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Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 24 Apr 2019 00:03
by sangi39
Got a fair bit of work done on the large church-like building in the central bailey done today after finishing work:

Image

I've intentionally gone heavily overboard on the flying buttresses, since I think it gives it a more... industrial(?) look. Like, from a certain perspective it looks almost like a factory.

I'm also trying my best to stick with some sort of architectural "realism", so no floating walls for internal areas that are higher up that the external parts, which meant that the central spire for that "church" now looks like this when viewed from inside and directly at the centre:

Image

Which I really, really like.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 24 Apr 2019 01:03
by Reyzadren
^Looks like the exterior hallway of a scifi prison spaceship lol [xD]

Still impressive though.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 24 Apr 2019 03:47
by sangi39
Reyzadren wrote:
24 Apr 2019 01:03
^Looks like the exterior hallway of a scifi prison spaceship lol [xD]

Still impressive though.
I am so okay with that! [:D]

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 30 Apr 2019 20:18
by sangi39
So managed to complete a section that I'm considering a sort of "bailey of the nobility". There are eight buildings which are inspired mostly by the Roman domus, which would act as residences for eight noble families when they spend time in the city (although I suspect only "immediate" family). Each residence has four bedrooms, a few kitchen areas, storage areas to the rear, a dining area, a washroom/toilet, a separate room to house several personal bodyguards (I think I made room for eight in each residence), with the central area being open for receiving guests.

Image

The two walled off areas towards the front of the image are 1) a military area on the left, and 2) an area to house the servants for each noble residence.

The military area houses ten soldiers, as well as the two servants assigned to them, with another building, divided in two between a cooking/mess area and a bathing area. There's then two sets of stables with room for five horses each, and structures built to hold their food.

The houses in the servants' area are pretty basic, being a single room with a fireplace, room for storage, eight beds, and then a separate "out house".



Overall, the map is coming up to be about half-full, with lots still to do, lol:

Image

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 22 May 2019 00:17
by vampireshark
I made these recently. (Yay for playing around with a slowly-developing language.)
Image

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 22 May 2019 01:55
by elemtilas
vampireshark wrote:
22 May 2019 00:17
I made these recently. (Yay for playing around with a slowly-developing language.)
Spoiler:
Image
Curious:

What is the rationale (if you know!) why they would have a 3 denomination rather than a 2 1/2? Is there some historical reason? 2 1/2 would seem to make more sense given the existence of 1/2, 5, 10, 20, 50 as it will evenly go into all the denominations above (plus, in addition with a 1/2, would make 3, if there was some quirk of history making that denomination useful).

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 22 May 2019 14:33
by vampireshark
elemtilas wrote:
22 May 2019 01:55
vampireshark wrote:
22 May 2019 00:17
I made these recently. (Yay for playing around with a slowly-developing language.)
Spoiler:
Image
Curious:

What is the rationale (if you know!) why they would have a 3 denomination rather than a 2 1/2? Is there some historical reason? 2 1/2 would seem to make more sense given the existence of 1/2, 5, 10, 20, 50 as it will evenly go into all the denominations above (plus, in addition with a 1/2, would make 3, if there was some quirk of history making that denomination useful).
Currency-specific, the ordinary pyew is issued in coins of 0.05, 0.25, and 1 pyew (one pyew is divided into 20 ni) and banknotes of 3, 5, 20, and 100 pyew. The reason for the FEC 3 note is because there's an ordinary OSP 3 note. A thing to note is that these are foreign exchange certificates, not ordinary banknotes (and coins), so there are peculiarities in terms of there being more denominations to "facilitate" foreign trade. (There aren't ordinary 0.50 and 1 pyew notes, for example.)

Interestingly (to me, because MONEY), this an attested denomination structure in several currencies (eg. the Cuban peso convertible, the Tajikistani somoni, and the Bahamian dollar). Not sure why exactly, but there is/was real-world inspiration.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 22 May 2019 17:31
by elemtilas
vampireshark wrote:
22 May 2019 14:33
Interestingly (to me, because MONEY), this an attested denomination structure in several currencies (eg. the Cuban peso convertible, the Tajikistani somoni, and the Bahamian dollar). Not sure why exactly, but there is/was real-world inspiration.
The US dollar as well: we had 3c and $3 coins at one time (along with 2c and $2.50 coins). It's quite possible the US had those denominations to facilitate the purchase of postage stamps whose rate at the time was 3c.

Bahamas's $3 note seems to have come about around the time of independence and decimalisation, the exchange rate being approximately $3 to the pound.

Russia and later the USSR also had 3 kopek & 3 ruble denominations.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 30 May 2019 09:23
by Lambuzhao
Sort of in the same geographic area, but for completely different reasons, looked for some tategaki (vertical script) natlang road signs.

Found this on Deviantart:

https://www.deviantart.com/kyuzoaoi/art ... -632998090

[<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3] [<3]

I am a sucker for that Manchu/Old Mongolian script! [:P]

OMG, then I google image-searched "Mongolian Calligraphy"

[O.O] :!:
Have you ever‽‽⸮

I could just plotz!!!

PS:

Is there or isn't there, a Greekish-Romish root equivalent for tategaki, à la boustrophedon?

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 07 Jun 2019 18:04
by sangi39
elemtilas wrote:
22 May 2019 17:31
vampireshark wrote:
22 May 2019 14:33
Interestingly (to me, because MONEY), this an attested denomination structure in several currencies (eg. the Cuban peso convertible, the Tajikistani somoni, and the Bahamian dollar). Not sure why exactly, but there is/was real-world inspiration.
The US dollar as well: we had 3c and $3 coins at one time (along with 2c and $2.50 coins). It's quite possible the US had those denominations to facilitate the purchase of postage stamps whose rate at the time was 3c.

Bahamas's $3 note seems to have come about around the time of independence and decimalisation, the exchange rate being approximately $3 to the pound.

Russia and later the USSR also had 3 kopek & 3 ruble denominations.
IIRC, here in the UK we also had 3 pence coins, 4 pence coins and 6 pence coins, but no 5 pence coins. This, though was the result of the pre-decimal pound being divided into 20 shillings with a value of 12 pence each, or 240 pence in total, so while 5 is a divisor of 240 (1/48th), it isn't a divisor of 12, so it wasn't a natural denomination for the shilling. The 5 pence coin was introduced in the run-up to decimalisation, though, since at 1/20th of 1 pound it was due to take over for the shilling. After that, we scrapped the 3 pence, 4 pence and 6 pence coins, since they weren't there as a divisor of anything any more (as well the crown, half-crown, and florin for similar reasons (they would have been 25p, 12.5p and 6.25p in the new system, although apparently 25p coins have been minted since decimalisation, but not meant for circulation), while the 10 shilling note was swapped out for the 50p coin.

I assume the 2p coin was kept, and by extension the 20p coin was made, for mathsy reasons (maybe something like the fewest number of coins of different denominations needed to make up the various values less than £1?)

Actually, I'd be interested in seeing how many decimal currencies use things like a 3/100th or 30/100th denomination of its unit currency, and whether there's a reason behind that other than that's the system they adopted under influence of some other culture.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 07 Jun 2019 18:59
by sangi39
Haven't had much of a chance to do much with this project, but tore down two of the larger structures, and filling in the gaps:

Image

The large temple structure that was in the bottom-right has been taken out and I'm planning on making the entire "southern" bailey (I say "southern", I think that's actually to the west, but oh well) more of a militarised centre, with a two military hospitals (there's the beginnings of one in the updated map, which, I think, has about 170 beds in it), and then a fairly large training ground to the eastern end of the bailey where larger manoeuvres can be practices, as well as horse-riding, long-distance archery, etc.

The church building that was in the northern half of the central bailey has also come down now, replacing it instead with a sort of "administrative district", with a building in the north-western corner where the monarch and the head of the eight noble families, as well as, I suppose, elected representatives (I think it was 14) can meet, another building in the north-eastern corner which would be a centre for taxation and distribution of resources for the city as a whole (dealing with how much has been brought into the city, how much each household will get depending on status, needs and any future storage for winter months, etc.), and then I'd think the regions to the south of those structures would be, say, a public forum and a central market area respectively.

I've also formalised the military sections, with each "squad" building housing 10 soldiers and 2 servants/slaves, each squad then has access to a bath house and mess hall, as well as their own blacksmith (which includes accommodation for the blacksmith and a servant/slave/apprentice of their own who helps them with work, cleaning, cooking, etc.), store houses, and stables. The small garrison in the southern section of the central bailey, while still containing enough space for a squad, only includes space for a bath house, mess room and stables, and I'm thinking that's because this wouldn't actually be a typical "squad", but sort of a combined mish-mash made up of various military leadership ranks within the city, assembled during "state events".

That does mean, though, that I need to move the city's main religious centre, but I might go for something smaller and then have a lot of smaller chapels spread out across the city.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 08 Jun 2019 02:54
by LinguistCat
Image

More of a hands on project. I'm making little bottle charms. Hoping to sell them online but I need to look into stuff like Etsy a bit more.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 08 Jun 2019 05:00
by elemtilas
LinguistCat wrote:
08 Jun 2019 02:54
Image

More of a hands on project. I'm making little bottle charms. Hoping to sell them online but I need to look into stuff like Etsy a bit more.
Nifty!

What kinds of things will you put in the bottles?

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 08 Jun 2019 15:56
by LinguistCat
elemtilas wrote:
08 Jun 2019 05:00
LinguistCat wrote:
08 Jun 2019 02:54
Image

More of a hands on project. I'm making little bottle charms. Hoping to sell them online but I need to look into stuff like Etsy a bit more.
Nifty!

What kinds of things will you put in the bottles?
Mostly small pieces of gemstones since I don't need to preserve them in any way and, if I don't know what they're supposed to "represent", I can find out easily. Anything like plants are harder. The resin should keep them from degrading somewhat, but I'd have to test it to be sure and I wouldn't be happy if they easily got stuck in ways I couldn't fix.

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 08 Jun 2019 19:22
by vampireshark
sangi39 wrote:
07 Jun 2019 18:04
elemtilas wrote:
22 May 2019 17:31
vampireshark wrote:
22 May 2019 14:33
Interestingly (to me, because MONEY), this an attested denomination structure in several currencies (eg. the Cuban peso convertible, the Tajikistani somoni, and the Bahamian dollar). Not sure why exactly, but there is/was real-world inspiration.
The US dollar as well: we had 3c and $3 coins at one time (along with 2c and $2.50 coins). It's quite possible the US had those denominations to facilitate the purchase of postage stamps whose rate at the time was 3c.

Bahamas's $3 note seems to have come about around the time of independence and decimalisation, the exchange rate being approximately $3 to the pound.

Russia and later the USSR also had 3 kopek & 3 ruble denominations.
IIRC, here in the UK we also had 3 pence coins, 4 pence coins and 6 pence coins, but no 5 pence coins. This, though was the result of the pre-decimal pound being divided into 20 shillings with a value of 12 pence each, or 240 pence in total, so while 5 is a divisor of 240 (1/48th), it isn't a divisor of 12, so it wasn't a natural denomination for the shilling. The 5 pence coin was introduced in the run-up to decimalisation, though, since at 1/20th of 1 pound it was due to take over for the shilling. After that, we scrapped the 3 pence, 4 pence and 6 pence coins, since they weren't there as a divisor of anything any more (as well the crown, half-crown, and florin for similar reasons (they would have been 25p, 12.5p and 6.25p in the new system, although apparently 25p coins have been minted since decimalisation, but not meant for circulation), while the 10 shilling note was swapped out for the 50p coin.

I assume the 2p coin was kept, and by extension the 20p coin was made, for mathsy reasons (maybe something like the fewest number of coins of different denominations needed to make up the various values less than £1?)

Actually, I'd be interested in seeing how many decimal currencies use things like a 3/100th or 30/100th denomination of its unit currency, and whether there's a reason behind that other than that's the system they adopted under influence of some other culture.
Well, the UK still does have 3- and 4-pence coins (though as semi-commemorative Maundy money), but that's a legacy of pre-decimalization. Actually, pre-decimal, the UK didn't commonly use 2d coins: the structure went 1d, 3d, and 6d before going into shillings. There are, indeed, 25 pence coins that are commemoratives, like pre-decimal crowns, but they fell into disfavor in the 90s and got replaced by £5 coins as the Crown denomination. Also, florin and shilling coins were valid as 10p and 5p, respectively, until the resizing in the 90s (and 6d coins until the mid-eighties with the withdrawal of the decimal halfpenny).
Spoiler:
Maundy Money, because money.Image
Upon decimalization, the UK used 0.5p, 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, and 50p coins, with 20p coins introduced in the 80's. (Part of why I had a lot of them dated from '82!)

Indeed, the 3-cent coins in the US were for postage, though those denominations fell out of use long ago. Russia and the USSR... probably a legacy of pre-decimalization, and, indeed, the Bahamas' $3 was roughly equal to £1 upon decimalization (which is why the Bahamas also uses a 15 cent coin, since that was roughly equal to a shilling).

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 01:28
by Lambuzhao
Two things. Not mine, but very inspiring [:D]

First: Twitterer Monarobot made a gorgeous mayan glyph for the King of Kaiju:

https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1135167495571218432

Wow! I [<3] this :!:

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 01:31
by Lambuzhao
I don't recall if I posted this somewhere already.
I was looking for STOP signs that have vertical text.
I found this:
https://www.deviantart.com/kyuzoaoi/art ... -632998090

Just singular and beautiful!
[:O]

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 01:35
by Lambuzhao
Good Lord! This Monarobot has even done up Bulba/Venusaur in Mayan style:
https://twitter.com/monarobot/status/10 ... 9689057281

Is there anything this Monarobot cannot do?!
[O.o]

{scrolls down, finds Mayan version of Aku from Samurai Jack}

[<3] [>_<] [<3]

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 18 Jun 2019 03:19
by Reyzadren
The summary song for my 3rd album, which has bits and pieces of all songs from the album to form 1 cohesive but simple track: Deep Exploration (Genre: Soundtrack)

Youtube: Deep Exploration
Soundcloud: Deep Exploration

Re: Other Creativity

Posted: 23 Jun 2019 16:50
by Zekoslav
Here's a map of that world I asked climate questions about recently, made with the help of GPlates, Print Screen and Paint:

Image

It has four continents:

Australia, a Gondwana-sized supercontinent in the Southern Hemisphere

Borealia, a North America-sized continent in the Northern Hemisphere

Aridia, an (Earth's) Australia-sized continent which I hope really will turn out to be arid (the southeast might end up humid subtropical)

Humidia, a Europe-sized continent which I hope really will turn out to be humid (the north might end up mediterranean)

As it turns out this world has quite a lot of areas which could have a mediterranean-style semi-arid coastal climate...