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by Salmoneus
17 Dec 2018 01:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: PhD Thesis About Constructed Languages
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: PhD Thesis About Constructed Languages

It should probably be pointed out that the group of people who make conlangs, and the much larger group of people who learn conlangs, actually have very little overlap, so far as I'm aware. Conlangers may have looked at famous conlangs, and maybe know a bit about them, but they tend not to be enthus...
by Salmoneus
16 Dec 2018 13:04
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

shimobaatar wrote:
15 Dec 2018 16:40
Salmoneus wrote:
15 Dec 2018 13:07
One last try: the neb- element does not mean 'nose'.
Does it refer to a part of an animal's body (beak/snout)?
Yes (it is used both for humans and some non-human animals).
by Salmoneus
15 Dec 2018 13:07
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

...no.


Well, sorry to have ruined your game.
One last try: the neb- element does not mean 'nose'.
by Salmoneus
08 Dec 2018 12:53
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lapdeutsch
Replies: 45
Views: 17223

Re: Lapdeutsch

wife/woman and man/husband are often the same terms, or at least there's often a great deal of overlap. In "man and wife", I don't know if the sense is "man and woman", or "husband and wife"... Similarly, the old alternation between kweno (woman) and kwe:niz (wife), from which we get 'quean' (whore)...
by Salmoneus
07 Dec 2018 21:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lapdeutsch
Replies: 45
Views: 17223

Re: Lapdeutsch

Well, old-fashioned English used -wife as a feminising suffix a lot. In particular, your use pairing -mann and -frou is mirrored in English: a man who works with or sells fish is a fishman (among other things), while a woman who works with or sells fish is a fishwife. Likewise aleman/alewife, oyster...
by Salmoneus
07 Dec 2018 01:14
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Not remotely.

It's not bizarre, it's very straightforward. I suggest considering the most likely meanings of each part of the word in turn...
by Salmoneus
06 Dec 2018 21:15
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

To recap... As to your other question: no, it's not a direct cognate to 'thirst'. However, part of the word does ultimately derive from the same PIE root as English 'thirst'. Is it a handkerchief? Ooh, very good guess! But no. Does it literally mean "nose dryer"? No. But you're certainly very much o...
by Salmoneus
05 Dec 2018 21:17
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6790
Views: 722768

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Depending on how "recently" you're looking for, there's open-syllable lengthening in Middle English, vowel length is allophonically determined by syllable structure in the modern North Germanic languages as well. I can only thing of English, though, as being a language where this vowel lengthening ...
by Salmoneus
05 Dec 2018 20:57
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14319
Views: 1081377

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Hmm, interesting, but I'm not sure if I personally believe that's more than a coincidence, since I can't find any reasoning behind it Well, it would make sense - a large number of ergative languages derive their "verbs" from noun-like forms, and languages tend to want to put all the arguments of a ...
by Salmoneus
05 Dec 2018 03:04
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14319
Views: 1081377

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Prestopping of resonants is my favourite phonetic feature ATM. What languages have them? In which contexts they have appeared diachronically? Hiw has a prestopped velar lateral from Proto-Oceanic *r. Is that an unconditioned change? I am not sure. You can read about it on Francois' website, here . ...
by Salmoneus
05 Dec 2018 01:40
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lapdeutsch
Replies: 45
Views: 17223

Re: Lapdeutsch

Feminine Agent Nouns Suffixes [...] -er → -ster By far the most common way to form the feminine form from the suffix -er Bäcker → Bäckster (baker) Schreiver → Schreivster (writer) I think I heard of all of these in either German or Low German, except the -st- suffix. What was the inspiration? Engli...
by Salmoneus
04 Dec 2018 01:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Latverian- a Romani Marvel Fanlang
Replies: 6
Views: 293

Re: Latverian- a Romani Marvel Fanlang

? That's the "realistic" version of the history!?
by Salmoneus
30 Nov 2018 15:59
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Yes. (with the previous caveat regarding the unknowability/controversy of the exact form of the root. To explain further: like many roots, there's a consonant gradation in different forms, and there seems to be some disagreement over which grade was original in which word and when different analogie...
by Salmoneus
29 Nov 2018 00:00
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Yes.

(Probably. More or less. Wikipedia thinks so, but Orel apparently thinks the North Germanic reflex is actually from a very slightly different form from the same root.)
by Salmoneus
27 Nov 2018 21:37
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lapdeutsch
Replies: 45
Views: 17223

Re: Lapdeutsch

I have to admit that I don't like it. It makes it look like English to my mind. Curious - it's the exact opposite of English (in that English stressed the noun there, destressing and dramatically reducing the numeral - ainaz flaskaz aba > @flAsk@. And I don't think we have a similar category of cou...
by Salmoneus
27 Nov 2018 01:06
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Lapdeutsch
Replies: 45
Views: 17223

Re: Lapdeutsch

I have to admit that I don't like it. It makes it look like English to my mind. Curious - it's the exact opposite of English (in that English stressed the noun there, destressing and dramatically reducing the numeral - ainaz flaskaz aba > @flAsk@. And I don't think we have a similar category of cou...
by Salmoneus
27 Nov 2018 00:29
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

shimobaatar wrote:
26 Nov 2018 23:44
Since it's been established that:
Salmoneus wrote:
25 Nov 2018 16:37
spanick wrote:
25 Nov 2018 16:35
Does -sk descend from a PGmc suffix?
No.
Is <-k> all that remains of the original suffix?
Yes.
by Salmoneus
26 Nov 2018 22:57
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Are either of the morphemes which compose <throsk> at the PGmc level available here? https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Proto-Germanic_lemmas ...err, that's a list of lemmas, not a list of morphemes. Both morphemes are, yes, incorporated into at least one of those lemmas. It seems rather stran...
by Salmoneus
26 Nov 2018 20:46
Forum: Translations
Topic: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs
Replies: 1766
Views: 198715

Re: Guess the Word in Germanic Conlangs

Are either of the morphemes which compose <throsk> at the PGmc level available here? https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Proto-Germanic_lemmas ...err, that's a list of lemmas, not a list of morphemes. Both morphemes are, yes, incorporated into at least one of those lemmas. And since you're seem...