Search found 1618 matches

by Salmoneus
17 Jun 2019 13:32
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I think a confusion may be the choice of examples - the derivation from "I hit you" to "I make you wild" seems almost random, not a regular inflection. [if "I hit you" > "I make you wild", what does "I punch you" or "I kick you" inflect to?] However, you seem to have answered your own question regar...
by Salmoneus
08 Jun 2019 19:37
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 1730
Views: 345948

Re: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, I've got another climate question (maybe I'm just overthinking this). I've got this rough sketch of a planet: https://i.postimg.cc/Yqz5vjpL/rough-map.png The northern continent looks bound to be very humid, unless there's a serious rain shadow involved (and I plan not to have one). I wonder wha...
by Salmoneus
25 May 2019 12:43
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I am currently trying to debate the phonemic status of /j/ in my language. Historically, this phoneme became /d/ intervocally and was lost after a consonant, leaving it only in initial position. Would it be phonemic if it still made minimal pairs? Of course - being able to make minimal pairs is wha...
by Salmoneus
22 May 2019 00:10
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The language has three numbers singular, dual (form by infixing <-ϳ(ε)-> after a word's first vowel), and plural (formed by placing <-χϙο> after a dual's final vowel). Thus, "stars" translates to "υϳεδυχϙο." Considering the formation rules above, is Υϳεϸαυδυχϙο or Ϛϸαυϳεδυχϙο the more likely transl...
by Salmoneus
16 May 2019 22:14
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I'm no expert, but as a general guide, iirc I've encountered six different sources of tone: - loss or neutralisation of coda consonants. Generally fricatives lead to low tones, sfaiaa. However, tones can change around once they're created, so... anyway, glottal stops being lost can result in either ...
by Salmoneus
14 May 2019 22:26
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Tense usually isn't that important. On the rare occasions when it is important, it's usually clear from context - because if tense is important, it's because something is urgent, and urgency is usually made very clear from context. If someone tells you "house burn down", it's easy to tell if they me...
by Salmoneus
13 May 2019 21:47
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 777
Views: 221566

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Do you specifically need/want your characters all to be white? There's quite a few Franco-African surnames with diacritics. Dembélé , for instance*. Less commonly, Kéréku (as in the president). Or you could go the whole hog and have messers Đổng and Biện ... *I don't know, off hand, anyone who had a...
by Salmoneus
13 May 2019 00:14
Forum: Translations
Topic: Inventions of the 21st century
Replies: 6
Views: 273

Re: Inventions of the 21st century

virtuęl-litterbręð (if you mean a computer keyboard) virtuęl-tastor (if you mean a piano keyboard) sioselmigia (real-world term for certain websites) seussiąl medią (used in academic and conceptual discussions) stokerfrey loco (but sometimes seolfstoken loco , particular in dryer, more technical co...
by Salmoneus
12 May 2019 20:56
Forum: Translations
Topic: Inventions of the 21st century
Replies: 6
Views: 273

Re: Inventions of the 21st century

Fun fact: all of these things were invented in the 20th century. Touchscreens were developed in the 1960s, and came into widespread use during the 70s and 80s. Virtual keyboards in the western sense were around at least by 1993, with the Newton and the Simon (the first smartphone), though by then to...
by Salmoneus
12 May 2019 14:59
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Of course sound changes have exceptions. English is a fantastic case in point! A big part of why our spelling is so frustrating is the fact that English vowels in particular have been subjected to a whole bunch of irregular, uncompleted (and sometimes incompletely reversed!) sound shifts. Take "fath...
by Salmoneus
09 May 2019 13:38
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 1730
Views: 345948

Re: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Artistic decisions have to be acts of the artist. What critique can do, however, is show the artist what decisions they've made, and which decisions they've yet to make. Vivid works of art are generally the result of commiting to a coherent set of decisions - rather than vacillating between alternat...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2019 22:12
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Should Romanisations be "Necessary"?
Replies: 23
Views: 676

Re: Should Romanisations be "Necessary"?

"Should" is a vague word. It is obviously counterproductive not to use a romanisation. If you don't want people to have idea what your language is like, why are you even talking about it? But it shouldn't be a forum rule, of course. If, say, two Chinese forum members want to talk about a Sinitic lan...
by Salmoneus
06 May 2019 22:11
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14768
Views: 1256961

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I think I might be missing something here, or misreading something, or both. Why would stative verbs be transitive? They're not. What I'm asking is how would I treat a noun which is the subject of a stative verb when it is the subject of a transitive verb. I would say: how do you normally treat nou...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2019 01:56
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread
Replies: 1711
Views: 262707

Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

My experience is that America is positively littered with names there's no way to guess at the pronunciation of. I mean, one of your states is spelled 'Arkansas' - is that pronouncing it like it's spelled? Another state is spelled "Connecticut". Another is spelled "Illinois". And apparently 'Nevada'...
by Salmoneus
04 May 2019 19:46
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread
Replies: 1711
Views: 262707

Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Those British proper names can throw you for a loop. I remember coming across "Lerwick" and "overaccenting" it, assuming it must be pronounced "lerrick" or "lark" or something like that, but no, it's just /ˈlɜːrwɪk/, the way it's spelled. I guess one can't be blamed for assuming the pronunciation i...
by Salmoneus
03 May 2019 15:01
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: West Saxon Grammar Sketch v 0.0.1
Replies: 29
Views: 2152

Re: West Saxon Grammar Sketch v 0.0.1

I'll spare you all the details, as this isn't my thread, but after some reading around the subject, I've refined my article distinction along the lines of (though not identical with) the "strong"/"weak" definite distinction that occurs in many Germanic languages. This may be something you'd like to ...
by Salmoneus
28 Apr 2019 11:28
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: West Saxon Grammar Sketch v 0.0.1
Replies: 29
Views: 2152

Re: West Saxon Grammar Sketch v 0.0.1

FWIW, my own Wenthish does exactly the same thing. That is, it uses an as a broadly 'specific' article, distinct from the definite, with the indefinite unmarked. In my case, it's inspired by: - the fact that the indefinite article is not ancestral in germanic languages - there is no indefinite artic...
by Salmoneus
25 Apr 2019 16:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6967
Views: 840674

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What languages other than Celtic have word-initial consonant mutations expressing grammatical meanings? Celtic langs cannot be that unique it only appears in them. The classic answer here would be "Atlantic, Mande and Senufo" (three nearby and possibly related familes of northwest africa); the over...
by Salmoneus
25 Apr 2019 00:23
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6967
Views: 840674

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

A/O is a property of Polynesian languages - so called because in some languages, like Hawai'ian, there are two possessive prepositions, a and o . Conveniently enough, "a" possession seems associated with agents and "o" with objects. That is, "a" marks possessors who have high levels of control, domi...
by Salmoneus
23 Apr 2019 01:22
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6967
Views: 840674

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

This definitely happens in some languages with A/O possession - agents of verbal nouns take A-possession, patients take O-possession. I wouldn't be suprised if it happened in some alienability systems too (patients as inalienable, agents as alienable). [well, I'm not certain the verbal nouns in ques...