Search found 50 matches

by DrGeoffStandish
16 May 2015 18:49
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Early modern Swedish
Replies: 26
Views: 5751

Re: Early modern Swedish

Nyrén also writes that <hv> was still a distinct sound in pairs like hval-val, since this sound was described as something like /hw/, i reckon we can rule out that 18th century Swedish had the modern slightly rounded velar sj-sound, and that the "thin" sj-sound as in Finland swedish or Norweigan wa...
by DrGeoffStandish
03 May 2015 02:55
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

I actually think variant 4 looks good even at normal size on a computer screen. It may be tricky to distinguish from normal g, though. It's definitely the most appealing of these since (1) it's in the "upper storey", and (2) there's only one crossing of the naked g . (In 8 the upper storey hoop is ...
by DrGeoffStandish
01 May 2015 19:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

I'm not for breeding so nope. [cross] Of course, I assume here that the breeding process is already performed like with the dogs. And dogs weren't really domesticated, they domesticated themselves through natural selection. We simply let them in and in the end we had furry pals. Maybe one could sim...
by DrGeoffStandish
01 May 2015 19:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

And no need to enslave the squirrels to enjoy their presence. Keep visiting your pine paradise and look at them go! The pine paradise is just outside my window, in the background I see the Jamtish mountains (OldJam Jamtafjǫllin , ModSwe Jämtlandsfjällen ). I realize that the squirrels outside my wi...
by DrGeoffStandish
01 May 2015 14:36
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

My hand-written <g> pretty much has a macron connected to it with a stroke from not lifting the pen tho, as an ascender (double-story too). [>_<] Aren't you a bit too young for handwriting this stuff? BTW, speaking about pet peeves, there's a lot of squirrels outside that have woken up from the win...
by DrGeoffStandish
01 May 2015 14:21
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

More of an orthographic peeve, or coïncidence of orthographic history, but I hate how <ƀ đ> look so nice while <ǥ> is just awful, because you often need the three together, but because of <ǥ> alone I can't bring myself to do it and find another way to express, say, voiced fricatives. I have always ...
by DrGeoffStandish
26 Apr 2015 01:03
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 689
Views: 184847

Re: False cognates

13th century East Norwegian seems to have had þær, contrasting with West Norwegian þar. What this means for Jamtish I cannot say, but it doesn't strike me as an unreasonable feature. At least we must've had þarna rather than þærna since we today have " dan " coming from this. The only MJ form I've ...
by DrGeoffStandish
25 Apr 2015 15:29
Forum: In other languages
Topic: Íslenska
Replies: 7
Views: 66046

Re: Íslenska

Prinsessa wrote:Fyrirgefðu. Ég gleymdi einni leiðréttingu: en, ekki enn. Betri en aðrir.
Öruggt? Er það ekki tvö n?
by DrGeoffStandish
25 Apr 2015 15:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 689
Views: 184847

Re: False cognates

I think it is generally accepted that hjá is related to hjú , my guess is that the Nynorsk dictionary has just copied the definition from Bokmål hos . I haven't seen that etymology suggested elsewhere. I've noticed that the etymologies in that source are somewhat dubious when I've cross checked wit...
by DrGeoffStandish
23 Apr 2015 20:36
Forum: In other languages
Topic: Íslenska
Replies: 7
Views: 66046

Re: Íslenska

Prinsessa wrote:
DrGeoffStandish wrote:Réttið mín mistök, takk! Gerið svo vel að leiðrétta mistök mín.
DrGeoffStandish wrote:Trúa þau Þau halda að þau eru séu betur betri enn aðrir sænskar svíar.
[tick]
Mörg mistök þar. Takk fyrir leiðréttingunni!
by DrGeoffStandish
23 Apr 2015 20:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Unique and/or odd distinctions
Replies: 185
Views: 20762

Re: Unique and/or odd distinctions

In older Swedish one could say supa soppa ' sup soup' where supa meant that you take in fluid food with a spoon. Today supa is mainly slang for drinking alcohol, probably from the fact that strong alcoholic beverages once were often drunk with a spoon (drinking from the bottle or even a cup/glass/ta...
by DrGeoffStandish
22 Apr 2015 20:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 689
Views: 184847

Re: False cognates

hos < OEN hús 'house' So, how did hús begin to be used as a preposition? An Old Swedish (using Old Norse orthography) sentence like Barnit er í húsi Leifs 'The child is in Leif's house' must somehow have become evolved into Barn­it er hús Leifi 'The child is with Leif' Damn, how did it happen? A ke...
by DrGeoffStandish
22 Apr 2015 19:55
Forum: In other languages
Topic: Íslenska
Replies: 7
Views: 66046

Re: Íslenska

Réttið mín mistök, takk!
DesEsseintes wrote:Sænska er sætust, sérstaklega frá Lidingö. (< stafsetning?)
Stafsetningin er Lýðingarey (fsæ. Lydhingeø). Ég hata Lýðingarey. Trúa þau að þau eru betur enn aðrir sænskar. [}:(]
DesEsseintes wrote:Voða sæt eyja.
En lýðingareyingarnar eru ekki sætar til atburða.
by DrGeoffStandish
20 Apr 2015 20:48
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

It doesn't matter what sound native speakers of the other language in question think is closer. So it's mainly to show off to other Americans? "I've moved to New York now, Kentucky is history". I've actually found that in at least bisyllabic words, Americans tend to put the stress on the last sylla...
by DrGeoffStandish
20 Apr 2015 20:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Unique and/or odd distinctions
Replies: 185
Views: 20762

Re: Unique and/or odd distinctions

I find the Swedish distinction between "tårta" and "kaka" quite interesting. They are both usually translated as 'cake' but there are some subtle differences in meaning. To a swedde this is like reading I find the English distinction between "cake" and "cookie" quite interesting. They are both usua...
by DrGeoffStandish
19 Apr 2015 23:41
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: [WoTS] The Climate Thread
Replies: 24
Views: 3261

Re: [WoTS] The Climate Thread

The best maps, in my opinion, aren't the ones that are the most scientifically accurate, but they're the ones that evoke your imagination. Well, the real world (though a con one, but you get my point) is waymore interesting than a complete phantasy. If you know the science holds your conworld will ...
by DrGeoffStandish
19 Apr 2015 23:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 58056

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

Isn't it a common tendency - at least in American English – to render /a/-ish vowels in foreign languages as /ɑ(ː)/? (Hence the common American pronunciation of pasta ...) Yeah, I'd agree. The first name of the Swedish golfer Annika Sörenstam is natively pronounced [ˈanː.ɪˌkʰa] but americans seem t...
by DrGeoffStandish
08 Apr 2015 00:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Orthographic quirks in natlangs
Replies: 127
Views: 17556

Re: Orthographic quirks in natlangs

Icelandic au umlauts with ey just like German au umlauts with äu , and just like Icelandic a~e and German a~ä . So it's there to show an older relationship, i-umlaut, than the much younger u-umlaut, which I think is fine. Your point is the usual, albeit naïve, one. This is my criticism of the pair ...
by DrGeoffStandish
05 Apr 2015 01:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Orthographic quirks in natlangs
Replies: 127
Views: 17556

Re: Orthographic quirks in natlangs

In Icelandic the diphthong au is annoyingly pronounced [œy̯] as if the spelling was öu . The spelling öu would be in line with the usual u -umlauted a , it's e.g. l ö nd u m rather than l a nd u m , i.e. ö~u is preferred over a~u . Spelling au instead of öu is like spelling landum instead of löndum ...
by DrGeoffStandish
02 Apr 2015 20:25
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Climates in Conworlds?
Replies: 6
Views: 2423

Re: Climates in Conworlds?

Anyone have any advice? Not exactly an advice but let's present some possibilities. As you may know, the Earth's temperature oscillates gicing rise to cold periods (like now) and warm periods (like most of the inhabitated Earth's history). Indeed, for a brief period the Earth was essentially a snow...