You

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
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DesEsseintes
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Re: You

Post by DesEsseintes » 28 Mar 2015 02:18

Prinsessa wrote:someone's location is a factor in whether you like them?
Yes.

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Re: You

Post by sestir » 28 Mar 2015 19:08

You may wish to call it a parameter rather than a factor, but in any case I feel thoroughly welcome. [:D]

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Re: You

Post by GrandPiano » 28 Mar 2015 19:18

sestir wrote:You may wish to call it a parameter rather than a factor, but in any case I feel thoroughly welcome. [:D]
I believe it's called a multiple.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: You

Post by eldin raigmore » 31 Mar 2015 16:00

Not sure what thread this should go in; I decided on this one, perhaps incorrectly.

I had baryiatric (I know I'm misspelling it; I think my spelling ought to be the correct one) surgery a week ago yesterday morning.
I'm doing just fine now.

But I was in the hospital a day longer than plan because I had to be intubated and spend the first 24 post-op hours in ICU.

I slept through all the excitement, though. When I recovered consciousness I was peeved by the tube and by having both my wrists bound, but that didn't last long, and after I was extubated and my right wrist was unbound I felt fine.

Here's what happened (I'm just assuming someone is interested):

I have sleep apnea and high blood pressure.

I was my surgeon's second procedure that day; his first patient had multiple procedures and complications and the surgery went on for two and a half hours longer than planned.

Hospitals put a lot of fluid in surgical patients pre-op.

So I had 2.5 hours' worth of extra fluid in me when I went under.

Having sleep apnea, I reacted to the anesthesia by stopping breathing.

Most people's blood-pressure goes up when they stop breathing.

Since I was already hypertensive, my blood-pressure really skyrocketed.

Since I had more fluid in me than was planned for, this pushed fluid into my lungs and I started getting pulmonary edema.

Also, I began to go into diastolic heart failure and/or congestive heart failure.

Apparently they extubated me one time that I don't remember. My sister, who went with me, says that I woke up (which I think probably overstates my state-of-consciousness at the time). They say I got very agitated because I was still on the verge of pneumonia with the fluid in my lungs so I was re-intubated and knocked back out.

Then I woke up in a lot of discomfort, not because of any of that, but because it felt like the damn urinary catheter wasn't working.

With a tube between your vocal cords you can't make a sound; with a tube between your lips nobody can read your lips.
I don't know of any sign-language where a speaker never needs to move at least one hand; anyway I don't know how to speak a sign-language, though I've been interested in Ameslan (American Sign Language, similar to Danish SL and French SL rather than to British SL).
So the ICU personnel would bring me a pen/pencil and a notepad.
But I couldn't see what I was writing; besides, you can't write very much or very well when you can't move anything above your wrist.
So they never understood what I wrote.

At least they frequently did things to let me know they were still there. I didn't even have a call-button; if they'd been behind my back and silent for too long I'd have panicked.

But they didn't let me panic, and that situation (intubated and both wrists bound and no call-button) didn't go on for hours.

[hr][/hr]

Which leads me to a proposal.

I think hospitals, especially ICUs and post-op recovery rooms, need a sign language that all the ICU (etc.) nurses (etc.) can learn easily, that can be used by a patient in that predicament (conscious, but intubated and both wrists bound), that the nurses -- or, at least, one nurse per hospital -- can quickly teach such a patient (at least if the nurse and the patient already have a spoken language in common).

Can we, as conlangers, come up with such a sign-language?

Is there a way to modify ASL or BSL or some other existing SL to be speakable with both wrists bound?

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Re: You

Post by Egerius » 31 Mar 2015 18:41

eldin raigmore wrote:I had bariatric surgery a week ago yesterday morning.
I'm doing just fine now.
Get well, edlin!
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Re: You

Post by shimobaatar » 31 Mar 2015 18:44

Egerius wrote:
eldin raigmore wrote:I had bariatric surgery a week ago yesterday morning.
I'm doing just fine now.
Get well, edlin!
[+1]

I'm sorry to hear you had to go through all that, but I'm glad to hear you're doing OK now.

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Re: You

Post by Prinsessa » 31 Mar 2015 18:47

What's a bariatric surgery?

It sounds bizarrely unresponsible that they wouldn't have someone stop the fluid injection if the surgery before yours was taking longer than expected.

Good to hear you're well enough to write on here, at least.

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eldin raigmore
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Re: You

Post by eldin raigmore » 31 Mar 2015 21:30

Prinsessa wrote:What's a bariatric surgery?
It sounds bizarrely unresponsible that they wouldn't have someone stop the fluid injection if the surgery before yours was taking longer than expected.
Good to hear you're well enough to write on here, at least.
I assume you know what surgery is.
"-bary-" is a Greek-derived morpheme with meaning related to "heavy".
"-iatr-" is a Greek-derives morpheme with meaning related to "physician" or "medicine".
"baryiatric" is an adjective meaning "of or pertaining to conditions related to (usually morbid) obesity, or to their treatment, or to the personnel who treat such conditions".

The particular procedure I had is called a "laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy".
"-tom-" is a Greek-derived morpheme with meaning related to "cut".
"-ectomy" is a Greek-derived morpheme with meaning related to "cut out".
"-gastr-" is a Greek-derived morpheme with meaning related to "stomach".
So a "gastrectomy" is any surgical procedure that involves cutting out the stomach (too literal), or part of the stomach.

In a "sleeve gastrectomy", the stomach's entire length is conserved, but its volume is reduced by systematically reducing its cross-sectional area.
A "sleeve", as long as the stomach and as wide as is considered therapeutically appropriate, and with a slot for the rest of the stomach to poke through, is fitted over the stomach, and the part that hangs out is cut off and pulled out. The wound this leaves in the stomach is stapled, sewn, and glued. Healing can be slowish; six months after surgery I'll be able to eat most things I could eat before (though nowhere near as fast or as much), but until then I'll be on a restricted diet. They'll keep monitoring me for the entire first year, then check up on me every year for five years.

"Laparoscopic" refers to a method for surgery that minimizes the cutting to tissues other than those that must be treated.
In my case three holes were poked in my belly. Then they inflated my belly with CO2 gas. They could stick a light through one of the holes; and a fiber-optic viewing device through one; and surgical instruments through one or more; and pull out the cut-off part of the stomach through one; and remove the CO2 gas through one.
So they didn't have to slice my belly open, pull aside the skin (and, in my case, all that fat!), and lay eyes directly on my stomach.
So my outer abdominal wall just has three very small incisions in it, easily sewn up and quickly healing (almost healed now IMO).
The only long incision is totally internal; it's the one the procedure was all about, where ⅔ to ¾ of my stomach was cut out and discarded.

About that; it doesn't hurt at all. I've been told "you have a high tolerance for pain", but I don't think that's true. "Tolerating pain" implies that you feel the pain but you put up with it. I think I have a partially-defective pain sense; certain things that ought to hurt me (like a heart attack or a broken collarbone) don't hurt me nearly as much as they should (they still hurt, just not enough IMO). Other things (like a sprained wrist or a scorpion sting) hurt like the dickens, though, so it's not lowered sensitivity to all pain.

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Re: You

Post by Prinsessa » 31 Mar 2015 21:50

Ah, as in barometer. Wasn't aware of -iatr- tho.

Thanks for explaining in such detail! [tick]

Still sounds super scary. I hope it all goes well without unnecessary future complications and a worthwhile operation!

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Re: You

Post by Micamo » 31 Mar 2015 21:52

:<

Get well soon, Eldin!
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Re: You

Post by thaen » 31 Mar 2015 22:04

Micamo wrote::<

Get well soon, Eldin!
[+1]
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DesEsseintes
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Re: You

Post by DesEsseintes » 01 Apr 2015 06:34

I wish you a speedy recovery, eldin.

Echoing other posters before me, it's encouraging that you're already posting on here. [:)]

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Re: You

Post by Runomso » 12 Apr 2015 14:16

Alias(es): Runomso I guess [:P]
Location: Hessen, Germany
Date of birth: September 28th
Gender: female
Occupation: student
Interests: languages, animes, video games, biology, psychology (a bit)
Favorite music: metalcore
Political ideology: I don't care
Conlangs: Ukiku and some other "unimportant" ones
Other hobbies: drawing, writing; nearly everything that has to do with creativity
Where do you see yourself in ten years? Good question.
native: German
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My conlang: Ukiku

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eldin raigmore
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Re: You

Post by eldin raigmore » 12 Apr 2015 19:28

DesEsseintes wrote:I wish you a speedy recovery, eldin.
Echoing other posters before me, it's encouraging that you're already posting on here. [:)]
Thanks! Micamo, Thaen, DesEsseintes, et al.
I graduated from "full liquid" to "pureed" a few days ago, and this coming Wednesday I'll graduate from "pureed" to "soft"!
May not seem like a big deal to anyone else, but I'm looking forward to it like a kid looks forward to Christmas.

And:
Welcome, Runomso!

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Re: You

Post by k1234567890y » 12 Apr 2015 19:30

eldin raigmore wrote:
DesEsseintes wrote:I wish you a speedy recovery, eldin.
Echoing other posters before me, it's encouraging that you're already posting on here. [:)]
Thanks!
I graduated from "full liquid" to "pureed" a few days ago, and this coming Wednesday I'll graduate from "pureed" to "soft"!
May not seem like a big deal to anyone else, but I'm looking forward to it like a kid looks forward to Christmas.

And:
Welcome, Runomso!
come around soom :)
Runomso wrote:Alias(es): Runomso I guess [:P]
Location: Hessen, Germany
Date of birth: September 28th
Gender: female
Occupation: student
Interests: languages, animes, video games, biology, psychology (a bit)
Favorite music: metalcore
Political ideology: I don't care
Conlangs: Ukiku and some other "unimportant" ones
Other hobbies: drawing, writing; nearly everything that has to do with creativity
Where do you see yourself in ten years? Good question.
Wilkommen beim CBB Forum
...

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Re: You

Post by Runomso » 13 Apr 2015 19:09

And:
Welcome, Runomso!
come around soom :)
Danke! Thank you very much [:)]
native: German
know good: English
learning: Spanish
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My conlang: Ukiku

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Re: You

Post by elemtilas » 13 Apr 2015 20:53

eldin raigmore wrote:Not sure what thread this should go in; I decided on this one, perhaps incorrectly.

I had baryiatric (I know I'm misspelling it; I think my spelling ought to be the correct one) surgery a week ago yesterday morning.
I'm doing just fine now.
Didn't see this earlier, but I also wish you a speedy recovery!
But I was in the hospital a day longer than plan because I had to be intubated and spend the first 24 post-op hours in ICU.

I slept through all the excitement, though. When I recovered consciousness I was peeved by the tube and by having both my wrists bound, but that didn't last long, and after I was extubated and my right wrist was unbound I felt fine.
Okay -- this explains the sign language proposal in the other thread! A little personal experience here. I guess between us (you patient me nurse), we've got both sides covered, then. [;)]
Here's what happened (I'm just assuming someone is interested):

I have sleep apnea and high blood pressure.
Not a good combination, to be sure. I'm sure we all hope this procedure will help get you to the point where neither of these will so much of a concern!
I was my surgeon's second procedure that day; his first patient had multiple procedures and complications and the surgery went on for two and a half hours longer than planned.
It happens. I certainly don't mean to be flippant -- but sometimes things go wrong, and the next person in line has to wait. It's never a pleasant wait; and I certainly hope your hospital had some kind of liason that could let you know what's keeping your surgeon away!
Hospitals put a lot of fluid in surgical patients pre-op.
They certainly give "some" -- without knowing how much you got, it would be difficult for me to say whether or not you got "too much" or whether or not the amount was appopriate.

Keep in mind, though, that you had nothing to eat or drink since midnight the night before -- and most people do not wait til 1145pm to bolt down that last steak and potatoes with a couple litres of coke! Most people come to the hospital already fasting a good twelve hours. If the case before you is going long, then you'd easily be pushing 15 hours without so much as a sip of water. The amount of fluid they give you will be determined at least in part by your size as well as time -- it may seem like a lot, but think about how much you'd normally drink between six am and noon -- for me, that could easily be 64 + ounces of fluid. I will say it is always a bit of a heartbreak to have to deny someone a sip of water when they're pretty clearly dying of thirst; or to listen to them beg for a chip of ice to suck on. But eating and drinking before general anaesthesia is a strict no-no. The alternative is extremely horrible: when you put things in your stomach, you turn on all that acid production. Normally this is not a problem, but with the medications they give to you -- muscle relaxants especially -- all that nice acid will just flow right up your esophagus and down into your lungs. Acid and lungs don't get along very well. And, being asleep and completely relaxed, you would have no defense against that -- you wouldn't be able to cough or swallow or anything. And it would just sit in there for hours. Bad joss all around.
So I had 2.5 hours' worth of extra fluid in me when I went under.
I'm hoping they asked, during that time, -- or that you had the sense to ask! -- if you wanted to go use the bathroom! We like to avoid urinary catheters as much as possible (best way to avoid a UTI is to not introduce anything up anyone's urethra if at all possible). But there are other factors that might indicate one in your case.
Having sleep apnea, I reacted to the anesthesia by stopping breathing.
That's as expected. Everyone stops breathing once they start with the meds. But that's what the tube and the ventillator are for: they breathe for you. Sleep apnea certainly makes the process more dangerous: all the extra tissue in the back your throat falls back and makes it much harder for them to see your airway.
Most people's blood-pressure goes up when they stop breathing.
Yes. Other medications are given to stabilize blood pressure. Obviously, some folks react differently, or have a more extreme reaction!
Since I was already hypertensive, my blood-pressure really skyrocketed.

Since I had more fluid in me than was planned for, this pushed fluid into my lungs and I started getting pulmonary edema.

Also, I began to go into diastolic heart failure and/or congestive heart failure.
[:'(] Sorry to hear all that! It's always a sad thing when someone goes in for a surgery designed to help them become healthier; and they end up with another bad problem in stead! That's the scariest thing I've heard you say yet! I hope that you took your b.p. meds that morning (usually hypertension patients are on some kind of diuretic -- that would have helped get rid of some of the fluid); I would also hope that they would have given you something for fluid management during the procedure as well.
Apparently they extubated me one time that I don't remember. My sister, who went with me, says that I woke up (which I think probably overstates my state-of-consciousness at the time).
Yeah. "Waking up" can mean several different things, and being fully conscious and aware really isn't one of them! There are certainly differenlt levels of awareness -- some of your parts may be more aware than others; there are also the effects of medications to think about. If they kept you intubated, they probably also kept you pretty well narcotised. You would have been pretty oblivious to everything. What your sister describes is probably your body kind of waking up. Well before a patient can understand and follow commands, you might have squirmed around a bit, maybe tried to lift your arms up, maybe kicked your legs a bit. Eventually, even when some part of your mind was able to process and follow commands (like "open your eyes" or "open your mouth") You (the person we can actually talk with) might still be quite unaware and would not remember. So yeah, some part of you "woke up", but You might still have been wandering other paths somewhere!
They say I got very agitated because I was still on the verge of pneumonia with the fluid in my lungs so I was re-intubated and knocked back out.
Could be. That could certainly exacerbate. Some people, as I said, react differently to medications; some anaesthesiologists have a little less finesse than others. It is an art as much as or even more than it is a science. Waking up agitated is pretty common -- some people wake up just as smooth as new milk, they pop their eyes open and start talking just as if they never went to sleep (before falling asleep again for another while!); other people wake up swinging their fists and literally trying to jump off the bed. Most people fall somewhere along the continuum in between.
Then I woke up in a lot of discomfort, not because of any of that, but because it felt like the damn urinary catheter wasn't working.
Yep. They are not designed for comfort, really. One effect of having a catheter shoved up there is that you feel like you have to pee all the time; and other is that you can't!
With a tube between your vocal cords you can't make a sound; with a tube between your lips nobody can read your lips.
I don't know of any sign-language where a speaker never needs to move at least one hand; anyway I don't know how to speak a sign-language, though I've been interested in Ameslan (American Sign Language, similar to Danish SL and French SL rather than to British SL).
So the ICU personnel would bring me a pen/pencil and a notepad.
But I couldn't see what I was writing; besides, you can't write very much or very well when you can't move anything above your wrist.
So they never understood what I wrote.
They really should have tried to explain things better, and perhaps a little more frequently. Especially as you were regaining consciousness.
At least they frequently did things to let me know they were still there. I didn't even have a call-button; if they'd been behind my back and silent for too long I'd have panicked. But they didn't let me panic, and that situation (intubated and both wrists bound and no call-button) didn't go on for hours.
That's good at least! I'm sure they had your wrists strapped to keep you from reaching up to grab the tube; and they probably wanted you to be a little more awake before undoing the straps. Even when still not-quite-back-among-the-living, awakening patients can still hear and can still understand. I think they perhaps could have done better to explain and reassure, verbally, even if you aren't quite able to talk or communicate effectively.

Ah! I see later you describe what procedure you had done: I've never seen a "sleeve gastrectomy", but understand what you described. That's pretty major, even if it's laparoscopic.

Of course, you don't need me to tell you this is really the opening salvo; that many bariatric surgery patients regain lost weight; that the road ahead is not easy; etc. It may or may not be much consolation, but I'm sure everyone here will keep you in mind, will pray for you and hope you win the fight in the end!

Hope this helps understand some of the reasoning on the Other Side!

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Re: You

Post by Avo » 13 Apr 2015 20:56

Runomso wrote:Location: Hessen, Germany
Date of birth: September 28th
You're from Germany's bestest state and your birthday is four days after mine. You seem like a decent person.

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Re: You

Post by Runomso » 15 Apr 2015 18:56

You're from Germany's bestest state and your birthday is four days after mine. You seem like a decent person.
You've seen through me. [;)]
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eldin raigmore
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Re: You

Post by eldin raigmore » 19 Apr 2015 15:42

elemtilas wrote:
(1) Thanks! I can tell you really understand.
(2) Wow, Padraig! I never knew you are a nurse!
elemtilas wrote:…. I'm sure they had your wrists strapped to keep you from reaching up to grab the tube; and they probably wanted you to be a little more awake before undoing the straps. ….
I had various I.V.s etc. in both arms and both hands. AIUI my arms were restrained to keep me from accidentally pulling those out or otherwise wrong.
The tube was not uncomfortable. FAIK it would have hurt going in*; but I slept through that.
*(Actually, since I coughed up bloody phlegm for two or three days after I was extubated, I'll bet it would have hurt going in. But it didn't hurt just being there.)

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