feb 2020 15:05
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: “No yeah no” and “yeah no yeah”
Replies: 10
Views: 189

Re: “No yeah no” and “yeah no yeah”

"yes" and "no" (and variants) serve not just as answers, but as pragmatic devices relating to emotion, attitude, and relationships. Off the top of my head: "Yes" is typically used to: - signal respect for and understanding with the previous speaker, and a desire to remain allied with them - signal a...
by Salmoneus
10 Feb 2020 19:51
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)
Replies: 9
Views: 200

Re: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)

In all countries there is the primer nombre or first name, the segundo nombre or middle name Apparently in Spain, legally they can only have one forename - it's just that their forename has two parts. I'm not sure what if any significance this philosophical distinction is supposed to bear. Although...
by Salmoneus
10 Feb 2020 02:33
Forum: Translations
Topic: He is...
Replies: 83
Views: 24400

Re: He is...

A current attempt at Old Wenthish: 1. fiescáriamann ist sua hi biath éna fisherman EXIST so he COP one There's a fisherman that he is The natural and easy translation here is simply hi biath fiescáriamann . This, however, is better translated " he is a fisherman" - that is, it presents the pronoun a...
by Salmoneus
09 Feb 2020 22:49
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Sixth Conversation Thread
Replies: 79
Views: 13545

Re: The Sixth Conversation Thread

My sympathies. I honestly think this may be the hardest thing a lot of people will go through. I've had beloved relatives die, and I've had pets put down, and the latter is, for me, far, far more painful. I cared more about the relatives, of course - but that was just what happened, and I couldn't d...
by Salmoneus
09 Feb 2020 22:44
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Jotun:Aesir::Titans:Olympians?
Replies: 8
Views: 118

Re: Jotun:Aesir::Titans:Olympians?

My guess would be: - early Indo-European mythology involves wars between the gods. - these wars come to develop associations with good vs evil, order vs chaost, and sky vs earth - as a result, there are two sorts of war being spoken of: the moral war, in which the enemies are described as monstrous,...
by Salmoneus
09 Feb 2020 21:35
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)
Replies: 9
Views: 200

Re: Personal Naming conventions (How people are named in the world)

I'm a bit uneasy about the ethics of just reprinting other people's work en masse, even when you link to the source. Particularly since some of that is not from wikipedia, and thus may not be legally open-source. Perhaps it would in any case be more helpful, for you and for others, rather than copy-...
by Salmoneus
09 Feb 2020 17:09
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 385
Views: 253741

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

As I noted earlier, I would say - or at least write - " a round", not "round". Maybe this is the tone you're going for, but to me, "round" looks very informal, like the writer is trying to represent a spoken shortening of " a round". Although maybe this is just another dialectal issue, and for some...
by Salmoneus
09 Feb 2020 15:14
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Jotun:Aesir::Titans:Olympians?
Replies: 8
Views: 118

Re: Jotun:Aesir::Titans:Olympians?

Eldin, I think you may have been lead astray - or else you're making a distinction I don't understand. Although "titan" in English can be used as a synonym for "giant" in some contexts, the Greek Titans weren't just very tall creatures. They were gods, in the same way that the Olympians were - the '...
by Salmoneus
08 Feb 2020 23:13
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4489
Views: 937689

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Sal, the original poster wanted help deriving a word for daughter from the unattested PIE form, which had a /g/, not a /gʰ/. Fair enough. I was mislead by De Vaan wondering why there is no 'h' in the Oscan; /gH/ doesn't normally yield /h/, and the relevant sound changes seem to predate the Latin/Sa...
by Salmoneus
08 Feb 2020 17:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4489
Views: 937689

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

*the very cunning semantic shift there being an exercise for the interested reader... I imagine it has to do with food offerings and sacrifices. I vaguely remember a Germanic or Greek word that also showed a relationship between eating and the divine (do you happen to have any idea of what word I'm...