(EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2791
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Dormouse559 » 20 Aug 2018 03:10

The article says millennials are drinking more wine than other generations, not that they drink more wine than beer. I'd also hesitate to apply this information years in the past to high schoolers. (The article says its statistics are for 2015.)

I'd try to answer your central question, having been a millennial in high school at about that time, but I'm like Axiem; I didn't try alcohol until 21.

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2323
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Khemehekis » 20 Aug 2018 04:11

Dormouse559 wrote:
20 Aug 2018 03:10
The article says millennials are drinking more wine than other generations, not that they drink more wine than beer.
Well, I was thinking of this line: "Obtaining alcohol for consumption is no exception, and the millennial beverage of choice is wine."
I'd also hesitate to apply this information years in the past to high schoolers. (The article says its statistics are for 2015.)
This brings up an interesting point. In the late nineties, my peers were basically copying Gen-X culture. Listening to artists like the Offspring, Third Eye Blind, Alanis Morissette and Sarah McLachlan, partaking in extreme sports, drinking beer, raving, getting body piercing (the last of which would later prove as permanent as blue jeans instead of a temporary nineties fad). In social/political views, however, the first Millennials represented a break from the Reagan conservatism of eighties youth or the Clinton-voting Xers of the early nineties. Every year, my high school history/gov class would hold a reënactment of the Eugene Debs Trial, and the teacher asked the jurors to rule the way a teen-age Californian from the late nineties would instead of trying to be historically accurate. My 1979-born peers were the first class in the history of Mr. Hart's class that ruled in Debs' favor (not guilty). (Mr. Hart also explained that we rewrote history, as in the real Eugene Debs trial Mr. Debs was convicted.) We were called Generation Y, a sort of minor variation on Generation X. By the end of the decade, even the oldest American Millennials were too young to legally purchase at a bar.

In the current decade, the eleventies, on the other hand, the whole Millennial thing came out on its own, and this was when "Millennials" became a household word. Now media talk about Millennials all the time, how we're "disrupting" various industries and machines, and how we'd rather eat avocado toast than spend our money to settle down (while Xers, conversely, are settling down or have already). They ascribe to us some decidedly un-X-like traits, such as being soft snowflakes instead of tough realists; politically earnest and leftist instead of cynical and pragmatist; optimistic instead of pessimistic about the future of the world and the planet; helicopter-parented instead of thrown on the streets and neglected by parents; soi-disant "special" instead of self-loathing; giving free hugs instead of being standoffish. Whether or not all of you agree with these assessments (of Millennials or of Xers), America woke up and realized: Millennials are not Xers. The oldest Millennials are in our late thirties now, soon to be middle-aged. The youngest are in junior high.

2007-2008 was a sort of in-between zone. The first recognition of the nascent Millennial spirit by the public that I noticed was in 2001, when my high school and college peers accused Bush of being oil-hungry instead of falling in line with the jingoistic mood shared by most non-Millennial Americans after 9/11. Such earlier events as the Battle of Seattle and Napster began to look like harbingers of all this in retrospect. Then when Bush invaded Iraq in 2003, many different generations protested the war, including many Silents, but I saw a lot of "This generation is coming of age protesting a war like the Boomers instead of being like Gen X!!!" I even saw one blog entry that suggested generations alternate between conservative (Silent, Gen X) and liberal (Boomer, "Gen Y") . Then came MySpace and Facebook, and I began to hear people complain that these new kids couldn't write music the way Generation X did -- the new music, everyone was saying, was terrible! Jean Twenge wrote Generation Me, popularizing the idea that teens and twentysomethings couldn't adapt to a cold, hard world and had grown up constantly told they were special. There was a media furore over the victorious college women's lacrosse team greeting Junior in their flip-flops. Iraq loomed on with no end in sight, and older liberals criticized youth for not protesting the war the way young Boomers would have, while older conservatives criticized youth for not rallying around the president the way young Greatests would have. In 2007, Barack Obama was becoming a major celebrity, a "rock star politician", and the book Generation We was written. During this decade, Millennials were clearly forming a voice -- and a popular culture (emo, anyone?) -- separate from Generation X, but we were still called "Generation Y" by most people. Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, the Parkland school shooting, the candidacy of Bernie Sanders, the word "disruptive" applied positively, flipsters, and avocado toast were still in the future. Few people had heard of Antifa.

My musical is set right at that point in the 2007-2008 school year, when the oldest Millennials were 28-29, and the youngest were still preschoolers. So perhaps I should stick with beer. After all, in the late nineties, I was drinking beer, vodka and Drambuie.
I'd try to answer your central question, having been a millennial in high school at about that time, but I'm like Axiem; I didn't try alcohol until 21.
Well, thanks for trying to help. [:D]
Last edited by Khemehekis on 27 Aug 2018 04:09, edited 2 times in total.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 60,137 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4443
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by qwed117 » 20 Aug 2018 04:19

Dormouse559 wrote:
20 Aug 2018 03:10
The article says millennials are drinking more wine than other generations, not that they drink more wine than beer. I'd also hesitate to apply this information years in the past to high schoolers. (The article says its statistics are for 2015.)

I'd try to answer your central question, having been a millennial in high school at about that time, but I'm like Axiem; I didn't try alcohol until 21.
Y'all are good kids. Personally I find the smell of alcohol to be atrocious. I've known a couple of people who've gotten ragingly drunk. Already had bad opinions of them; and for the most part I'll attribute my puritanism to them

[but from what I hear, they'll get smashed on whatever they can find. Apparently there's a vodka or sth called "evergreen" or similar, and it's been associated with some alcohol poisonings]
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2323
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Khemehekis » 20 Aug 2018 04:25

qwed117 wrote:
20 Aug 2018 04:19
Personally I find the smell of alcohol to be atrocious.
I'm anosmic, so all I can do with alcohol is taste it (and some of it tastes pretty bad).
[but from what I hear, they'll get smashed on whatever they can find. Apparently there's a vodka or sth called "evergreen" or similar, and it's been associated with some alcohol poisonings]
Everclear?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 60,137 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

User avatar
Pabappa
sinic
sinic
Posts: 254
Joined: 18 Nov 2017 02:41
Contact:

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Pabappa » 20 Aug 2018 04:37

Ive always preferred wine to everything else. For people who dont like the taste of alcohol, there are some sweet wines like Zinfandel that to me taste just like soda, even with ~13% ABV. I used to drink several bottles a night whenever I didnt have work the next day. Mead tastes just like honey, I cant taste the alcohol in that either. I'll drink vodka but it's a drink of convenience ... no calories, so im going to get hungry soon .... and not that tasty. The other drinks Ive tried,Ive disliked for reasons of taste only. that includes beer, flavored vodkas, tequila. even good beers are just not my thing.

yes, i think Everclear is what youre thinking of, its basically pure alcohol, I wouldnt think it would cause poisoning though. Drinking hand sanitizer coul cause poisoning because of the other chemicasl in it but alcohol itself will not become poisonous just by being a very high ABV.

other reasons i like wine:
1) price isnt that much higher than beer. the cheapest wine is 2X the price of the cheapest beer, and cheaper than most other beers.
2) its versatile ... can mix with icecream, soda, or other drinks to make something that's chock full of calories and nutrients but also rich in alcohol. this also applies to vodka, though Ive never tried it. i think the fruitiness of wine leads to better taste combinations in general than with vodka.
Sorry guys, this one has the worst sting.

User avatar
KaiTheHomoSapien
greek
greek
Posts: 665
Joined: 15 Feb 2016 06:10
Location: Northern California

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 20 Aug 2018 04:42

I mean, I live in wine country and we have a vineyard on our property, so...yeah...if I didn't like wine, my family would probably disown me [xD] That said, I haven't had much, but I have liked what I've tried, though it has all been locally made. Wine is a common gift around here :)

User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2791
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Dormouse559 » 20 Aug 2018 05:02

Khemehekis wrote:
20 Aug 2018 04:11
Well, I was thinking of this line: "Obtaining alcohol for consumption is no exception, and the millennial beverage of choice is wine."
The article writer says that, but that just tells me they haven't read their own evidence; it's irrelevant to their assertion. And well, they're an undergrad writing in a section of a website with no editorial oversight. The little librarian on my shoulder says they don't qualify as a reliable source.

Khemenekis wrote: My musical is set right at that point in the 2007-2008 school year, when the oldest Millennials were 28-29, and the youngest were still preschoolers. So perhaps I should stick with beer. After all, in the late nineties, I was drinking beer, vodka and Drambuie.
Yeah, I doubt anyone will raise an eyebrow at beer.

User avatar
alynnidalar
roman
roman
Posts: 1035
Joined: 17 Aug 2014 03:22
Location: Michigan, USA

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by alynnidalar » 20 Aug 2018 17:20

I was a high schooler in 2007-2008, and while I wasn't the drinking type, people generally drank what they could get their hands on--when you're reliant on what other people buy for themselves (or for you), you don't have a lot of choice in the matter. As far as I was aware people mostly drank cheap beer and whatever stronger stuff their parents had around.

User avatar
Axiem
sinic
sinic
Posts: 394
Joined: 10 Sep 2016 06:56

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Axiem » 20 Aug 2018 20:46

Khemehekis wrote:
20 Aug 2018 04:11
My 1979-born peers ... We were called Generation Y... By the end of the decade, even the oldest American Millennials were too young to legally purchase at a bar.

...

in the 2007-2008 school year, when the oldest Millennials were 28-29, and the youngest were still preschoolers
Based on Wikipedia:
A minority of demographers and researchers start the generation in the mid-to-late 1970s, such as MetLife which uses birth dates ranging 1977–1994,[23] and Nielsen Media Research which uses the earliest dates from 1977 and the latest dates 1995 or 1996.[24][25][26]

The majority of researchers and demographers start the generation in the early 1980s, with some ending the generation in the mid-1990s. Australia's McCrindle Research[27] uses 1980–1994 as Generation Y birth years. A 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers[28] report used 1980 to 1995. Gallup Inc.,[29][30][31] and MSW Research[32] use 1980–1996. Ernst and Young uses 1981–1996.[33]

A 2018 report from Pew Research Center defines Millennials as born from 1981 to 1996, choosing these dates for "key political, economic and social factors", including September 11th terrorist attacks. This range makes Millennials 5 to 20 years old at the time of the attacks so "old enough to comprehend the historical significance." Pew indicated they'd use 1981 to 1996 for future publications but would remain open to date recalibration.[34]

Some end the generation in the late 1990s or early 2000s. Goldman Sachs,[35] Resolution Foundation,[36][37] all use 1980–2000. SYZYGY, a digital service agency partially owned by WPP, uses 1981–1998,[38][39]. The Asia Business Unit of Corporate Directions, Inc describes Millennials as born between 1981-2000,[40] The United States Chamber of Commerce uses 1980-1999[41] and United States Census Bureau uses 1982–2000.[42] The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary describes Millennials as those born roughly between the 1980s and 1990s.[43]

A 2013 Time magazine cover story used 1980 or 1981 as start dates.[44]

Demographers William Straus and Neil Howe who are widely credited with coining the term, define Millennials as born between 1982–2004.[2] However, Howe described the dividing line between millennials and the following Generation Z as "tentative", saying "you can’t be sure where history will someday draw a cohort dividing line until a generation fully comes of age". He noted that the millennials' range beginning in 1982 would point to the next generation's window starting between 2000 and 2006.[45]

In his 2008 book The Lucky Few: Between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boom, author Elwood Carlson defined this cohort as born between 1983–2001, based on the upswing in births after 1983 and finishing with the "political and social challenges" that occurred after the September 11 terrorist acts.[13] In 2016, U.S Pirg described millennials as those born between 1983 and 2000.[46][47][48] On the American television program Survivor, for their 33rd season, subtitled Millennials vs. Gen X, the "Millennial tribe" consisted of individuals born between 1984 and 1997.[49]

Due to birth-year overlap between definitions of Generation X and Millennials, some individuals born in the late 1970s and early 1980s see themselves as being "between" the two generations.[50][51][52][53] Names given to those born in the Generation X and Millennial cusp years include Xennials, Generation Catalano, and the Oregon Trail Generation.[53][54][55][56][57]
Personally, the way I define Millennial is: 1) remembers 9/11, and 2) does not remember the Challenger explosion. That generally means around 82—96, depending on the individual. It's fuzzy at the edges, though.

The idea of a Millennial being in preschool (i.e. 3 or 4 years old) in 2008 is weird to me. I definitely consider them in Generation Z, whatever that ends up being called. And 1979 to me is at the tail end of Generation X.
Conworld: Mto
:con: : Kuvian

User avatar
Jackk
roman
roman
Posts: 902
Joined: 04 Aug 2012 13:08
Location: tamed.speaks.points

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Jackk » 20 Aug 2018 20:47

I was born in 1998 and do not remember 9/11 (although I am British so hm)
I have always been somewhere on the border between Millennial on Gen Z.
Eresse anga paris cur neduc, a san teonga.
The only thing more dangerous than doubt is certainty.

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11588
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Aug 2018 21:44

Jackk wrote:
20 Aug 2018 20:47
I was born in 1998 and do not remember 9/11 (although I am British so hm)
I have always been somewhere on the border between Millennial on Gen Z.
I'm an American born in 1997 and I don't remember 9/11 either.

I don't care what generation I'm part of, because I personally don't think they're a valid way to group people.

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1636
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus » 20 Aug 2018 23:12

Personally, I think that, sociologically, it makes more sense to divide between 'Generation Y' or, say, 'X 2.0' or whatever and 'Millennials' proper.

To me, "Generation Y" (my lot) grew up alongside the internet. We fully remember Web 1.0, and even some pre-web things (Encarta! Civ II!), and while we're internet natives, we're not social media natives. Socially, we remember Before The Towers Fell and the Eden of the 1990s, but that era didn't belong to us. We tend to be politically and socially cynical and disengaged - we grew up at the high point of postmodern disillusionment, without even the passionate rebellion of the Xers (I remember the conversations we had about how even rebellion was pointless because it was just another form of conformity). We don't really have much identity.

Perhaps a cut-off would be 1993. Someone born in 1993 would have been 3 for Clinton's re-election, 4 for the Blair landslide, 7 for Bush-Gore and the Y2K bug, and 8 for 9/11 and Enron and the Dot-Com Crash - they don't really remember the era that came before, and these events probably had no significance for them if they were aware of it them at all. They were only 6 when they heard about Columbine. For fantasy fans, they were 3 when A Game of Thrones came out, and 8 for the first of the Peter Jackson films - we didn't have fantasy on film, but we did have TSR. In the UK, particularly important, they were only 4 when Channel 5 launched and 9 when Freeview came along: they're used to a TV landscape of dozens of channels, whereas we just had the four terrestrial channels. Similarly, online: they were 8 when Napster was shut down and iTunes was started (they don't remember a time before the iPod, and may not even remember the iPod - we remember miniDisc, damnit!), but 14 when Netflix started streaming video, 15 for Spotify, and so on. If we were the generation of pirates, they're the generation that expect not to have to pirate. And the reason I picked that year: when they turned 13, they were the first young generation to join the newly-expanded Facebook (Twitter launched the same year, and at the same time Google bought the fledgeling little Youtube). Whereas they were only 12 when AOL ended access to Usenet, and probably have no memory of it.

I honestly think that the massive impact of the 'new' web - social media, media streaming, smartphones, the app-ification of everything - makes for a pretty dramatic difference in how this generation - the Millennials - sees the world and acts in it, when compared to my own generation.


What would I set as an anterior bound? Well, anyone born before 1981 would have no longer been in school at the time of Columbine. Someone born in the UK before 1979 can probably remember Thatcher. Someone born in 1981 would have been 14 in 1995 - which means their formative computing experiences were with 3.1 (released 1992) or even DOS. Someone born in 1981 wouldn't have seen AOL access with a flat monthly fee (rather than our old pay-by-the hour, one-person-at-a-time experience) until they were 15. They'd have been 11 for Eternal September - my generation was too young to remember it even if we were technologically engaged. [and in our generation, many people still weren't - being a 'geek' or a 'nerd' was a term of abuse for the small percentage of kids who knew what Alta Vista was...]


So... I think my rough impression is that my generation were born approximately 1981-1993. Americans may want to round that to 1980-1992 and make it the Reagan/Bush years. We're followed by the Millennials. When do the Millennials end? Well, it's too early to say what will matter. But here's a first benchmark: if you were born in 2002 or later in America, you're the first generation to have become teenagers in a country where gay marriage was constitutionally guaranteed. [similarly, if you were born in 2001 in the UK, gay marriage was legal outside of northern ireland by the time you were a teenager]. I suspect this will turn out to be the sort of thing that shapes that generation's views of the world.

User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4490
Joined: 14 Aug 2012 19:32

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Creyeditor » 20 Aug 2018 23:24

I was born in 1993 and I feel a lot like I am a bit in between. I grew up in a rural area and I am not really digital native as much as my little brother is for example. On the other hand, my older friends grew up very differently regarding music and media culture.
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

User avatar
LinguistCat
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 192
Joined: 06 May 2017 07:48

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by LinguistCat » 21 Aug 2018 00:53

I was born in 1988 and feel I am strongly a Millennial, possibly even with some GenZ traits because I interact with alot of people younger than me, some even in high school or just starting their college years. AFAIK, while the boundary for Millennials and Gen Z-ers is particularly fuzzy, people who are under 18 are DEFINITELY Gen Z in my eyes and people as old as 23 could be seen as such, or as a Millennial.

Though to answer the question about getting alcohol, I'm pretty sure any of my friends in high school that did drink got it from older siblings or their parents' liquor cabinets or the one who looked older went to night clubs. We didn't do artisanal alcohol then, even if later there was somewhat of a push for it.

User avatar
Axiem
sinic
sinic
Posts: 394
Joined: 10 Sep 2016 06:56

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Axiem » 21 Aug 2018 02:50

Salmoneus wrote:
20 Aug 2018 23:12
Personally, I think that, sociologically, it makes more sense to divide between 'Generation Y' or, say, 'X 2.0' or whatever and 'Millennials' proper.
There are some people who are calling the early wave of the Millennials the Xennials, or Oregon Trail generation. That is, the people who had an analog childhood but a digital adolescence. (The term Millennial, for what its worth, was given to those who were coming of age at the turn of the millennium, not those born in the new millennium)

Yes, the labels are arbitrary and are broad brushes to paint entire populations...but there are definite trends I've noticed.

In particular, as an early Millennial, I find that when I talk to people even a couple years older than I am, there feels like this massive cultural gap in terms of how we view the world, technology, and so on. On the other hand, there feels like almost no cultural gap when I interact with people in their mid-20s now. We have the same sorts of complaints about our parents ("why are they calling instead of texting?"), understand the same jokes, and so on.

It's hard for me to completely dismiss the generation idea. Though, I think it's somewhat more localized; it would quite possibly cut differently in the UK based on cultural trends there, compared to the US.
When do the Millennials end?
On that note, though, when I interact with people in their teens, it's like they're in a completely different world. The exact same sorts of cultural gaps I feel with people a few years older than I am, I feel with teenagers, and the cutoff point seems like it's somewhere around 20 years old.

From my perspective, people in high school are undoubtedly a different generation from me, and in many ways have more in common with my kids than they do me, in terms of their expectations of the world.

Or, in a silly way:
- Millennials used Facebook back when it was limited to universities and high schools
- Gen Z's don't use Facebook because only old people use it, and as far as they know, everyone's always been on Facebook
- Gen X and older are the people sharing shitty memes and terrible politics on Facebook
Conworld: Mto
:con: : Kuvian

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1636
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus » 21 Aug 2018 13:14

Axiem wrote:
21 Aug 2018 02:50
Salmoneus wrote:
20 Aug 2018 23:12
Personally, I think that, sociologically, it makes more sense to divide between 'Generation Y' or, say, 'X 2.0' or whatever and 'Millennials' proper.
There are some people who are calling the early wave of the Millennials the Xennials, or Oregon Trail generation. That is, the people who had an analog childhood but a digital adolescence. (The term Millennial, for what its worth, was given to those who were coming of age at the turn of the millennium, not those born in the new millennium)
Yes, but I think the general use of the term has shifted over time.

Yes, the labels are arbitrary and are broad brushes to paint entire populations...but there are definite trends I've noticed.

In particular, as an early Millennial, I find that when I talk to people even a couple years older than I am, there feels like this massive cultural gap in terms of how we view the world, technology, and so on. On the other hand, there feels like almost no cultural gap when I interact with people in their mid-20s now. We have the same sorts of complaints about our parents ("why are they calling instead of texting?"), understand the same jokes, and so on.
Whereas I've found a major gap talking to people just a couple of years younger than me. For instance, my friends and I, when arranging to meet somewhere, would use a combination of e-mails (at a distance) and then text messages (near to the place/time) (though admittedly whatsapp has been taking over both functions more recently); but one of my friends has a husband a few years younger and he and his friends would arrange everything, even down to the level of 'hi I'm here but I can't see you which table are you at?' through Facebook on their smartphones - I know it seems like a small thing, but it represents, I think, how social media shifted between the generations from "a way some of us keep up with people we don't see often" to "the central index of all parts of life". Similarly, that guy and his friends follow youtubers; whereas we just sometimes search for something on youtube and instinctively think that youtubers aren't real celebrities and should get a proper job. [That guy and his friends are also, incidentally, "politically" engaged online]

The 'same jokes' thing is a big issue for me, I think. The cultural, and particularly comedic, touchstones of my development are alien, or at least non-native, to 'true Millennials'. I mean, someone born in 1993 was 4 when classic Simpsons ended*. The comedic language I inherited from Gen-X - Blackadder, Drop the Dead Donkey, Yes Minister and Red Dwarf repeats, Deayton-era HIGNFY - is largely (except maybe blackadder, thanks to history teachers filling time on the last day of term) foreign to millennials, the language my peers were developing (which I never took to) of Shooting Stars and the Fast Show and the League of Gentlemen and so on is even more obscure, and even the American shows we started importing later - comedies like Friends and Frasier (though I never much liked Frasier) and above all the Simpsons, and comic dramas like Buffy and The West Wing - may be recognised but aren't part of their core vocabulary the way they were for us. Even the simpsons jokes they still reference, they often don't even know what they're referencing.

I mean, someone who's 21 today - they were born in 1997, so they never saw classic Simpsons live and even in the UK they probably didn't see repeats (other than by browsing through digital backwaters at 11 at night), and they were 6 when Buffy ended. The Red Dwarf revival that electrified my (admittedly geeky) peers with excitement? They were just born when VII disappointed, and were 2 for the catastrophe of VIII. But still only 15 when X began the second revival! They were just born or 1 year old at the time of Izzard's Glorious and Dressed to Kill. How can I hope to share a comedic language with this people? I mean gosh darnit, these people were 12 when the Wire was shown in the UK!



*in the UK, we got it later - 'real' Simpsons for me ran at 6pm daily on BBC2 from 1997 to 2006, the first 14 series, after which the show ceased to exist, other than a few repeats on C4.
It's hard for me to completely dismiss the generation idea. Though, I think it's somewhat more localized; it would quite possibly cut differently in the UK based on cultural trends there, compared to the US.
In the UK it's complicated. We did have our own eras, delayed - our 90s were basically the grimier, cooler, sleazier extension of the 80s, and the American 90s of Bill Clinton (/Tony Blair, our version) and optimism and the third way and all that only made it over here in 1997. But of course, technological changes happened here the same time as over there, and over the last couple of decades we've been synching up to US TV, from "never happen" through to "probably a five year delay for most things" right up to "airs the week after but everyone's watched online by then" and "wait, does the UK actually have its own TV anymore?".
Or, in a silly way:
- Millennials used Facebook back when it was limited to universities and high schools
Except no! MY (I think OUR?) generation used (or didn't use Facebook) back then. But from 2006, it was open to anyone 13 or over, so anyone born 1993 or later has always had Facebook-for-everyone.

I think my categorisation would be:
-pre-Boomers either haven't heard of Facebook or use it extensively
- Boomers claim not to have time to use Facebook, but when they do use Facebook, they tell people about it
- Generation X use Facebook, but only ironically
- "Xennials" mostly took enthusiastically to Facebook as a shiny new thing, but came to it during the universities-era when it was a replacement for FriendsReunited and MySpace, and still basically view it as a tool for keeping in touch and maybe a surrogate blog (Generation Y had blogs! And internet forums! And maybe even chatrooms!)
- Millennials have always had Facebook, and it's the core of their existence (though fashionable ones may be moving away from it to other social media platforms, often linked to their Facebook)
- Zs have Facebook to placate their parents, but it's not linked to their other social media accounts (which may also not be linked).

User avatar
Axiem
sinic
sinic
Posts: 394
Joined: 10 Sep 2016 06:56

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Axiem » 21 Aug 2018 15:57

Salmoneus wrote:
21 Aug 2018 13:14
Yes, but I think the general use of the term has shifted over time.
I mean, the number of people (generally Boomers) who basically just use it to mean "kids these days"...

(But I'm going with the definition that all the polling firms use, which is early-80's-to-mid-90's)
Whereas I've found a major gap talking to people just a couple of years younger than me. For instance, my friends and I, when arranging to meet somewhere, would use a combination of e-mails (at a distance) and then text messages (near to the place/time) (though admittedly whatsapp has been taking over both functions more recently); but one of my friends has a husband a few years younger and he and his friends would arrange everything, even down to the level of 'hi I'm here but I can't see you which table are you at?' through Facebook on their smartphones - I know it seems like a small thing, but it represents, I think, how social media shifted between the generations from "a way some of us keep up with people we don't see often" to "the central index of all parts of life". Similarly, that guy and his friends follow youtubers; whereas we just sometimes search for something on youtube and instinctively think that youtubers aren't real celebrities and should get a proper job. [That guy and his friends are also, incidentally, "politically" engaged online]
The gap you're describing is exactly the gap I have between myself (born in 1984) and people a few years older than me. I only use e-mail to interact with businesses and get newsletters; any actual discussion with friends happens over Signal, Facebook, or texting (depending on the person).

Also, I follow youtubers, and it's weird to me that people wouldn't. (Though I don't do it in Youtube itself, but rather through their Patreons and following them on social media to find out when they get new videos posted)
Blackadder, Drop the Dead Donkey, Yes Minister and Red Dwarf repeats, Deayton-era HIGNFY
The only one of those I'm even remotely familiar with is Red Dwarf, and I think I've maybe seen one episode once?
Except no! MY (I think OUR?) generation used (or didn't use Facebook) back then.
You keep sounding like a Gen Xer. I was on Facebook day 1 that it was available at my college, as were many of my friends. One of my friends from high school went to Harvard and is has a Facebook user ID in the 2-digits. Yes, it wasn't there when I was in high school or my first year or so of college, but it quickly became ubiquitous.
- Boomers claim not to have time to use Facebook, but when they do use Facebook, they tell people about it
I'm quite the opposite on this. All the Boomers on Facebook I know are the most active users and are the ones always posting stupid things.
a replacement for FriendsReunited and MySpace
I've never heard of the first one, and the second one was dead long before I touched a university campus.
- Millennials have always had Facebook, and it's the core of their existence
I don't see this as a differentiator between early-wave-Millennials and late-wave-Millennials. I know plenty of early-wave-Millennials who are always on Facebook and use it to organize their social lives, basically; and I know plenty of late-wave-Millennials who barely use it. It's more that all of us recognize its ubiquity and utility, but engage it in different ways for various reasons. But it's not like "how weird are those people for using this new-fangled thing! Back in my day..."; it's more like how we accept that different people watch sports in different amounts, but sports are still always there.
Conworld: Mto
:con: : Kuvian

User avatar
Reyzadren
greek
greek
Posts: 458
Joined: 14 May 2017 10:39
Contact:

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Reyzadren » 22 Aug 2018 00:04

It's 2018, and we still don't have a social media site that allows one to customise one's own font family, font size, font colour or even background picture. I'd be more interested otherwise.

Yes, I know that some sites had such features in the past, but it's about the here and now.
Image Soundcloud Profile | Image griuskant conlang

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4443
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by qwed117 » 22 Aug 2018 03:01

Reyzadren wrote:
22 Aug 2018 00:04
It's 2018, and we still don't have a social media site that allows one to customise one's own font family, font size, font colour or even background picture. I'd be more interested otherwise.

Yes, I know that some sites had such features in the past, but it's about the here and now.
oh god no, the boomers would use Papyrus and comic sans
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

User avatar
gach
MVP
MVP
Posts: 702
Joined: 07 Aug 2013 01:26
Location: displaced from Helsinki

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by gach » 22 Aug 2018 18:58

Reyzadren wrote:
22 Aug 2018 00:04
It's 2018, and we still don't have a social media site that allows one to customise one's own font family, font size, font colour or even background picture. I'd be more interested otherwise.
When you work in the field of physical sciences, you tend to get the occasional crackpot spam from enthusiastic kitchen theoreticians explaining their personal go at a theory of everything in a selection of colourful fonts, in larger than default point size, short lines, and center alignment. It quickly becomes clear that a whimsical presentation at least doesn't do any good for getting your message across.

A well thought out uniform style that gets out of the way is king, and we should know it. After all, it's 2018.
ImageKištaLkal sikSeic

Post Reply