Search found 173 matches

by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 22:56
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Implosive consonants
Replies: 10
Views: 3519

Re: Implosive consonants

So basically implosives are the counterpart of ejectives rather than explosives?
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 19:11
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Collaborative Germanic Auxlang
Replies: 134
Views: 8364

Re: Collaborative Germanic Auxlang

Also, since all Germanic languages use some word to mark their infinitive, I think having 'ad' would be okay. German doesn't do this. In German the Infinitive is marked by the suffix -en or sometimes only -n . :eng: to run = :deu: lauf en :eng: to be = :deu: sei n :eng: to be or not to be = :deu: s...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 17:58
Forum: Translations
Topic: In heaven everything is fine
Replies: 28
Views: 2761

Re: In heaven everything is fine

German alternative:

:deu: Im Himmel ist alles in Ordnung.
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 17:44
Forum: Translations
Topic: I got more invitations than I knew what to do with.
Replies: 15
Views: 2833

Re: I got more invitations than I knew what to do with.

Natlangs: :deu: Ich habe vieler Invitationen bekommt als ich weiß was zu tun mit. (not sure if the sentence is grammatic) There are several things wrong with it. Correct: :deu: Ich habe mehr Einladungen bekommen, als ich gebrauchen kann. Alternative: :deu: Ich habe mehr Einladungen bekommen, als da...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 17:26
Forum: Translations
Topic: Double rainbow
Replies: 18
Views: 3285

Re: Double rainbow

:deu: Doppelt Regenbogen, ach mein Gott! Doppelt Regenbogen die ganzen Weg über dem Himmel! Was bedeutet es? That is incorrect. Correct German: :deu: Ein doppelter Regenbogen, oh mein Gott! Ein doppelter Regenbogen, quer über den ganzen Himmel! Was bedeutet das bloß? Alternative: :deu: Ein Doppelre...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 16:36
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: How is your nick pronounced?
Replies: 301
Views: 33716

Re: How is your nick pronounced?

Most people expect it to be ['tʃæn.dɪθ], but it is in fact: ['χɑ̃.dɪtʰ].
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 16:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Hated Phonemes!
Replies: 92
Views: 8714

Re: Hated Phonemes!

Also, I don't understand why so many people like it that much. It's harsh, yet inviting. You know how it feels to come home really tired in the dead of winter and just collapse in bed, your face pressed against the cold pillow, too exhausted to let it bother you? That's /C/. I don't know, every wor...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 15:58
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Favorite Phoneme!
Replies: 421
Views: 37747

Re: Favorite Phoneme!

I myself can easily distinguish [ʀ] from [ʁ] I can pronounce the fricative, but I just can't make a trill... :cry: I am German and it's the same with me. I can easily pronounce the fricative (which in German is more of an approximant anyway, and I'm not talking about the allophone [ɐ] after vowels)...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 14:34
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Hated Phonemes!
Replies: 92
Views: 8714

Re: Hated Phonemes!

Another thing I'm not a fan of is /x/ in a word-final position, as in loch and Bach . Yes I know it's used extensively in Polish. :roll: Well the question is, do you not like it generally, or only when conlanging? As stated, German has word-final /x/, and I have nothing against it. In fact, I reall...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 14:09
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: "Hard" and "soft" consonants -- what's the difference?
Replies: 7
Views: 2938

Re: "Hard" and "soft" consonants -- what's the difference?

This actually seems to be quite a common question, and, from what I can tell, for good reason. Now, in a broad sense these two sounds are both post-alveolar. The first, /ɕ/, is a laminal palatalised postalveolar while the second, /ʃ/, is a domed (i.e. weakly palatalised) apical postalveolar. Isn't ...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 13:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Favorite Phoneme!
Replies: 421
Views: 37747

Re: Favorite Phoneme!

Well, that one is not really common in Germany. [ʁ] is the most common, followed by [r]. Maybe. I often get confused between [ʁ] and [ʀ]. [ʁ] is a fricative and [ʀ] is a trill, but I have trouble distinguishing them too. That maybe due to the fact, that very often [ʁ] is misleadingly taught as /ʀ/ ...
by Chandith
29 Sep 2010 13:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Hated Phonemes!
Replies: 92
Views: 8714

Re: Hated Phonemes!

I'm not a big fan of /ç/. Me neither. Also, I don't understand why so many people like it that much. It reminds me of the soft sound of wind passing through narrow spaces. I have always found it very soothing. There isn't really any phoneme I HATE, but I am not very fond of nasal vowels, [ɹ] and fo...
by Chandith
27 Sep 2010 15:32
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Favorite Phoneme!
Replies: 421
Views: 37747

Re: Favorite Phoneme!

Maximillian wrote:My favourite would be [ʀ], like in German. ^_^
Well, that one is not really common in Germany. [ʁ] is the most common, followed by [r].

My favorites are: [ç], [ʁ] and [ɾ].