Other Creativity

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
User avatar
Zekoslav
sinic
sinic
Posts: 336
Joined: 07 Oct 2017 16:54

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Zekoslav » 07 Dec 2019 11:15

That's a very thought out musical instrument and tuning system! I actually started to experiment with just intonation after finding a fully customizable 24-key piano app online, but I never thought of using these "bugs" of 5-limit JI as features!

So the pentatonic scale with one gravetone was D 9/8 E 6/5 G 9/8 A 6/5 C 800/729 D, the one with two gravetones and fourths and fifths made pure again was D 800/729 E 243/200 G 9/8 A 243/200 C 800/729 D. Now I the statement that B was added as a gravetone below A confused me, since in standard scales B comes above A! The heptatonic scale with B added below A (and F added below G) according to your statement would be D 800/729 E 177147/160000 F 800/729 G 6561/6400 B 800/729 A 243/200 C 800/729 D. I find no 535581/500000 semitones in this scale, but I do find a 177147/160000 neutral second and a 6561/6400 quartertone! Placing B a grave tone below C as in standard scales results in no quartertones, rather in a one more 177147/16000 neutral second. The resulting scale has a similar arrangement of small and large steps as the natural minor scale (large, small, large, large, small, large, large), but the two step sizes are much more similar in size, ~160 vs. ~175 cents (except the one between the pure fourth and fifth which is ~200 cents). In any case this is not what you describe. Where did I get this wrong?

EDIT: I wasn't concentrated at all when I was writing this, and the comparison of the heptatonic scale as I understood it to the natural minor scale is not very adequate. If we call the 800/729 tone step A and the 177147/160000 tone step B, then this scale has a lower tetrachord of A B A and the upper tetrachord of B A A, rather like the natural minor scale: in natural minor, step A is a major second and step B a minor second. However, in natural minor step A is larger than step B, while in this scale it's smaller. This, and the fact that steps A and B are much closer in size make it very different from natural minor in all regards other than the A B A and B A A patterns.
Languages:
:hrv: [:D], :bih: :srb: [;)], :eng: [:D], :fra: [:|], :lat: [:(], :deu: [:'(]

A linguistics enthusiast who would like to make a conlang, but can't decide what to call what.

- Tewanian languages
- Guide to Slavic accentuation

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1823
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Salmoneus » 07 Dec 2019 18:46

You didn't.

First: yes, I of course should have said B is a grave tone above A.

More importantly: although, in playing around with the numbers again, I did come up with my ratio again... I'm now not sure how. Because you're obviously right, the remainder should indeed be 177147/160000.


The odder, but fortunate, thing, is that it doesn't seem to matter - I didn't actually use my erroneous remainder anywhere.

I've worked out the actual intervals in the instrument as described (I think!), and the grave tones come out between 157 and 166 cents (would b 157-162 but for one outlier, D-E in the second octave - and, awkwardly, the largest and smallest grave tones are actually adjacent...), and the neutral seconds between 175.7 and 178.1. Four of the octaves are less than a cent and a half out, only two are more than three and a half cents out, and they're all less than five cents out. Both double octaves are less than a cent out. [the two 9:8 seconds come out as 203.78 cents in the lower octave, and 203.65 cents in the upper octaves]

[verdict: better than I feared, maybe not quite as good as I'd like]

User avatar
Zekoslav
sinic
sinic
Posts: 336
Joined: 07 Oct 2017 16:54

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Zekoslav » 07 Dec 2019 19:32

Honestly, I don't think anyone ever named the remainder of 1 perfect fourth minus 2 grave tones (cca 175 cents): it's actually acuter than the grave tone itself (cca 160 cents) but graver than the lesser major second (cca 180 cents), if we got by the grave/acute nomenclature. Both could be classed as neutral seconds according to their size.

The scale as you now correctly describe it has two tetrachords with steps the size of cca 160, 175 and 160 cents. Aurally they're nearly equally spaced and something like that does exist in Middle Eastern and, I think, Georgian music. Actual tuning being slightly off from the mathematically ideal one also gives it a touch of realism, and if you're worried about it being too pungent...

And finding the solution to the problem of the two most unequal grave tones being adjacent sounds like a good challenge for your conculture's music theorists!
Languages:
:hrv: [:D], :bih: :srb: [;)], :eng: [:D], :fra: [:|], :lat: [:(], :deu: [:'(]

A linguistics enthusiast who would like to make a conlang, but can't decide what to call what.

- Tewanian languages
- Guide to Slavic accentuation

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1823
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Salmoneus » 07 Dec 2019 21:25

Zekoslav wrote:
07 Dec 2019 11:15
I actually started to experiment with just intonation after finding a fully customizable 24-key piano app online
Would you mind me asking where?
[/quote]



EDIT: and now me fiddling with the tuning has been delayed by me fiddling with trying to find some soundfonts that don't sound ghastly...

User avatar
Zekoslav
sinic
sinic
Posts: 336
Joined: 07 Oct 2017 16:54

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Zekoslav » 08 Dec 2019 10:53

Here. It synthesizes sound based on frequencies (in Hz, with as many decimal points as you like) you write in the table below the piano app itself.
Languages:
:hrv: [:D], :bih: :srb: [;)], :eng: [:D], :fra: [:|], :lat: [:(], :deu: [:'(]

A linguistics enthusiast who would like to make a conlang, but can't decide what to call what.

- Tewanian languages
- Guide to Slavic accentuation

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1823
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Salmoneus » 08 Dec 2019 17:41

Thanks.

[meanwhile, I found some relevant soundfonts. (though I would like to find a valiha!). But I couldn't load them in musicscore - I needed to update it. So I did that, but then I couldn't open the updated musicscore. Looking up the error message, I realised I needed to update the visual basic c++ thing that windows uses, so I did that. But I couldn't run that updater - very common problem, you need to make sure you have a particular patch. Fine - except that the patch wouldn't work. That, apparently, is very common, and can require one of three or four other patches...

...anyway, while all that was going on, I gave up, came back a bit later, and everything miraculously worked. So now musicscore sounds much, much better than before.]


EDIT: oh, and the upshot is, yes, I'm OK with this tuning system. But I may try to fiddle with the strings a little to reduce the worst irregularities in the instrument.

User avatar
Pabappa
sinic
sinic
Posts: 316
Joined: 18 Nov 2017 02:41
Contact:

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Pabappa » 14 Dec 2019 06:31

I dont consider myself a good poet, ... Ive been dredging up things I wrote long ago, though, so that I dont forget them. Here are the only poems Ive ever written that weren't for a class assignment of some sort:

http://pabappa.com/etc/poems.html
Wapes šempubi.
Please rotate your device.

User avatar
gestaltist
mayan
mayan
Posts: 1820
Joined: 11 Feb 2015 11:23

Re: Other Creativity

Post by gestaltist » 15 Dec 2019 12:46

I love your work on the instrument, Sal. I don't know enough about musical theory to reproduce your process but just enough to get what you're talking about and be amazed you went to all these lengths to produce something realistic [:D]

User avatar
Zekoslav
sinic
sinic
Posts: 336
Joined: 07 Oct 2017 16:54

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Zekoslav » 15 Dec 2019 16:26

gestaltist wrote:
15 Dec 2019 12:46
I love your work on the instrument, Sal. I don't know enough about musical theory to reproduce your process but just enough to get what you're talking about and be amazed you went to all these lengths to produce something realistic [:D]
I'd love to be able to build an instrument. When I found out that I have enough skills in music theory to accurately calculate fret positions for my desired tuning, I got enthusiastic, but then I found out that I have no carpentry skills (and carpentry tools) to actually make it!
Languages:
:hrv: [:D], :bih: :srb: [;)], :eng: [:D], :fra: [:|], :lat: [:(], :deu: [:'(]

A linguistics enthusiast who would like to make a conlang, but can't decide what to call what.

- Tewanian languages
- Guide to Slavic accentuation

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1823
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Salmoneus » 16 Dec 2019 01:06

Zekoslav wrote:
15 Dec 2019 16:26
gestaltist wrote:
15 Dec 2019 12:46
I love your work on the instrument, Sal. I don't know enough about musical theory to reproduce your process but just enough to get what you're talking about and be amazed you went to all these lengths to produce something realistic [:D]
I'd love to be able to build an instrument. When I found out that I have enough skills in music theory to accurately calculate fret positions for my desired tuning, I got enthusiastic, but then I found out that I have no carpentry skills (and carpentry tools) to actually make it!
Yes, it's sad. There are many fascinating things one could do with wind instruments, in particular - but doing them requires a combination of musical knowledge, acoustic and mathematical knowledge, AND the skills and equipment to work finely in wood (or other materials). Which I guess is a big part of why there are so many unexplored or underutilised avenues still.


However: if you're talking about a guitar, surely it's not that difficult? Frets can (cross-culturally!) be made of string, or wax, or just a small nail, which should be doable for a motivated layman without any great skill or equipment. A bigger challenge would be removing existing frets... but, assuming you can't just start with a fretless instrument (and OK, any unusual instrument is probably unfeasibly expensive!), and that you're not willing/able to file down the existing frets, what probably IS possible is to just obviate the existing frets by raising the plane of the strings. You can raise the bridge and/or nut, or just put some additional obstacle ABOVE the bridge and/or nut (though you may end up with a little unintentional sawari if you're not careful). That raises the strings enough for the frets to not matter, and then you can add your own frets - maybe something like a strip of hard putty with a metal string to form the edge?

[actually, if you put your frets in higher than the existing frets, you may not even need to raise the strings? there's probably room?]

To do this properly, if you raised the strings you'd also have to slacken the strings slightly (to compensate for the increased coupling), but for amateur exploratory purposes I wouldn't think the timbre change would matter that much...



----------


gestaltist: thank you!

User avatar
Zekoslav
sinic
sinic
Posts: 336
Joined: 07 Oct 2017 16:54

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Zekoslav » 16 Dec 2019 10:49

There's actually tons of tutorials on how to make your own guitar on the Internet, so it's really mostly the lack of proper tools which is preventing me to do it (tinkering with an existing guitar as you proposed is possible but I'd rather not break it any further than I already have while playing with the tuning pegs as a child...).
Languages:
:hrv: [:D], :bih: :srb: [;)], :eng: [:D], :fra: [:|], :lat: [:(], :deu: [:'(]

A linguistics enthusiast who would like to make a conlang, but can't decide what to call what.

- Tewanian languages
- Guide to Slavic accentuation

User avatar
gach
MVP
MVP
Posts: 725
Joined: 07 Aug 2013 01:26
Location: displaced from Helsinki

Re: Other Creativity

Post by gach » 20 Dec 2019 16:20

Zekoslav wrote:
16 Dec 2019 10:49
There's actually tons of tutorials on how to make your own guitar on the Internet, so it's really mostly the lack of proper tools which is preventing me to do it (tinkering with an existing guitar as you proposed is possible but I'd rather not break it any further than I already have while playing with the tuning pegs as a child...).
The way I'd go about this would be to buy a cheap sacrificial guitar to experiment on. That way you won't be making too big of a loss if you end up destroying it. As far as I'm aware, guitar frets are never glued on the fingerboard, so with appropriate care it shouldn't be too tricky to knock them up and out starting from the edge. Then I'd probably start first with improvised movable frets instead of directly committing to new fixed fret positions. In any case, something like ~1 mm diameter brass wire strikes me as fairly decent fret material and the most straightforward way of fixing that on the guitar neck would be to simply tie it around in a tight loop. Then it's up to you how far you want to refine this. Maybe the first refinement to think about would be to use strips of thin leather or fabric around the wire so you won't hurt your hand on the underside of the neck while playing.

Another reason for preferring movable frets, besides the freedom of experimentation, is that you'll probable want to rely on your ears as well as the maths for getting the intonation right. In school we had a guitar building course and during it our woodwork teacher strongly advised us against making our own fretboards in case we made a mistake in the fret positions and ended up with wonky intonation.
ImageKištaLkal sikSeic

Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 1823
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Salmoneus » 20 Dec 2019 21:00

It also depends what sort of guitar - or at least, what sort of strings. Gut- (/nylon-)strung instruments traditionally used gut frets - it's only when metal, or metal-overwound strings became common that gut frets fell out of use (because the string cuts through the frets). If you're playing around with a nylong-strung instrument with relatively low tensions - like a cheap kid's starter guitar - then you may not need brass wire, you may be able just to use nylon (which I assume is cheaper? I've never bought strings...)

String frets also let you use the same guitar for several different temperaments. Perhaps consult viol websites for guides on how best to attach the fret for reliability and flexibility?

Khemehekis
runic
runic
Posts: 2536
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Khemehekis » 31 Dec 2019 09:07

I have put my essay on bixochromatism, "On Choice, Punishment, and the Color of Lipstick" (which was already up on my Khemehekis Angelfire site) up on my blog:

https://savegraduation.tumblr.com/post/ ... f-lipstick
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 62,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 820
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Tanni » 07 Feb 2020 09:58

I've started to translate my story "Hexe Thekla und der Glücksdrache" (Witch Thekla and the dragon of fortune). This is actually a children's stroy, which is part of another book I write about LaTeX for authors. It's used there as an example story. I've not yet translated the titles.

Even though I know that some don't like markup in the text, I'll provide the (somewhat shortened) LaTeX source text, so it also can be seen as an example on how a source text looks like when using LaTeX. Ok, it acutally could also look quite differently, that's just my style. Here is an explanation of some of the commands used in the text:

\newcommand{\putstar}{\centered{$\ast$}}

This puts an asterisk (the character *) in the middle of a page or a column. The dollar sign switches the math mode on and off, in which the command \ast is used to get the asterisk. The (user-defined) command \centered puts the asterisk in the center, as already described.

\newcommand{\mysection}[1]
{
\addtocounter{titlecounter}{1}
% \centered{-- \arabic{titlecounter} --}
% \centered{-- \textbf{\arabic{titlecounter}} --}
\centered{$\prec$ \textbf{\arabic{titlecounter}} $\succ$}
% \centered{-- \textbf{\roman{titlecounter}} --}
% \centered{-- \textbf{\Roman{titlecounter}} --}
% \centered{-- \textbf{\alph{titlecounter}} --}
% \centered{-- \textbf{\Alph{titlecounter}} --}
}

Normally, you use the command \section{...} to typeset a section title, to enumerate it correctly and to make an entry in the table of content. With the command \mysection{...}, it is possible to have self-designed section titles. The source provides several possibilities, all of them commented out, barring the third one. \prec and \succ are mathematical symbols similar to < and >

\newcommand{\source}[1]{}

This command just deletes the (German) source text from the PDF. So you can have the story text in the source and in the destination language in one file, but get rid of the source language text while generating the PDF file.

\flqq and \frqq make French quotation marks.
\glqq and \grqq make German quotation marks.


\mysection{Die Reise ins Ungewisse}


\begin{comment}

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreispitz

Der Dreispitz scheint das Ergebnis einer Entwicklung
vom runden Hut mit breiter Krempe der spanischen Soldaten
(Achtzigjähriger Krieg und Reunionskrieg (1683–1684))
zum Zwecke eines besseren Schutzes
gegenüber den Witterungsverhältnissen in Flandern
während des 17. Jahrhunderts zu sein,
bei dem die Krempe zuerst auf einer Seite,
dann rundum auf drei Seiten hochgeschlagen wurde.[1]
Durch das Hochschlagen der Hutränder erhielt man eine dreieckige Form,
sodass der Regen an den Ecken ablaufen konnte. ...

\end{comment}


\source
{
An Bord
empfing sie ein
Fuchs
in der roten Uniform eines Kapitäns.
Auf dem Kopf trug er einen Dreispitz mit einer langen Feder.
}

On board she was welcomed by a fox in the red uniform of a captain.
He wore a tricorne with a long feather.

% Segelschiff \flqq\,Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve\,\frqq

\source
{
% ''Willkommen an Bord der \flq\,Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve\,\frq!'',
%! In Frankreich sind halbe Anführungszeichen unüblich!
''Willkommen an Bord der \flqq\,Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve\,\frqq!'',
sagte er,
verbeugte sich und zog gleichzeitig
% verbeugte sich \textbf{tief} und zog gleichzeitig
% seinen Dreispitz
seinen Hut
vom Kopf.
\flqq\,Je suis capitaine Rémy\,!\,\frqq
}

%Leo: vor jmdm. den Hut ziehen [fig. ] = to take one's hat off to so. [fig. ]

''Welcome on board the vessel \flqq\,Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve\,\frqq!'',
he said,
% bowed down and lifted his hat from his head.
bowed down and took his hat off to the girl.
\flqq\,Je suis capitaine Rémy\,!\,\frqq

\source
{
\glqq{}Hallo!\grqq{} antwortete Thekla, die nicht wußte,
was sie sonst sagen sollte.
Sie sah sich um.
Es gab Wölfe in Matrosenuniformen und große Spinnen,
die offenbar auf die Befehle ihres Kapitäns warteten.
\glqq{}Ich heiße Thekla\grqq{} erwiderte sie schließlich,
wohl wissend, daß ihr Name nicht so gut klang wie der
des Käpitäns.
}

\glqq{}Hi!\grqq{} Thekla answered,
as she didn't know what else to say.
She looked around.
There were wolves in sailor uniforms,
and spiders, who obviously waited for the orders of their captain.
\glqq{}My name is Thekla\grqq{} she responded eventually,
knowing that her name doesn't sound as well as the name of the captain.

\source
{
''Setzt die Segel, wir fahren los!''
befahl dieser.
%? Muß man in die Wanten klettern, um Segel zu setzen?
% befahl dieser, und die Spinnen kletterten in die Wanten.
%
%!wp: Die Wanten stützen einen Mast oder eine Stenge
%!wp: hauptsächlich querschiffs zu beiden Seiten,
%!wp: je nach Bauart aber auch mehr oder weniger nach achtern.
%!wp: ... Auf älteren Großseglern ab dem späten Mittelalter
%!wp: sind zwischen den Wanten Webleinen zum Besteigen des Mastes
%!wp: befestigt.
%
% Bald fielen die Segel und blähten sich im Wind.
% Die Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve nahm Fahrt auf.
Bald blähten sich die Segel im Wind,
und die Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve nahm Fahrt auf.
}

% Segel setzen
% https://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolved ... en&lp=ende
% aufgeblähtes Segel
% https://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolved ... en&lp=ende

%Leo: Fahrt aufnehmen = to gather way [NAUT.]

% ''Hoist the sails, we start!'' he commanded.
''Set sails, we start!'' he commanded.
Soon, the sails billowed in the wind,
and the Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve gathered way.

\putstar

\source
{
Einer der Wolfsmatrosen führte sie im Schiff herum
und erklärte ihr alles.
So erfuhr sie, daß sich die Spinnen um die Segel
kümmerten: sollten sie beschädigt werden, so konnten
sie sie mit ihrer Spinnenseide reparieren.
Gegen Abend wurde es kalt, und alle gingen unter Deck.
% Einige Wiesel trugen einen großen Topf herein
Einige Wiesel schleppten einen großen Topf herein
und stellten ihn zwischen den Spinnen ab.
}

%Leo: jmdn. herumführen = to show so. round
%Leo: unter Deck gehen = to go below [NAUT.]
%Leo: stoat [ZOOL.] = Großes Wiesel -- wiss.: Mustela erminea
%Leo: to tow sth. -- towed, towed = etw. schleppen

% One of the wulf sailors showed her round in the ship
% and explained her everything.
One of the wulf sailors showed her around the ship
and explained everything to her.
% This way, she learned that the spiders cared about the sails:
% in case they would be damaged, the spiders would repair them
% with their silk.
This way, she learned that the spiders
who in size reached the girl's chest
cared about the sails:
in case they would be damaged, the spiders would repair them
with their silk.
It became cold in the evening, and everybody went below.
Some of the stoats towed in a huge pot
and placed it amongst the spiders.

\source
{
''Wir haben unsere Ernährung umgestellt'',
sagte eine der Spinnen, die Thekla bis zur Brust reichte,
''für uns gibt es nicht genug Insekten,
nur durch Griesbrei konnten wir so groß werden''.
}

%Leo: die Ernährungsweise = nutrition

''We've changed our nutrition'',
% one of the spiders said,
one of the spiders explained,
''there are not enough insects, only with semolina we could
grow as high as we are.''

\source
{
''Und durch Himbeersaft!'' fügte eine andere Spinne hinzu.
}

%Leo: Himbeersaft = raspberry juice

''And with raspberry juice!'' another spider added.

\source
{
Glücklicherweise brachten die Wiesel noch Löffel,
so daß sie beobachten konnte,
% wie die Wölfe die Spinnen fütterten.
wie Wölfe und Wiesel die Spinnen fütterten.
Ganz schön schwierig, wenn die Löffel zwischen
den Krallen gehalten werden mußten.
% Thekla half den Wölfen, die Spinnen zu füttern.
% Thekla half, die Spinnen zu füttern.
}

%Leo: to find -- found, found = beobachten

Luckily, the stoats also brought spoons,
so that the girl could find the wulves and weasels
feeding the spiders.
This was quite difficult, as the spoons had to be kept
between their claws.

\source
{
''Darf ich die Spinnen füttern'' bot sich das Mädchen an,
''mit meinen Händen geht das besser als mit euren Pfoten.''
}

''May I feed the spiders'', the girl offered her help,
''with my hands, it's much easier than with your paws''.

\source
{
Und so lernte Thekla durch die Fütterung jede der Spinnen kennen.
Sie konnten gleichzeitig essen und sprechen, denn neben dem Mund
zum Essen hatte jede Spinne auf der rechten und linken Vorderseite
des Hinterleibs je einen Sprechmund.
}

%Leo: auf diese Art und Weise = in this way
%Leo: auf diese Art und Weise = in this vein

%Leo jmdn./etw. kennenlernen = to become acquainted with so./sth.

% In this vein, by feeding the spiders,
% Thekla became acquainted with all of the spiders.
% In this vein, by feeding the them,
% Thekla became acquainted with all of the spiders.
% In this vein, by feeding the spiders,
% Thekla became acquainted with all of them.
% So, by feeding the spiders,
% Thekla became acquainted with all of them.
So, by feeding them,
Thekla became acquainted with all of the spiders.
They could eat and speak simultaneously, as besides the mouth
for eating, they had a mouth for speaking on the right and the left
front of their opisthosoma, respectively.

\putstar

\source
{
''Komm, lege dich zu uns'', forderten sie die Spinnen auf,
''du kannst uns die Nacht über wärmen.''
}

''Come on, lay down beside us'', the spiders invited her,
''you may warm us during the night.''

\source
{
Das ließ sich Thekla nicht zweimal sagen,
denn sie mochte Spinnen.
Es war schön,
daß diese so groß waren
% und sie mit ihnen sprechen konnte.
und sie sich mit ihnen unterhalten konnte.
}

%Leo: Das ließ er sich nicht zweimal sagen. = He didn't need to be told twice.
%Leo: sich (mit jemandem) unterhalten = to converse (with so.)

Thekla didn't need to be told twice, as she liked spiders.
It was wonderful that they were that tall
and that she could converse with them.

\putstar

\source
{
Thekla kam an Deck, als die Sonne im Meer versank.
Es war kalt.
Die Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve war schon ziemlich weit nach Norden vorgedrungen.
Der Kapitän befahl, die Segel zu reffen.
Das Schiff wurde langsamer.
}

%Leo: die Segel reffen = to shorten sails [NAUT.]

Thekla came on deck as the sun sat into the sea.
It was cold.
The Ge"|ne"|viè"|ve already advanced very far into the north.
The captain commanded to shorten sails.
The ship became slower.

\source
{
''Wir warten auf einen Zeppelin, mit dem du weiterfahren wirst.''
sagte der Kapitän.
}

''We wait for a zeppelin. You will go on with that airship''
the captain said.

\source
{
% Thekla sah ein rotes und ein grünes Licht.
Am Himmel sah Thekla dicht nebeneinander
ein rotes und ein grünes Licht.
% Es waren die Positionslampen des Zeppelins.
''Was ist das?'' fragte sie verwundert.
}

In the sky, Thekla saw a red and a green light
close beside each other.

\source
{
''Das sind die Positionslampen des Zeppelins''
erklärte eine der auf dem Deck anwesenden Spinnen.
}

%Leo: die Positionslampe = navigation light [NAUT.]
%Leo: to explicate = ausführen, erläutern, erklären

''These are the navigation lights of the dirigible''
one of the attendant spiders explicated.

\source
{
%! der Zeppelin
% Als der Zeppelin über dem Schiff stand,
Als sich der Zeppelin über dem Schiff befand,
wurde eine Strickleiter heruntergeworfen.
% Das Mädchen kletterte hinauf.
Das Mädchen verabschiedete sich
von den Wölfen, den Spinnen, den Wieseln und vom Kapitän
und kletterte hinauf.
}

%Leo: to take leave of so. [form.] = sich von jmdm. verabschieden

%Leo: Großes Wiesel -- wiss.: Mustela erminea = ermine [ZOOL.]

As the zeppelin stood above the sailing ship,
a rope ladder was thrown down.
The girl took leave of the wolves, the spiders, the ermines
and the captain and climbed up.


\mysection{Der Zeppelin}


\source
{
An Bord des Zeppelins begrüßte sie ein uniformierter Polarfuchs.
Auch hier gab es große Spinnen, die als Matrosen dienten.
% Der Zeppelin nahm Kurs auf einen hohen Berg in der Ferne.
Der Zeppelin stieg auf und nahm Kurs Nordnordost.
}

%Leo: jmdn. begrüßen = to receive so. -- a visitor

%Leo: Arctic (or: arctic) fox [ZOOL.] = der Polarfuchs Lat.: Alopex lagopus
%Leo: white fox [ZOOL.] = der Polarfuchs wiss.: Alopex lagopus

% https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardinal_direction
% north-northeast (NNE)

On board of the zeppelin, she was received by an uniformed arctic fox.
There were tall spiders, too, who served as sailors.
The dirigible ascended and set course north-northeast.

\source
{
''Die Spinnen klettern auf den Zeppelin und dichten mit ihrer
Spinnenseide eventuelle Löcher ab'', erklärte der Kapitän,
''Wölfe und Wiesel könnten das nicht, sie würden mit ihren Pfoten
die Hülle zerreißen.''
}

%Leo: etw. abdichten = to tighten sth. -- tightened, tightened

% https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airship#Envelope

''The spiders climb on the zeppelin and tighten possible holes
with there spider silk'', the captain explained,
''wolves and weasels cannot do this, as they would damage the
envelope with their paws.''

\source
{
''Darf ich fragen, wohin die Reise geht?'' wandte sich Thekla
an den Polarfuchs.
}

%Leo: to approach so. -- approached, approached = sich an jmdn. wenden

''May I ask you where our voyage goes?''
Thekla approached the white fox.

\source
{
''Du bist vom Glückdrachen eingeladen worden,
% der auf dem Berg in einer Höhle wohnt.''
der auf diesem Berg in einer Höhle wohnt.''
% antwortete der Kapitän des Luftschiffs
antwortete der Kapitän
und zeigte auf einen großen Berggipfel,
% der auf dem Kurs des Luftschiffs lag.
auf den das Luftschiff zusteuerte.
}

%Leo: mountaintop or: mountain top = der Berggipfel pl.: die Berggipfel

%Leo: to bear down on so./sth. = auf jmdn./etw. zusteuern

''You are invited by the dragon of fortune,
who lives on this mountain in a cave.''
the captain replied and pointed to a huge mountaintop
the airship just bore down on.

\putstar

\source
{
Der Zeppelin näherte sich dem schneebedeckten Boden.
Thekla verließ das Luftschiff über dieselbe Strickleiter,
% über die sie das Schiff erreicht hatte.
% über die sie auf das Zeppelin gekommen war.
über die sie an Bord gekommen war.
}

%Leo: an Bord gehen = to go aboard

The airship approached the snow-covered soil.
Thekla left the zeppelin using the same rope ladder
she went aboard.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.

User avatar
vampireshark
sinic
sinic
Posts: 308
Joined: 20 Jan 2012 15:51
Location: Luxembourg (LU); occasionally North Carolina (US)
Contact:

Re: Other Creativity

Post by vampireshark » 13 Feb 2020 00:49

I got bored.
Image
And I'll dance with you in Vienna,
I'll be wearing a river's disguise;
The hyacinth wild on my shoulder,
My mouth on the dew of your thigh...

Looking for subjects to appear on banknotes. Inquire within.

Khemehekis
runic
runic
Posts: 2536
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Khemehekis » 13 Feb 2020 04:55

Tanni wrote:
07 Feb 2020 09:58
I've started to translate my story "Hexe Thekla und der Glücksdrache" (Witch Thekla and the dragon of fortune). This is actually a children's stroy, which is part of another book I write about LaTeX for authors. It's used there as an example story. I've not yet translated the titles.
Oh, that was such a cool story! It's classic Tanni the way you have those conversations with animals who in many ways act like animals instead of being completely anthropomorphized. As we learned in grade school English class, this is one of three types of animal stories: animals that act like animals but talk like people. Charlotte's Web, by E. B. White, would be an example of this type of story. (The other two types are "animals that act like animals" and "animals that act like people".)

Is a wulf a wolf? (Even though the English pronunciation has the same vowel as "full", we spell it with an O, just like German.)
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 62,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

User avatar
Ossicone
moderator
moderator
Posts: 3706
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 05:20
Location: I've heard it both ways.
Contact:

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Ossicone » 20 Feb 2020 22:13

Check out my dnd map

https://i.imgur.com/rjnLGiK.png

User avatar
cedh
MVP
MVP
Posts: 379
Joined: 07 Sep 2011 22:25
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Contact:

Re: Other Creativity

Post by cedh » 21 Feb 2020 08:39

Ossicone wrote:
20 Feb 2020 22:13
Check out my dnd map

https://i.imgur.com/rjnLGiK.png
Nice. (Except that the river near Ull looks a bit strange, it seems to go uphill in the first half of its course...)

User avatar
Ossicone
moderator
moderator
Posts: 3706
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 05:20
Location: I've heard it both ways.
Contact:

Re: Other Creativity

Post by Ossicone » 21 Feb 2020 09:26

cedh wrote:
21 Feb 2020 08:39
Ossicone wrote:
20 Feb 2020 22:13
Check out my dnd map

https://i.imgur.com/rjnLGiK.png
Nice. (Except that the river near Ull looks a bit strange, it seems to go uphill in the first half of its course...)

Ah man, you’re right.
I was updating an old map that had some rivers but no mountains and it just slipped by.

Post Reply