Search found 117 matches

by Ser
17 Jan 2020 23:46
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Today I learned ...
Replies: 50
Views: 51290

Re: Today I learned ...

I was thinking about my recent mention of French la foire , a vulgar word for 'diarrhea' (another such word is la chiasse ), when I realized that Salvadoran Spanish also has a couple vulgar words for "diarrhea": la churria and la churrutaca (which I imagine are partly chosen for their sound symbolis...
by Ser
17 Jan 2020 08:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Okay thank you ,I understand better now. But .... I guess what I dont get is why, if /yomi te/ > /yonde/, why are there still instances of /mp nt ns ŋk/ in modern Japanese? Are they all known to be transparent modern compounds in which the old rules were simply not applied? Or is there a reason to ...
by Ser
17 Jan 2020 06:16
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)
Replies: 15
Views: 256

Re: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)

Sorry, I meant midnight (0000) PST the night of Sunday 19/Monday 20. Ah, okay, so: PST (Los Angeles): 12:00 a.m. (midnight), Monday 20 CST (Chicago, Dallas): 2:00 a.m., Monday 20 EST (New York): 3:00 a.m., Monday 20 GMT (London): 8:00 a.m., Monday 20 CET (Berlin, Paris): 9:00 a.m., Monday 20 JST (T...
by Ser
17 Jan 2020 06:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)
Replies: 15
Views: 256

Re: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)

1200 PST? That's noon of Sunday the 19th in PST, right? So, I guess that's about 63 hours. Final time in various timezones: PST (Los Angeles): 12:00 p.m. (noon), Sunday 19 CST (Chicago, Dallas): 2:00 p.m., Sunday 19 EST (New York): 3:00 p.m., Sunday 19 GMT (London): 8:00 p.m., Sunday 19 CET (Berlin,...
by Ser
17 Jan 2020 05:41
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But where do /mb/ & /nd/ (and maybe /ŋg/ too?) come from then? [...] i guess a weak spot in my theory is that modern Japanese also has /mp nt/ alongside /mb nd/, and i have no idea where those clusters come from, unless it can be shown that they are all transparent compounds. I think I'm confusing ...
by Ser
17 Jan 2020 03:13
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

i think you (and they) might be mixing 2 different instances of the same shift. Jp had the unknown rendaku-like shift way back when and then a second one in recorded times that we're absolutely sure of. thats why you can have clusters like /mb/ , /nd/, etc where one would expect to only see /mp nt/...
by Ser
16 Jan 2020 23:49
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Cross-posted from the ZBB Does anyone have a reference to the assumed order of sound changes from Old Japanese to current times? If not, OJ to any later stage of would be extremely helpful, as long as they have at least a general idea of when the changes occurred. I've found a few mentions of when ...
by Ser
16 Jan 2020 23:13
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Today I learned ...
Replies: 50
Views: 51290

Re: Today I learned ...

Even though I have a master's degree in French, I shamefully transmit what I read on another forum rather than what I learned in my studies here: apparently increased, although not obligatory use of subject pronouns in Old French precedes the erosion of personal endings. So there might have been Ge...
by Ser
14 Jan 2020 10:09
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5934
Views: 1402352

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I just read that essay by Borges where he mentions a hilarious "Chinese" (read: exotic) classification of animals with 14 weird main categories like "those belonging to the Emperor", "embalmed ones", "stray dogs" and "those that tremble like mad". I had heard about this essay many times, and only be...
by Ser
14 Jan 2020 04:02
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)
Replies: 15
Views: 256

Re: Speedlang IX (Jan 17-19)

I'd like to participate, but I'll just warn you that I'm thinking of doing something weird and non-naturalistic (while following the constraints you specify, of course).
by Ser
07 Jan 2020 07:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Are we sure about amidos ? Its got two irregular shifts, plus it ends in -os even though the others seem to all end in -o. Amidos is less surprising than it seems at first. The expected inherited form of Lat. invītus in Old Spanish would be *embidos (also hypothetically spelled *enbidos, *envidos)....
by Ser
06 Jan 2020 21:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

A month ago, I read Steven Dworkin's A Guide to Old Spanish (2018). I didn't find much that was new for me in terms of morphosyntax, although this was the first time I read that some scholars say that 13th century prose, like that of the General Estoria ("General History"), had a particularly high p...
by Ser
02 Jan 2020 00:27
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?
Replies: 10
Views: 217

Re: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?

Wow! What's the logic behind calling the determiner the head? It's mainly an attempt to achieve a parallel analysis between traditional NPs on the one hand (where the head is traditionally a content word and determiners, which are function words, are dependents) and VPs, PPs and CPs on the other ha...
by Ser
01 Jan 2020 22:46
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?
Replies: 10
Views: 217

Re: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?

Khemehekis wrote:
01 Jan 2020 22:39
Isn't English head-final in determiner + noun word order? On his farm he had some pigs, not *pigs some.
Eh, it is the fashion in current syntax to say the determiner is the head in English. Personally I see some merit to either analysis.
by Ser
01 Jan 2020 22:22
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?
Replies: 10
Views: 217

Re: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?

Another thing I'd like to mention is that languages are often inconsistent on whether they're head-initial or head-final. For example, let's look at English and Classical Latin and compare them. English: - head-final in adjective + noun word order - head-final in adverb + adjective word order - head...
by Ser
01 Jan 2020 22:07
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?
Replies: 10
Views: 217

Re: How exactly do Head-Initial Compounding work?

1. Head-Initial languages. I get that adjectives comes after the noun. Sort off like they do in English pronouns (I want SOMEONE NICE). BUT, what about compound nouns? Because I assumed they worked they same as in English, that is, a SCHOOL BOY is a kind of boy, and not a kind of school. But the mo...
by Ser
31 Dec 2019 21:12
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4444
Views: 931119

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

On the contrary, "bimonthly" isn't very ambiguous at all because "bi-" means "two" and "monthly" means "every month." Thus, we get "very two/other month(s)" for "bimonthly." If we want "every other week" to be concise, we say "biweekly." "Twice a month" is exactly what it says on the tin. British, ...
by Ser
26 Dec 2019 01:17
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5934
Views: 1402352

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

[...] [...] I'd say that /kr gr/ are likely to become /ʀ̥ ʀ/ if /pr br/ become /ʙ̥ ʙ/. However, you can then have /ʀ̥ ʀ/ > /χ ʁ/ > /x ɣ/ unconditionally without affecting /ʙ̥ ʙ/. Regarding linguistic bilabial trills, here is an interesting post from someone on the ZBB: I will say that I do not beli...
by Ser
25 Dec 2019 23:41
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Sixth Conversation Thread
Replies: 64
Views: 8374

Re: The Sixth Conversation Thread

مرگ بر برف
marg bar barf
DOWN WITH SNOW

There has been zero snow here in Vancouver so far, and I'm more than happy with this.
by Ser
25 Dec 2019 12:20
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Sixth Conversation Thread
Replies: 64
Views: 8374

Re: The Sixth Conversation Thread

There is quite a bit of variety in terms of the possible physical states of matter, but more than half of them require extreme cold or heat and/or extreme pressure. In everyday Earth conditions however, four basic or classical types can be identified: * solid ("earth") * liquid ("water") * gas ("air...