The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

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elemtilas
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » 14 Jan 2019 05:46

Firebird766 wrote:
12 Jan 2019 21:09
Most pets in Essu Beti are working animals. Cats are there to keep the introduced rodent population down. Dogs are there to guard the flock and bark up a storm if a crocodile appears (or, in Kalmalu village, if anyone gets vaguely near Sambir’s house). Chickens, pigs, and other livestock are just there to be eaten. Occasionally someone might adopt a frog or gecko or avialan, but as a rule that’s only for small, easy to feed animals. There is very, very little food to spare for non-productive animals, and someone trying to keep an animal that doesn’t work and isn’t very cheap to feed will be looked down on for wasting resources.

You can still keep a working animal as a companion. They just need to earn their keep.
Reasonable. What's an avialan?

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Firebird766 » 14 Jan 2019 06:19

elemtilas wrote:
14 Jan 2019 05:46
Reasonable. What's an avialan?
These: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avialae

Here’s a picture of a typical example:
Spoiler:
Image
Common throughout the Oyekan Archipelago, which Essu Beti is a part of, and northern Creatan, these bird cousins have thrived even as they went extinct in the rest of the world. The ones in Essu Beti are not used to human or elven contact, but have grown wary to large animals in general thanks to the large crocodile population on the island. Most of the ones on Essu Beti can fly, also thanks to the large crocodile population, but there are several flightless species living in the less swampy areas.

I like putting long-extinct animals into this world, ok? I also have nimravids in Eimari and various countries in northern Sorkid, thylacoleo in the rest of Sorkid, cyonasua in Creatan, and trilobites in the oceans.

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » 14 Jan 2019 14:25

Firebird766 wrote:
14 Jan 2019 06:19
Common throughout the Oyekan Archipelago, which Essu Beti is a part of, and northern Creatan, these bird cousins have thrived even as they went extinct in the rest of the world. The ones in Essu Beti are not used to human or elven contact, but have grown wary to large animals in general thanks to the large crocodile population on the island. Most of the ones on Essu Beti can fly, also thanks to the large crocodile population, but there are several flightless species living in the less swampy areas.

I like putting long-extinct animals into this world, ok? I also have nimravids in Eimari and various countries in northern Sorkid, thylacoleo in the rest of Sorkid, cyonasua in Creatan, and trilobites in the oceans.
No worries there!
Spoiler:
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Reyzadren » 16 Jan 2019 12:43

Firebird766 wrote:
12 Jan 2019 21:09
Next: What is the most popular media in your conculture? Why?
Of course, it's social media on the natural internet. While papers and boards are used almost everywhere, such interactivity service is provided in hubs even in small villages for those who lack access.

Next question: Plants/crops that are grown but not for food in your conworld?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Nortaneous » 21 Feb 2019 17:31

Reyzadren wrote:
16 Jan 2019 12:43
Next question: Plants/crops that are grown but not for food in your conworld?
There are two non-food cash crops whose common names come from Miar: zʷar, known as rviru ~ rviju in Enzielu and transmitted west through pre-Amqoli *zbirup (> Amqoli zberu) > Narngic *zɨbürüh > Vengic *zi.byur.yuh > Zzyxwqnp cuxyut and Hluic *dəpriś > thoepyues (although the Zzyxwqnp loan thuyu is also heard, especially in Bor Hlu), from which a sort of tea is made, and pkəʕnəl > kaedu, a stimulant which is fermented and taken as dip. West of the Zhjumna Mountains, its name is derived from pre-Amqoli *wəšru, transmitted west as usual via Narngic *wös(ru) - so Amqoli oshru, Hlu wuehl, and Zzyxwqnp wishv.

There's another plant that's processed into insect repellant, especially in Rau-speaking areas, where it's known as qutna. It's grown in Zzxzzyx as a decorative plant, for its bright purple berries, and known there as chqn (i.e. northern) gyxddvx.

Of course, since panspermia is partly true on account of an unfathomably ancient interstellar empire, these are (descendants of) yaupon, tobacco, and Callicarpa. But they don't know that.

Next question: what utensils, if any, do the people of your conculture use?

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by alynnidalar » 21 Feb 2019 21:43

That depends on where you are in Sanmra. While it might seem like an obvious answer, enclaves in North America largely use "Western" utensils (forks) while those in Asia eat with chopsticks. And everybody eats saiha, a type of flatbread, which gets pressed into service as a utensil as well. Most decent restaurants in larger cities will offer both forks/knives and chopsticks, regardless of which continent you're on, however, and there's no particular shame in using one or the other, except perhaps in some small enclaves.

There are a few outliers, though! For example, the small town of Mekeras, physically located in North America, has many ties to Asian enclaves, and it's most common there to eat with chopsticks, to the point that it's part of the town stereotype. And in the largest cities (Elten and Sakaran), people come from such a mix of backgrounds that it's no surprise for one family to use forks while the family next door uses chopsticks.

The reason both are possible options is that traditional dalar foods are things like noodles, soups, etc. that can be eaten pretty well either way.

Next question: What sort of companion animals/pets are popular in your world?

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Curlyjimsam » 22 Feb 2019 18:29

Many Viksorians, especially the richer sort, keep horses as pets. Dogs are popular, and there's a bit of a thing for domesticated foxes. There is an armadillo-like creature is kept as a pet commonly enough not to be thought of as unusual, though due to its size a big house or garden is usually required.

Smaller pets include rabbits and guinea pigs, which are also kept for food. Many families also keep chickens, ducks or pigeons, though the status of these as "pets" is dubious and they are primarily kept for meat and eggs. However, small colourful birds are kept as pets, as are domesticated shrews and tree beavers (smaller relatives of the river beaver).

Cats, notably, are not domesticated.

Next question: What are some of the most famous monumental structures?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Firebird766 » 07 Mar 2019 20:45

Curlyjimsam wrote:
22 Feb 2019 18:29
Next question: What are some of the most famous monumental structures?
Essu Beti doesn’t have any yet, so I’ll be answering this for their “mother” country, South Tenahuari.

The Ekkur Ili is a temple in the heart of the wealthy district of the coastal city of In Nuni Alu. It’s over a thousand years old, and the locals claim that in that time, it has not once lacked for a priest in residence. Now, South Tenahuari has never been one for keeping things exactly as they used to be- it’s undergone significant repairs and modifications since the original version was the religious center of a little pearl-diver’s town- but the stone foundations are mostly the same and the general layout is unchanged (just, you know, with a couple wings added on here and there). There just enough original left to avoid the Grandfather’s Axe paradox.

The Ekkur Ili is most well-known, other than the difficulty and expense involved for foreigners trying to visit the thing, for the massive mural on the underside of the main hall’s ceiling. This mural depicts all 12 afterlives in the Prexsivnai religion, and is very graphic when it comes to the 5 Hells. Please keep in mind that there is no proof that the artist made a point of depicting his and his family’s enemies as inhabitants in these hells, and that continuing to spread this story is not advised. The man’s considered a local hero, and recent circumstances have made people touchy about protecting what’s theirs. Gossip at your own risk.

Next: Who are some folk heroes in your conculture?

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