Language practice thread

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sangi39
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by sangi39 » 17 Sep 2015 21:23

Mér líkar ekki við græn* egg og skinka. Mér líkar ekki við þau**, Sam-ég-er.
I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.

* Not overly sure what to do with a single adjective which is modifying two nouns of different genders and numbers.
** Similar issue with "they" as with "green".
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
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So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Testyal » 17 Sep 2015 22:30

我不喜欢绿蛋和火腿。 我不喜欢,Sam我是。
Wǒ bù xǐhuān lǜ dàn hé huǒtuǐ. Wǒ bù xǐhuān, Sam wǒ shì.
I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.
:deu: :fra: :zho: :epo:

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Sep 2015 02:45

thetha wrote:Je n'ai pas bu beaucoup de sortes de bière; mon expérience a été principalement avec l'alcool plus fort. J'aime le whisky.
I haven't had many kinds of beer; my experience has mostly been with stronger drinks. I like whiskey [:)]
Das finde ich ganz interessant. Manchmal wünsche ich, dass das amerikanische Alter von legalem Alkoholtrinken weniger wäre, weil ich am mindestens ihn probieren will.
I find that quite interesting. Sometimes I wish the American drinking age were lower, since I want to at least try alcohol.

Es ist augenscheinlich überall, aber ich weiß nicht, ob ich ihn mag, oder nicht.
It's seemingly everywhere, but I don't know whether I like it or not.

Aber die meiste Zeit, es ist eigentlich mir egal.
But most of the time, I don't really care too much about that.

Finden einige Leute, die nicht Amerikaner sind, unser Alter von legalem Alkoholtrinken ungewöhnlich oder am mindestens ein bisschen überraschend? Vielleicht bin ich ganz falsch, aber ich glaube, dass Leute mir erzählen haben, dass dieses Alter relativ hoch hier ist.
Do some people who aren't American find our legal drinking age unusual or at least a bit surprising? I may be completely wrong, but I think people have told me that the age in question is relatively high here.

(I probably really messed up that last sentence, and possible some of the others.)

Testyal wrote:从这儿https://youtu.be/Med2XipHJJM?t=104
cóng zhè'er
From here
Oft sagen Leute, dass ostasiatische Musikvideos sehr ungewöhnlich sind, aber ich bin sicher, dass sie nicht so verrückt scheinen, wenn man die Sprache des Musikvideos verstehen.
People often say that East Asian music videos are really weird, but I'm sure they don't seem so crazy if you understand the language they're in.

Bonjour! Je m'appelle shimobaatar. J'apprends le français maintenant. Je l'aime beaucoup, mais je ne parle pas le bien encore.
Hello! My name is shimobaatar. I'm learning French now. I like it very much, but I don't speak it well yet.

(I effectively started learning French at school last week, so I'm sure there are several errors in those sentences, especially concerning direct object pronoun placement paired with verb negation, and adverb placement in general. That's not to say my German is anywhere near being free from errors, though.) [:P]

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Dormouse559 » 20 Sep 2015 04:16

shimobaatar wrote:Finden einige Leute, die nicht Amerikaner sind, unser Alter von legalem Alkoholtrinken ungewöhnlich oder am mindestens ein bisschen überraschend? Vielleicht bin ich ganz falsch, aber ich glaube, dass Leute mir erzählen haben, dass dieses Alter relativ hoch hier ist.
Do some people who aren't American find our legal drinking age unusual or at least a bit surprising? I may be completely wrong, but I think people have told me that the age in question is relatively high here.
Quand une de mes amies est allée en Angleterre pour étudier, elle avait 20 ans, et parfois on lui mentionnait qu'elle pouvait y boire parce que l'âge légal pour boire est 18 ans.
When one of my friends studied abroad in England, she was 20 years old, and sometimes people would mention that she could drink there because the legal drinking age is 18.

Ça n'importait pas beaucoup; aux États-Unis, elle aurait eu le droit de boire après quelques mois en tout cas.
It wasn't that important; in the U.S., she would've been able to drink legally in a few months anyway.
shimobaatar wrote:Bonjour! Je m'appelle shimobaatar. J'apprends le français maintenant. Je l'aime beaucoup, mais je ne le parle pas le encore bien.
Hello! My name is shimobaatar. I'm learning French now. I like it very much, but I don't speak it well yet.

(I effectively started learning French at school last week, so I'm sure there are several errors in those sentences, especially concerning direct object pronoun placement paired with verb negation, and adverb placement in general. That's not to say my German is anywhere near being free from errors, though.) [:P]
Presque parfait! Même pas de fautes d'orthographe.
Almost perfect. Not even a spelling mistake.
Last edited by Dormouse559 on 20 Sep 2015 04:44, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by GrandPiano » 20 Sep 2015 04:36

shimobaatar wrote:Bonjour! Je m'appelle shimobaatar. J'apprends le français maintenant. Je l'aime beaucoup, mais je ne parle pas le bien encore.
Hello! My name is shimobaatar. I'm learning French now. I like it very much, but I don't speak it well yet.
¡Hola! Me llamo GrandPiano. Yo aprendo español. ¡Mucho gusto!
Hello! My name is GrandPiano. I'm learning Spanish. I like it a lot!

(How's that? That's all I know how to say. I feel like the last two sentences should be one sentence, but that's probably just because that's what you would do in Mandarin, which is also pro-drop.)
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Sep 2015 05:11

Dormouse559 wrote:Quand une de mes amies est allée en Angleterre pour étudier, elle avait 20 ans, et parfois on lui mentionnait qu'elle pouvait y boire parce que lâge légal pour boire est 18 ans.
When one of my friends studied abroad in England, she was 20 years old, and sometimes people would mention that she could drink there because the legal drinking age is 18.

Ça n'importait pas beaucoup; aux États-Unis, elle aurait eu le droit de boire après quelques mois en tout cas.
It wasn't that important; in the U.S., she would've been able to drink legally in a few months anyway.
Als ich ungefähr vierzehn Jahre alt war, bin ich mit einigen anderen Studenten nach Deutschland gereist, und einige Studenten, die sechzehn Jahre alt waren, haben Bier probiert. Nichts Bemerkenswertes ist passiert.
When I was about fourteen years old, I went to Germany with a few other students, and some of the students who were sixteen tried beer. Nothing noteworthy happened.
Dormouse559 wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:Bonjour! Je m'appelle shimobaatar. J'apprends le français maintenant. Je l'aime beaucoup, mais je ne le parle pas le encore bien.
Hello! My name is shimobaatar. I'm learning French now. I like it very much, but I don't speak it well yet.

(I effectively started learning French at school last week, so I'm sure there are several errors in those sentences, especially concerning direct object pronoun placement paired with verb negation, and adverb placement in general. That's not to say my German is anywhere near being free from errors, though.) [:P]
Presque parfait! Même pas de fautes d'orthographe.
Almost perfect. Not even a spelling mistake.
Merci beaucoup! [:D]
Thank you very much!
GrandPiano wrote:¡Hola! Me llamo GrandPiano. Yo aprendo español. ¡Mucho gusto!
Hello! My name is GrandPiano. I'm learning Spanish. I like it a lot!

(How's that? That's all I know how to say. I feel like the last two sentences should be one sentence, but that's probably just because that's what you would do in Mandarin, which is also pro-drop.)
No estoy un experto, pero… "Yo aprendo español" no es incorrecto, pero no necesitas decir "yo". Si quieres combinar las dos oraciones últimas, puedes decir "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". Creo que se puede decir "Aprendo el español" también, pero no sé exactamente cómo es diferente.
I'm no expert, but… "Yo aprendo español" isn't wrong, but you don't need to say "yo". If you want to combine the last two sentences, you can say "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". I think one can say "Aprendo el español" as well, but I don't know exactly how that's different.

(I might be wrong about any of that; as I said, I'm no expert. I also probably forgot to use subjunctive/conditional/etc. somewhere, maybe after "si" if nowhere else, but I'm too tired to go back and thoroughly examine what I've written.)

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by loglorn » 20 Sep 2015 05:21

shimobaatar wrote:No soy un experto, pero… "Yo aprendo español" no es incorrecto, pero no necesitas decir "yo". Si quieres combinar las dos oraciones últimas, puedes decir "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". Creo que se puede decir "Aprendo el español" también, pero no sé exactamente cómo es diferente.
I'm no expert, but… "Yo aprendo español" isn't wrong, but you don't need to say "yo". If you want to combine the last two sentences, you can say "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". I think one can say "Aprendo el español" as well, but I don't know exactly how that's different.

(I might be wrong about any of that; as I said, I'm no expert. I also probably forgot to use subjunctive/conditional/etc. somewhere, maybe after "si" if nowhere else, but I'm too tired to go back and thoroughly examine what I've written.)
In a related matter, i believe you could also say "Me gusta mucho aprender español" for "I like learning Spanish a lot".

And, is las dos right? I feel like dos is masculine when it should be feminine (as always, my suggestions may be wrong because i'm basing it off Portuguese)
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Sep 2015 05:27

loglorn wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:No soy un experto, pero… "Yo aprendo español" no es incorrecto, pero no necesitas decir "yo". Si quieres combinar las dos oraciones últimas, puedes decir "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". Creo que se puede decir "Aprendo el español" también, pero no sé exactamente cómo es diferente.
I'm no expert, but… "Yo aprendo español" isn't wrong, but you don't need to say "yo". If you want to combine the last two sentences, you can say "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". I think one can say "Aprendo el español" as well, but I don't know exactly how that's different.

(I might be wrong about any of that; as I said, I'm no expert. I also probably forgot to use subjunctive/conditional/etc. somewhere, maybe after "si" if nowhere else, but I'm too tired to go back and thoroughly examine what I've written.)
In a related matter, i believe you could also say "Me gusta mucho aprender español" for "I like learning Spanish a lot".

And, is las dos right? I feel like dos is masculine when it should be feminine (as always, my suggestions may be wrong because i'm basing it off Portuguese)
(Yes, I also think you could say "Me gusta mucho aprender (el) español" or "Me gusta aprender (el) español mucho" or some permutation thereof. One or more of those may be wrong; I'm not sure.

I could also be wrong about this, but I think you can say las dos if the noun that follows is feminine.

The "ser/estar" distinction is often a bit confusing for me. Why would you use "ser" in the place you indicated above? I would have thought that would imply I could never be an expert, no matter what.)

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by qwed117 » 20 Sep 2015 05:37

shimobaatar wrote:
loglorn wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:No soy un experto, pero… "Yo aprendo español" no es incorrecto, pero no necesitas decir "yo". Si quieres combinar las dos oraciones últimas, puedes decir "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". Creo que se puede decir "Aprendo el español" también, pero no sé exactamente cómo es diferente.
I'm no expert, but… "Yo aprendo español" isn't wrong, but you don't need to say "yo". If you want to combine the last two sentences, you can say "Aprendo español, y me gusta mucho". I think one can say "Aprendo el español" as well, but I don't know exactly how that's different.

(I might be wrong about any of that; as I said, I'm no expert. I also probably forgot to use subjunctive/conditional/etc. somewhere, maybe after "si" if nowhere else, but I'm too tired to go back and thoroughly examine what I've written.)
In a related matter, i believe you could also say "Me gusta mucho aprender español" for "I like learning Spanish a lot".

And, is las dos right? I feel like dos is masculine when it should be feminine (as always, my suggestions may be wrong because i'm basing it off Portuguese)
(Yes, I also think you could say "Me gusta mucho aprender (el) español" or "Me gusta aprender (el) español mucho" or some permutation thereof. One or more of those may be wrong; I'm not sure.

I could also be wrong about this, but I think you can say las dos if the noun that follows is feminine.

The "ser/estar" distinction is often a bit confusing for me. Why would you use "ser" in the place you indicated above? I would have thought that would imply I could never be an expert, no matter what.)
Me dijeron que usas ser para ocupaciónes. Experto es un ocupación, ¿no?
I was told that you use "ser" for occupations.(Being) expert is an occupation, right?
Spoiler:
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Dormouse559 » 20 Sep 2015 05:39

loglorn wrote:And, is las dos right? I feel like dos is masculine when it should be feminine (as always, my suggestions may be wrong because i'm basing it off Portuguese)
Contrairement à "dois" en portugais, "dos" en espagnol ne s'accorde pas en genre.
Unlike Portuguese "dois", Spanish "dos" doesn't agree in gender.

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by shimobaatar » 20 Sep 2015 05:48

qwed117 wrote: Me dijeron que usas ser para ocupaciónes. Experto es un ocupación, ¿no?
I was told that you use "ser" for occupations.(Being) expert is an occupation, right?
(I would consider it too general of a term, but you're probably correct.)

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Thrice Xandvii » 20 Sep 2015 09:58

shimobaatar wrote:(I would consider it too general of a term, but you're probably correct.)
(True, but you don't just stop being an expert at some random point during the day... So "ser" seems right to me. I've been wrong before though. However, I would never describe being an expert as a career itself.)
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Lao Kou » 20 Sep 2015 11:53

Thrice Xandvii wrote:
shimobaatar wrote:(I would consider it too general of a term, but you're probably correct.)
(True, but you don't just stop being an expert at some random point during the day... So "ser" seems right to me. I've been wrong before though. However, I would never describe being an expert as a career itself.)
I imagine Lam has a whole pedagogical bag o' tricks on the subject of ser/estar. I would also imagine almost anything of the "I'm a (noun)." variety uses ser. "Expert" may not be a career, per se (and I wouldn't get hung up on this), but neither is "elephant". "I'm not an elephant." using estar? [O.O] I don't think so.

Tell me about your friend (what are they like?):

Well, s/he's:

a doctor
tall
blond
Russian
handsome
a good person
an expert in taekwondo
not an elephant

seem ser turf to me.

Well, s/he's:

dead [O.O] (would you lead with that in describing a friend? isn't it a state?)
married (it's called marital status) (but: he's XX's husband - ser)

estar turf. And then, tell me about your friend (how are they?)

Well, s/he's:

fine
happy
working in Bimini
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by loglorn » 20 Sep 2015 15:53

ポルトガル語では、ele está casado かそれの変化を全然聞こえなかった。

In Portuguese, I've never heard "ele está casado" or any variations thereof.
Dormouse559 wrote:
loglorn wrote:And, is las dos right? I feel like dos is masculine when it should be feminine (as always, my suggestions may be wrong because i'm basing it off Portuguese)
Contrairement à "dois" en portugais, "dos" en espagnol ne s'accorde pas en genre.
Unlike Portuguese "dois", Spanish "dos" doesn't agree in gender.
Oh, okay then.
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 20 Sep 2015 19:15

Ser et Estar? Avez-vous besoin de visiter ce topique?
Ser and Estar? Y'all just had to go there?

Alors, qu'est-ce qui est caché dans mon sac sans fond?
Lemme see now, what have I got in my bag of holding?

SER:

D - descripción
O - ocupación
C - características
T - time (hora, fecha)
O - orígen
R - relación

ESTAR:
P- Posición
L- Location
A- Acción
C- Condición
E- Emoción



http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/1000 ... f7lnW-FNy0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mUSK7RRA3E

d'accord?
Can you dig it?
:mrgreen:

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 20 Sep 2015 19:23

loglorn wrote:ポルトガル語では、ele está casado かそれの変化を全然聞こえなかった。

In Portuguese, I've never heard "ele está casado" or any variations thereof.
.
Ja ja ja ja ja ja.
Ha ha ha ha ha.


En español, somos novios.
In Spanish, we're going steady/just married (supposedly finite conditions, but with SER)

Pero, estamos casados.
But we're married (supposedly forever, but with ESTAR)


Es todo una jodida lingüística. [B)]
It's all linguistic smoke-n-mirrors. [:P]

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by loglorn » 20 Sep 2015 20:08

Lambuzhao wrote:
loglorn wrote:ポルトガル語では、ele está casado かそれの変化を全然聞こえなかった。

In Portuguese, I've never heard "ele está casado" or any variations thereof.
.
Ja ja ja ja ja ja.
Ha ha ha ha ha.


En español, somos novios.
In Spanish, we're going steady/just married (supposedly finite conditions, but with SER)

Pero, estamos casados.
But we're married (supposedly forever, but with ESTAR)


Es todo una jodida lingüística. [B)]
It's all linguistic smoke-n-mirrors. [:P]
ポルトガル語はほうが理にかなうみたいだ。"Estamos noivos"と"Somos casados"は正しい使い方。
It seems Portuguese makes more sense. "Estamos noivos" and "somos casados" is the right usage.

そして、"ele é morto"を言える、人は何年も死んでいれば。
Also, you can say "ele é morto", if the person's been dead for years.
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Lao Kou » 20 Sep 2015 20:13

Lambuzhao wrote:Alors, qu'est-ce qui est caché dans mon sac sans fond?
Lemme see now, what have I got in my bag of holding?
Image
SER: D-O-C-T-O-R; ESTAR: P-L-A-C-E
C'est ça ce dont je parlais. [B)]
Now that's what I'm talkin' about.
En español, somos novios.
In Spanish, we're going steady/just married (supposedly finite conditions, but with SER)
Newlyweds/steady Freddies/gentlemen callers; we're nouns.
Pero, estamos casados.
But we're married (supposedly forever, but with ESTAR)
Death, at least on this physical and grammatical plane, is also forever, but a state, which ESTARs it.
d'accord?
Can you dig it? :mrgreen:
Dewd.
道可道,非常道
名可名,非常名

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by shimobaatar » 22 Sep 2015 18:14

More on "ser"/"estar":
Spoiler:
Thrice Xandvii wrote:(True, but you don't just stop being an expert at some random point during the day... So "ser" seems right to me. I've been wrong before though. However, I would never describe being an expert as a career itself.)
Lao Kou wrote:I imagine Lam has a whole pedagogical bag o' tricks on the subject of ser/estar. I would also imagine almost anything of the "I'm a (noun)." variety uses ser. "Expert" may not be a career, per se (and I wouldn't get hung up on this), but neither is "elephant". "I'm not an elephant." using estar? [O.O] I don't think so.
I guess I was looking at it the way I was because I figured that not being an expert was a condition, so to speak, that could potentially change later in one's life, as opposed to not being an elephant.

Oh, just in case it seems like I'm fighting this or being intentionally difficult or anything, I know I'm wrong here, or at least I'm pretty sure I am, but I'm just trying to figure out why, exactly. I tend to really overthink things like the distinction between "ser" and "estar"… looking at more of Lao Kou's examples from my crazy point of view:
Lao Kou wrote:a doctor
tall
blond
Russian
handsome
a good person
an expert in taekwondo
not an elephant

seem ser turf to me.
You could retire from being a doctor, and I assume a doctor could potentially no longer be allowed to work as a doctor after some kind of malpractice case. People tend to become less tall as they age. Approximately 98% of children born with blond hair do not have naturally blond hair as adults. Although being born in Russia and being ethnically Russian aren't things that can change, living in Russia and being a Russian citizen can change. Handsomeness isn't necessarily retained from birth until death. It's possible for you to find out something about someone that changes your opinion of them being a good person. If you don't practice a martial art for a while for whatever reason, you could forget a lot of what you once knew. Not being an elephant isn't something that could change, though.

As I said, I know I'm really, really overthinking it.
Lambuzhao wrote:SER:

D - descripción
O - ocupación
C - características
T - time (hora, fecha)
O - orígen
R - relación

ESTAR:
P- Posición
L- Location
A- Acción
C- Condición
E- Emoción
Thank you for the acronyms; I've seen similar ones before, but never these two exactly. Hopefully they'll work better for me than others have in the past (especially since being a "doctor" is an occupation and a "place" is a location).

Writing this post, I think I've come to realize that my main obstacle in differentiating between the two verbs here is that the basic definition of "ser = permanent, estar = temporary" that I heard when I began to study Spanish has really stuck with me, and seems to override the more specific rules I've heard since then. Although the difference between description/characteristic and condition/emotion isn't the clearest for me, either. Both are points to work on; thank you all for your help! [:D]

Ayer aprendí algo sobre preguntas en francés por la primera vez. Son un poco más complicado que supuse que serían.
Yesterday, I learned something about questions in French for the first time. They're a little more complicated than I assumed they would be.

Qu'est-ce que vous faites aujourd'hui?
What are you guys up to today?

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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Dormouse559 » 22 Sep 2015 19:42

shimobaatar wrote:Ayer aprendí algo sobre preguntas en francés por la primera vez. Son un poco más complicado que supuse que serían.
Yesterday, I learned something about questions in French for the first time. They're a little more complicated than I assumed they would be.
Ça rend les choses intéressantes.
Keeps things interesting.
[:P]
shimobaatar wrote:Qu'est-ce que vous faites aujourd'hui?
What are you guys up to today?
Euh, pas grand-chose.
Umm, not much.

Je cherche un emploi, mais c'est tout.
I'm looking for a job, but that's it.

Et toi, tu fais quoi aujourd'hui?
And what are you doing today?

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