You

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
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Lao Kou
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Re: You

Post by Lao Kou » 23 Jul 2018 11:48

samsam wrote:
23 Jul 2018 09:03
Conlangslangs: everytime I stop to phonology. I make vocabulary by pré-made lists instead of making words when I have an idea.
So stop stopping at phonology and get on with the conlanging already. [:)] (Believe it or not, conlanging can be a pleasant creative experience, and not, as is often presupposed, a Linguistics101 test).
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samsam
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Re: You

Post by samsam » 23 Jul 2018 12:53

Lao Kou wrote:
23 Jul 2018 11:48
So stop stopping at phonology and get on with the conlanging already. [:)] (Believe it or not, conlanging can be a pleasant creative experience, and not, as is often presupposed, a Linguistics101 test).
I'm sorry, I don't get what you said. [:$]
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Re: You

Post by shimobaatar » 23 Jul 2018 13:07

Welcome to the CBB, samsam!

Lao Kou wrote:
23 Jul 2018 11:48
So stop stopping at phonology and get on with the conlanging already.
Much more easily said than done for many of us, unfortunately.

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samsam
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Re: You

Post by samsam » 23 Jul 2018 13:13

shimobaatar wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:07
Welcome to the CBB, samsam!

Lao Kou wrote:
23 Jul 2018 11:48
So stop stopping at phonology and get on with the conlanging already.
Much more easily said than done for many of us, unfortunately.
Thank you!
I'm not sure if I mentioned that I'm creating an Indo-Iranian conlang, so I must make the phonology before anything because I want my conlang to be realistic/natural.
Actually, I have problems with the aspirated stops because I don't know how to use them (It's said on wikipedia that aspirated stops come in sanskrit before an original laryngeal but the only laryngeal I saw was /h/)
Last edited by samsam on 23 Jul 2018 13:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: You

Post by shimobaatar » 23 Jul 2018 13:19

samsam wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:13
I'm not sure if I mentioned that I'm creating an Indo-Iranian conlang, so I must make the phonology before anything because I want my conlang to be realistic/natural.
Well, if you're making an a posteriori conlang, might it be better to apply sound changes and see how the phonology develops first rather than to begin by having a phonology set in stone?

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Re: You

Post by samsam » 23 Jul 2018 13:24

You're right! Thanks for your help ! [:)]
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Lao Kou
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Re: You

Post by Lao Kou » 23 Jul 2018 13:29

shimobaatar wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:07
Welcome to the CBB, samsam!
Lao Kou wrote:
23 Jul 2018 11:48
So stop stopping at phonology and get on with the conlanging already.
Much more easily said than done for many of us, unfortunately.
For me, a language is a lot more than its phonology and phonotactics. And while the "How to" books tell you to start here, I'd be far more interested in looking at funky words and sentence structures than how a [ b] realizes itself around a nasal.

(About five posts posted as I was writing this, so never mind).
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Re: You

Post by shimobaatar » 23 Jul 2018 13:35

Lao Kou wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:29
For me, a language is a lot more than its phonology and phonotactics.
Oh, of course it is! I just mean that, for many of us, it's not easy to get past the phonology, not that we're not interested in theoretically doing so. Creative block is a menace!

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Re: You

Post by Lao Kou » 23 Jul 2018 13:52

shimobaatar wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:35
Oh, of course it is! I just mean that, for many of us, it's not easy to get past the phonology, not that we're not interested in theoretically doing so. Creative block is a menace!
I appreciate this. But for me, and I don't consider myself clinically insane, Géarthnuns just wouldn't shut the f***k up.

We approach our projects in different ways and from different angles, and that's fine. I just wish there were things to look at other than IPA charts and Esperanto-esque paradigms from time to time.
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KaiTheHomoSapien
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Re: You

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 23 Jul 2018 18:42

I guess I'm fortunate that phonology is not what I'm most interested in, otherwise I might've gotten bogged down in it too. It's all about crazy morphology for me. Not that that's any less of a mire [:$]
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Re: You

Post by Ælfwine » 28 Jul 2018 21:04

shimobaatar wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:19
samsam wrote:
23 Jul 2018 13:13
I'm not sure if I mentioned that I'm creating an Indo-Iranian conlang, so I must make the phonology before anything because I want my conlang to be realistic/natural.
Well, if you're making an a posteriori conlang, might it be better to apply sound changes and see how the phonology develops first rather than to begin by having a phonology set in stone?
^this

Sound Changes are arguably more important for a posteriori than a priori since they determine the resulting phonology.
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