Search found 205 matches

by HinGambleGoth
31 May 2017 20:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4376
Views: 887970

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

qwed117 wrote: In that case, I think most Indo-European languages do.
Afrikaans lost practically all strong verbs but the copula and it has also lost person and number marking.
by HinGambleGoth
29 May 2017 18:03
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4376
Views: 887970

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:I find this interesting in that "natlang" and "conlang" always seemed so black and white to me, but I can see how there can be blurred lines.
You could argue, that some highly presciptive standard languages have shades of that, like standard German.
by HinGambleGoth
25 May 2017 21:44
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: [j] vs [i̯]
Replies: 17
Views: 4359

Re: [j] vs [i̯]

I think one indicator of /ʋ~v/ being an approximant in German is the way Germans tend to mispronounce /w/ in English, lumping it together with /v/ When I think about it, my own /v/ is not even articulated in the same way as my /f/. The lips are more open and there is far less turbulence. And native...
by HinGambleGoth
21 May 2017 12:55
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: [j] vs [i̯]
Replies: 17
Views: 4359

Re: [j] vs [i̯]

I would guess it exists somewhere. Spanish has something that comes close, /ʝ/ vs. /i̯/. There is some neutralization and interchange between the sounds; for example, the singular "rey" has /i̯/ while the plural "reyes" has /ʝ/. They are only constrastive in most varieties after other consonants, i...
by HinGambleGoth
19 May 2017 22:25
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Early old norse.
Replies: 123
Views: 31169

Re: Early old norse.

Regarding the word hross, it actually shifted around the vowel and consonant in Old Swedish, much like English, yielding hors. I do not know if it is attested in danish though, and it is possible that both variants coexisted, russ is also found in Swedish.
by HinGambleGoth
10 May 2017 20:50
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Samthüdisk, a slightly different Germanic auxlang.
Replies: 2
Views: 924

Re: Samthüdisk, a slightly different Germanic auxlang.

Nachtuil wrote:For pronouns have you considered using your demonstratives/definitely articles like Dutch often does for inanimates? (And sometimes animates)
That would be much alike north germanic that uses the demonstratives as plural pronouns.
by HinGambleGoth
05 May 2017 18:55
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Samthüdisk, a slightly different Germanic auxlang.
Replies: 2
Views: 924

Samthüdisk, a slightly different Germanic auxlang.

Well, I already know of Folkspraak, Frenkish and such, but I want to try and make a somewhat different Germanic auxlang. The existing languages feel somewhat mangled together, often English grammar with a dutch like orthography and a radically generalized morphology that doesn't really resemble a li...
by HinGambleGoth
30 Mar 2017 16:09
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Phonological history of Swedish
Replies: 1
Views: 2407

Re: Phonological history of Swedish

This is the development of the Swedish vowel system, roughly from 1300 to 1500, some mergers started later and are still ongoing in the dialects, standard Swedish merged /ɞ:/ and /o:/ centuries ago and it is mostly found in western Sweden today. Otherwise, the vowel system has remained remarkably st...
by HinGambleGoth
10 Jan 2017 14:03
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 345
Views: 145803

Re: English Orthography Reform

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fj4w6SCn2ZM

How would a dialect like that be dealt with?
by HinGambleGoth
04 Jan 2017 17:00
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: If natlangs were conlangs
Replies: 97
Views: 53366

Re: If natlangs were conlangs

tseren wrote:Some people just don't know when to stop. They pretended people spoke this stuff.
Goidelic is terrifying.
by HinGambleGoth
27 Dec 2016 13:44
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Early old norse.
Replies: 123
Views: 31169

Re: Early old norse.

Is it known when this r > ʀ / i_# change occurred? In the late Viking age, when z* and r* where falling together and the carvers had a harder time separating the sounds. Another thing I have been thinking about is the actual name of the language, the medieval scandinavian spoke essentialy the same ...
by HinGambleGoth
23 Dec 2016 20:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: If natlangs were conlangs
Replies: 97
Views: 53366

Re: If natlangs were conlangs

Danish is an attempt at making a Germanic conlang where the creator experimented with all sorts of lenition, you can tell since the vowel system is quite generic and not as planned out. The grammar is also very generic, and very average. As I said the maker just made a one-of trowaway experiment whe...
by HinGambleGoth
23 Dec 2016 16:18
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4376
Views: 887970

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I have some questions about the Middle low German spelling. onset /f/ is spelled with <v>, I know that dutch and German voiced /s/ to /z/ in this position, so maybe f also was voiced. Dutch spells Germanic f as <v> Danish scribes clearly spelled /v/ with <f> between vowels, but Swedish scribes didn'...
by HinGambleGoth
22 Dec 2016 15:51
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 56849

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

But Standard German is an artificial language based on a written compromise of different High German dialects which over time became more and more of a spoken language whose phonology is based on both the written standard and spoken Eastphalian Low German. This is very interesting, it has bothered ...
by HinGambleGoth
20 Dec 2016 10:39
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 56849

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

Oh, well that's different. I was thinking about the reconstructed phonologies of languages like Latin and Sanskrit. Well they are related issues. For instance whenever early modern english is brought up people say "sounds irish, sheakespeare was english" and so on, as if RP is eternal, this also ap...
by HinGambleGoth
20 Dec 2016 00:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 56849

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

How do we know how accurate our current reconstructions are without going back in time and hearing the language? But our language never changed, only our neighbours who corrupted our language with foregin intermingling and lazy pronounciation! They used to talk so you could understand, like us! Thi...
by HinGambleGoth
19 Dec 2016 20:30
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Linguistic pet peeves
Replies: 338
Views: 56849

Re: Linguistic pet peeves

One thing that I cant stand is that you simply can not bring up historical linguistics without encountering strong skepticism or downright hostility (often from native speakers of the modern language/dialect) when you talk about how languages such as Latin or early modern english can fairly accuratl...
by HinGambleGoth
12 Dec 2016 10:00
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Merger of mutually intelligible languages
Replies: 21
Views: 7083

Re: Merger of mutually intelligible languages

*The Scandinavian languages (Danish, Swedish and Norwegian) You could easily create an inbetween-language, blending bokmål and riksvenska, it would turn be something akin to götamål dialects. But danish? Written language maybe, see dano-norwergian. Spoken? No, danish has a vastly different phonolog...
by HinGambleGoth
25 Nov 2016 23:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Devoicing in English
Replies: 15
Views: 2536

Re: Devoicing in English

Voicing of stops in germanic is a whole topic of it's own, isn't the actual distinction in obstruents mostly the lack or prescence of aspiration? Or fortis/lenis? Icelandic, Danish and Swiss german are for example analyzed that way.
by HinGambleGoth
25 Nov 2016 21:00
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: "General West Germanic"
Replies: 8
Views: 2002

Re: "General West Germanic"

I have been thinking about a deep french-like orthography for the medieval germanic languages, you could fairly easily spell old norse and anglo-saxon in an archaic state like proto-norse. Umlaut and other sound changes would be predictavle through pronounciation rules. So dōmjan would be read as /d...