Search found 63 matches

by Ser
21 Sep 2019 18:12
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5686
Views: 1333475

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

That said, the kind of irregular reduction of common morphemes that brblues is asking about does happen now and then. The expected outcome of the Spanish 2PL verbal ending would be -ades. This is what Old Spanish had (cantātis > cantades), but then it was irregularly reduced to modern -áis (vos(otro...
by Ser
21 Sep 2019 02:15
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4372
Views: 887280

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

It seems that word order encodes which participant is the topic in all languages (?), while there must be some morphological marker for semantic roles (voice or case). Do languages that have morphological marker for topic but code semantic roles with word order exist? X-top V Y. 'X is Ving Y.' X V ...
by Ser
20 Sep 2019 07:38
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: On making a conscript that doesn't suck.
Replies: 7
Views: 19741

Re: On making a conscript that doesn't suck.

I thought this was clawgrip's guide to making scripts, but then I noticed it's not.

What used to be here before?
by Ser
15 Sep 2019 06:11
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4372
Views: 887280

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

It is positively archaic in modern Italian. Italian Wiktionary says it fell into disuse in 19th century.
by Ser
15 Sep 2019 03:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: The alphabet has a secret and has been found
Replies: 44
Views: 737

Re: The alphabet has a secret and has been found

Since the orthography was partially influenced by that of Latin, [θ] appearing in third person singular endings, which derives from Latin /t/, could be written as <t>, unless the word's Latin etymon was no longer recognisable: for example, [aθ] 'have-3.sg.pres' is usually written as <ad> and not <a...
by Ser
01 Sep 2019 21:43
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 2780
Views: 677157

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Am asking, how does someone distinguish this? /a ä ɑ/ When speaking, you put your tongue in different positions when pronouncing each of the three. When listening, some part of your brain interprets the signals and identifies their acoustic differences to distinguish them. This looks like a facetio...
by Ser
30 Aug 2019 00:01
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Compound generator thread
Replies: 15
Views: 1392

Re: Compound generator thread

You're talking about γαλεός , ¿? I think he is, although Beekes prefers to link it to γαλέη 'weasel', yeah. But I'm not 100% sure about the spilled breastmilk myth. Κύκλος Γαλαξίας. Οὕτος γίνεται ἐν τοῖς φαινομένοις κύκλοις, ὃν προσαγορεύεσθαί φασι γαλαξίαν· οὐ γὰρ ἐξῆν τοῖς Διὸς υἱοῖς τῆς οὐρανίου...
by Ser
29 Aug 2019 03:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4372
Views: 887280

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Also, liquids often have voiceless allophones. English /l/ and /ɹ/ become unvoiced after /p t k/. Many dialects of Spanish have [tɾ̥] (voiceless tap) for /tɾ/ (the man who runs the one Spanish radio program here in Vancouver even has [ʈʂ], and he comes from Concepción, Chile). Parisian French has [ʀ...
by Ser
29 Aug 2019 02:29
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Different Way of Doing Adpositions - help request
Replies: 24
Views: 3641

Re: Different Way of Doing Adpositions - help request

This is fine if it's about the writing system, but these interpretations have different pronunciations. Adverbs are more strongly stressed. In phrasal verbs too? How do you define the term "phrasal verb"? Different authors use very different definitions. At one extreme, some authors say that any ve...
by Ser
26 Aug 2019 18:42
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Suffix -age in English
Replies: 5
Views: 733

Re: Suffix -age in English

The unstated followup question is “why not”? To the extent that you don't mind novel words, especially as a joke, I don't see why not either. You could use -age on a word on the left to form its mate on the right, using some semantic change typical of the suffix or other. Typical semantic changes o...
by Ser
26 Aug 2019 08:47
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Different Way of Doing Adpositions - help request
Replies: 24
Views: 3641

Re: Different Way of Doing Adpositions - help request

Differentiating between adpositions and adverbs in modern Germanic langs is even harder than in Finnish. (3) I [went in] the house. or (4) I went [in the house]. This is fine if it's about the writing system, but these interpretations have different pronunciations. Adverbs are more strongly stressed.
by Ser
26 Aug 2019 07:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Suffix -age in English
Replies: 5
Views: 733

Re: Suffix -age in English

The answer is very obviously no. I don't understand the point of this thread.
by Ser
25 Aug 2019 18:46
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Compound generator thread
Replies: 15
Views: 1392

Re: Compound generator thread

Galaxy: star-hive, star-sea. Actually attested: Mandarin 恆星系 héngxīng-xì fixed.star-system, typically abbreviated to -星系 -xīng-xì star-system when it is itself part of a compound (e.g. 仙女星系 xiān-nǚ-xīngxì immortal-woman-galaxy 'Andromeda'). 恆星 heńg-xīng 'fixed star' is itself literally constant-star...
by Ser
25 Aug 2019 15:53
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5686
Views: 1333475

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Anyone know a good/reliable resource for finding the 1000/1500/2000 most common words in Modern Standard Arabic? I don't, and it wouldn't surprise me if it turns out it doesn't exist. However, I'd say you could have a look at these vocabulary lists of common Standard Arabic words just as well (not ...
by Ser
18 Aug 2019 21:51
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5686
Views: 1333475

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

How are prenasalized consonants treated in between vowels? Are they considered separate or the same. For example, let's say you have /kamba/, would it be /ka.mba/ or /kam.ba/? I know that prenasalized consonants are treated as one phoneme at the beginning of the word instead of a syllabic nasal fol...
by Ser
31 Jul 2019 23:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 16
Views: 3966

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

One thing I notice about Semitic languages is that they don't seem to have a lot of homorganic nasal+stop clusters. /mb mp nt nd/ etc. A lot of such clusters in Romance and by extension the latinate vocab of English come from attaching the prefix in- 'inside, into' ("impose") or 'not' ("impossible"...
by Ser
29 Jul 2019 22:21
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 16
Views: 3966

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

A couple fun things on word length: Xhosa has a strict rule that all content words (nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs) must be at least two syllables long. In the situations where a verb in the singular imperative could end up with only one syllable, an extra meaningless yi- prefix is added so that ...
by Ser
29 Jul 2019 22:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 16
Views: 3966

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Standard Arabic with ʔiʕraab (that is, classical morphology) has an extremely strict CV(C) syllable structure, and goes to great lengths to enforce it and prevent three-consonant clusters, with many rules for epenthetic vowels. The inserted vowel is usually a short i, but sometimes it's a short a or...
by Ser
29 Jul 2019 19:25
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 4372
Views: 887280

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Thanks for the long reply, I'll read it more carefully later. By the way, while writing this other post , it occurred to me that all the correlative pronouns for motion-towards look like ablatives. Does anyone know how that came about? Are these, somehow, maybe remnants of the Indo-European instrume...
by Ser
29 Jul 2019 19:08
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 5686
Views: 1333475

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Concerning that case-preserving Romance language I imagined earlier , a major weak point in Latin case system is that almost all prepositions go with the accusative and the ablative... which merge due to sound changes. So, the nominative would be used for subjects, the genitive for possessors, the ...