Search found 91 matches

by Zekoslav
20 Feb 2019 11:05
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Proto-Indo-European Declension/genders
Replies: 9
Views: 153

Re: Proto-Indo-European Declension/genders

Once again, I'd like to note that the attested languages have mostly done away with root ablaut in noun and adjective declension, so with the exception of some consonant stems it's reconstructed solely by internal reconstruction. For realism's sake, i- and u-stems (with the exception of some neuters...
by Zekoslav
20 Feb 2019 10:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14460
Views: 1175643

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Apparently ( here's the paper), the change mn > mpn in Medieval Latin and some other languages happened because the surrounding consonants produced a bilabial click. The conclusion is that any combination of stops (nasal or oral) where the first is more front than the second can produce an excrescen...
by Zekoslav
19 Feb 2019 11:12
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14460
Views: 1175643

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Note that most of these languages, with the exception of Armenian, completely demolished the inherited PIE. declension: getting rid of genders without doing so would be difficult unless you model your sound changes precisely to merge the relevant endings.
by Zekoslav
19 Feb 2019 11:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 159

Re: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin

Yes, I know substrates are considered a sort of deus-ex-machina nowadays, but the changes French and Welsh went through are remarkably similar...
by Zekoslav
19 Feb 2019 11:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Proto-Indo-European Declension/genders
Replies: 9
Views: 153

Re: Proto-Indo-European Declension/genders

It's really only the so-called "thematic declension", i.e. o-stems for masculine/neuter and ā-stems for feminine (plus the less productive ī-stems, as mentioned by KaiTheHomoSapien) which distinguishes all three genders: in other declensions, masculine and feminine have the same endings. Now, some l...
by Zekoslav
19 Feb 2019 10:41
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 159

Re: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin

I've got the impression that Western or Gallo-romance features started to spread earlier than the period of Frankish rule. Already during the late Empire, with the weakening of Rome, there was an important trade route on from Lugdunum to Mediolanum to Sirmium, by which Gallo-romance features could s...
by Zekoslav
17 Feb 2019 11:11
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 159

Re: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin

Yes, Appendix Probi has some nice examples of hypercorrection, e.g. occasio non occansio.
by Zekoslav
16 Feb 2019 11:50
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 159

Re: Regional Differences in Vulgar Latin

Inscriptions (that is, spelling mistakes in inscriptions) are our best source of Roman era Vulgar Latin, and they show reality was more complicated than it's usually thought: sometimes spelling mistakes in a particular area don't really correspond to the earliest development of the local Romance lan...
by Zekoslav
11 Feb 2019 16:59
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5119
Views: 601463

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

/m n ŋ/
/p t t͡s k/
/f s χ*/
/r/
/i e ɛ a ɔ o u/

*voiceless uvular fricative, i.e. Greek Chi

(C)V(C), with geminates, nasal + stop clusters, /tk/ and /sχ/ at the least (exact phonotactics are as of yet undecided - I might go for an Algonquian-like distribution).
by Zekoslav
03 Feb 2019 09:31
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 1661
Views: 324810

Re: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Thank you for this information. I've never had a proper map of the whole planet, since the continent was slowly developed bottom-up, region by region - I guess I should first make such a map and then reinterpret the climate. The thing about subarctic rainforests is extremely interesting (I could use...
by Zekoslav
02 Feb 2019 19:17
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 1661
Views: 324810

Re: (C&C) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, while browsing The Other Board , I've stumbled upon an interesting observation concerning climate: that Geoff's climate cookbook (the usual beginner's resource) is not quite accurate when things deviate too much from Earth, especially when there are east-to-west coastlines in the wrong place . I...
by Zekoslav
31 Jan 2019 16:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14460
Views: 1175643

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

This is probably due to my native language instinct, and the fact that you used the verb "to give" as an example: if the oblique argument is a receiver, I have a hunch it's more likely to be animate, ergo less likely to be a patient. However, languages which work the way you intended do exist, and t...
by Zekoslav
22 Jan 2019 15:30
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14460
Views: 1175643

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In pitch accent laguages, are accented vowels less likely to be reduced, like in stress accent languages, or are they usually pronounced just like an un-accented vowel but with a different pitch? I'm not entirely sure, but I think in the Turkic languages with pitch accent there tends to be some kin...
by Zekoslav
16 Jan 2019 21:40
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: How would one go about making a Slavic language?
Replies: 2
Views: 417

Re: How would one go about making a Slavic language?

Well, I learned most of what I know about Slavic linguistic history by reading local (i.e. not in English) literature, so I don't know much about sources, however... 1. There's this book which contains a chapter on Slavic, and other IE. studies manuals may as well. 2. There's an excellent historical...
by Zekoslav
16 Jan 2019 21:13
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6831
Views: 790933

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

PIE. *tw > Ancient Greek /s/, German /tw/ (post-High-German-consonant shift, e.g. dwarf ~ Zwerg) > /tsw/ make it look like it can cause assibilation.
by Zekoslav
02 Jan 2019 11:04
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Dialects
Replies: 62
Views: 20299

Re: English Dialects

Another foreign pronunciation of English [:D] : KIT i̞ DRESS ɛ TRAP a ~ æ LOT ɔ STRUT ɐ FOOT ʊ (yes, for some reason, my FOOT vowel is more lax than my KIT vowel) BATH ɑː CLOTH ɔ NURSE ɚː FLEECE iː FACE ei̯ PALM ɑː GOAT ou̯ GOOSE uː PRICE ai̯ CHOICE oi̯ MOUTH ɑu̯ NEAR iːɚ̯ SQUARE eːɚ̯ START ɑːɻ NORT...
by Zekoslav
31 Dec 2018 11:23
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6831
Views: 790933

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In the oldest Western South Slavic documents written in the Latin alphabet (based on Italian and Old High German), schwa is represented variably as <e> or <i>, while <a> is never used. I'm not sure how this relates to the eventual decision to use <e> in most European languages - maybe schwa really w...
by Zekoslav
31 Dec 2018 11:18
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14460
Views: 1175643

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

It depends on the language. For example, in my dialect of Croatian, accented vowels are slightly longer than unaccented ones even though the accent is otherwise purely pitch and no stress (this has been checked by phonetic analysis), while in Japanese both accented and unaccented vowels are the same...
by Zekoslav
20 Dec 2018 14:23
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6831
Views: 790933

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

There's a well-described Oceanic language, Mwotlap, which fit's the requirement of having underlying representations very different from their surface realizations (it's strictly CVC), having lots of interesting morphonology in the process.

It's full description, is, however, in French only.
by Zekoslav
29 Nov 2018 18:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6831
Views: 790933

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Oh, interesting, I thought that the voiceless aspirated stops were a development specific to Indo-Aryan. Well, there's two possible scenarios for the Iranian development, as I alluded to in my post. Indo-Aryan voiceless aspirates correspond to Iranian voiceless fricatives, and both develop from clu...