(EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 6375
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore » 14 Aug 2019 00:36

Didn’t she, or someone anyway, also use colors, and/or stones?
Wouldn’t there be a difference between the hypothetical Project Cinnabar, the hypothetical Project Vermilion, and the hypothetical Project Terlinguaite?

shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 11590
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar » 14 Aug 2019 02:32

eldin raigmore wrote:
14 Aug 2019 00:36
Didn’t she, or someone anyway, also use colors, and/or stones?
Wouldn’t there be a difference between the hypothetical Project Cinnabar, the hypothetical Project Vermilion, and the hypothetical Project Terlinguaite?
I must admit I can't recall any specific names xe used, but I believe you're correct about someone, or multiple someones, using color names. As for stones, it's very possible. I'm afraid I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to geology, so if presented with a number of "Project X" names, I doubt I'd know whether they referred to minerals, stones, or other substances/materials.
Edit: I've realized since responding to Thrice Xandvii that Corphishy recently started a thread for a "Project Garnet", which may be what prompted the question. In any case, it seems that the tradition is alive.

User avatar
KaiTheHomoSapien
greek
greek
Posts: 665
Joined: 15 Feb 2016 06:10
Location: Northern California

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 14 Aug 2019 05:07

I kind of like the "Project X" naming scheme, even though I've never used it. I tend to come up with a name for the language right away, although it's certainly subject to change. ("Lihmelinyan" was originally called "Mantian", before I decided to make the latter an umbrella term like "Romance"). But the "Project X" naming scheme makes me think of tech companies and their various code names for unreleased software. It's cool :)

User avatar
LinguistCat
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 194
Joined: 06 May 2017 07:48

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by LinguistCat » 15 Aug 2019 01:36

I hadn't really even noticed this was a major naming scheme. I guess I'm a little too stuck in my own head and mostly skim thread titles for things I'm interested in, so names like this would hardly even register...

Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 783
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni » 12 Sep 2019 12:49

What does the following sentence mean: College wasn't off to a good start.

Does it mean: College doesn't seem to start out well?
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1636
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus » 12 Sep 2019 13:14

It means "college" has just begun (most naturally that they have just gone to college for the first time), and already things related to "college" (which here is not the institution but the experience) have gone wrong.

Literally, "off to a good start" is said of runners (etc) who start a race well, but more generally it's now used widely for the beginning of projects and experiences. It's colloquial, but very widespread. It can retain an edge of humour, as idioms often do. "Not off to a good start" is 'literally' only a fairly mild criticism, but it's usually used as a wry understatement (though in that context I'm more used to 'not off to a great start' (italics showing both difference and emphasis). The positive form, "off to a good start" is itself often found in the form of wry sarcasm. Either way, the phrase often has a connotation of self-deprecation.

So yes, if someone says to you "college isn't off to a good start", they mean their experience of and/or performance at college has not begun as well as they might have hoped; but it also probably means they're trying to convey the impression that they're detached, worldly-wise observers able to see the funny side. [it also be used without that connotation, with a different intonation... in which case things are probably REALLY bad and it's massive understatement]


It's interesting, actually, because in "X is off to a good start" (and related phrases), "X" can be either the athlete or the race, and by extension the individual or the project. And "college" is an interesting subject because it's not entirely clear what it is (the time, the experience, the project, the place, the people, the...)

Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 783
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni » 12 Sep 2019 13:26

Salmoneus wrote:
12 Sep 2019 13:14
It means "college" has just begun (most naturally that they have just gone to college for the first time), and already things related to "college" (which here is not the institution but the experience) have gone wrong. ...
Thank you, Salmoneus, for your fast in in-depth answer!

Here is my translation: Das College fing ja schon mal gut an. This is of course meant ironical.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.

Post Reply