The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Ànradh » 08 Jul 2018 04:13

sangi39 wrote:
04 Jul 2018 20:45
Politically, the district predominantly votes for Conservative Party members, with the Richmond (Yorks) constituency electing a Conservative MP in every general election since 1929, who have consistently gained not just a plurality of votes but a majority of votes in every election other than in 1997 and in the 1989 by-election, in which William Hague defeated a Social Democrat candidate by just 5% of the vote, holding the seat until 2015, the year he became the Lord Hague of Richmond, with Rishi Sunak taking his place after the general election.
Oooft... To those trapped in similar nightmares, we're having population growth issues up here. Hint hint. :P
Sin ar Pàrras agus nì sinne mar a thogras sinn. Choisinn sinn e agus ’s urrainn dhuinn ga loisgeadh.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by sangi39 » 08 Jul 2018 22:50

Ànradh wrote:
08 Jul 2018 04:13
sangi39 wrote:
04 Jul 2018 20:45
Politically, the district predominantly votes for Conservative Party members, with the Richmond (Yorks) constituency electing a Conservative MP in every general election since 1929, who have consistently gained not just a plurality of votes but a majority of votes in every election other than in 1997 and in the 1989 by-election, in which William Hague defeated a Social Democrat candidate by just 5% of the vote, holding the seat until 2015, the year he became the Lord Hague of Richmond, with Rishi Sunak taking his place after the general election.
Oooft... To those trapped in similar nightmares, we're having population growth issues up here. Hint hint. :P
Well, I've not been to Scotland yet, so may be worth a visit (I've only been about an hour and forty-five minutes from the border for most of my life, lol)
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 10 Jul 2018 22:18

I got stung by a yellow-jacket this morning. It hurts so much [:'(]

In general I don't hate or fear bugs, but these I loathe. We put up several traps, but there's just so many, there's only so much you can do. At least I'm not allergic.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by k1234567890y » 12 Jul 2018 03:36

;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-;

I feel I am not a good person
私のアツい人工言語活動!言カツ!始まります!!

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by kiwikami » 12 Jul 2018 06:23

k1234567890y wrote:
12 Jul 2018 03:36
;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-;

I feel I am not a good person
:?: [:(]
I don't feel that I know you well enough to objectively say that you are in fact a good person, but you most certainly don't seem like a bad (or even below-average) one!
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 12 Jul 2018 14:44

k1234567890y wrote:
12 Jul 2018 03:36
;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-; ;-;

I feel I am not a good person
You cannot simply walk the walk of the so-called 'good', or you will whirl like a footless dervish, cursing your own footlessness.

Rather, You have to fight the good fight, and fight it beyond tiring, each day. In big battles or smallest skirmishes.
Then, you will have found your legs.
Then, you will be a good person.

[<3]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Am8ySL6xNB0

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 12 Jul 2018 14:58

KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
10 Jul 2018 22:18
I got stung by a yellow-jacket this morning. It hurts so much [:'(]

In general I don't hate or fear bugs, but these I loathe. We put up several traps, but there's just so many, there's only so much you can do. At least I'm not allergic.
Damn contemnible, flower-pollinating hymenopterids!

Be grateful it wasn't this gal who zinged you:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwFywVes7C0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8BUWxh9xEY

Or this buggie (!!)
https://imgur.com/gallery/nOGvq

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKWcIaJtS6Q
[:'(]

But seriously, if/when you get stung (again) ice, or a poultice of plantain leaves will help, among other ersatz remedies:
Spoiler:
8 Natural Bee Sting Remedies
After the stinger has been removed and the wound cleaned, you can use one of these 8 bee sting remedies:

1. Ice. Apply ice for 20 minutes. Ice will numb the pain and slow blood flow to the area, which reduces swelling.

2. Honey. A degree of irony resides in this bee sting remedy since honey comes from bees, but honey is excellent for healing wounds. Apply a small dab of honey to the wound and cover with gauze or a small rag for 30 minutes to one hour. (If a person is allergic to bees or honey, do not use this remedy.)

3. Lavender essential oil. Add one or two drops of lavender essential oil to the wound. Lavender oil will help neutralize the venom immediately.

4. Crushed garlic. Crush one or two garlic cloves to release the juices and press it against the wound. Cover with a moist rag or towel and let it sit for 20 to 30 minutes.plantain

5. Plantain. This is not the fruit! Plantain (Plantago major, broad leaf and Plantago lanceolata, long leaf) is a common weed you’ll find around your home. It typically grows in places where the soil has been disturbed. It can also be found growing in the cracks of your sidewalks. Bee stings are never planned, so it may be a good idea to purchase the Plantago major plant from a local garden and keep it at your home. Although it is a weed, it has lovely purple foliage and leaves that look like small green roses. To use plantain as a bee sting treatment, you need to release the juices from the leaves. This can be done by using a food processor or putting the leaves in a plastic bag and crushing them with a spoon. You can even chew it slightly to release the juices. Once you obtain the juice, press the juicy leaves against the sting and cover with a moist rag or towel for 30 minutes.

6. Baking soda and vinegar. Make a paste using baking soda, a dab of vinegar and water and apply it to the wound for 30 minutes. Baking soda and vinegar helps neutralize the acid found in bee stings.

7. Toothpaste. Like baking soda, toothpaste is a base that will help neutralize the acidic bee sting, thereby reducing pain and swelling. Apply the toothpaste to the wound for 20 to 30 minutes.

8. Meat tenderizer. Make a paste using meat tenderizer and water and apply it to the wound for 20 minutes.

After achieving pain relief with one of these home remedies for bee stings, cleanse the skin by using a wet paper towel or rag and apply a small amount of an over-the-counter antibiotic cream or a natural first aid remedy to help prevent infection.
Ice is probably the fastest-acting and numbest, though shortest-lived (from melting).

I wouldn't be surprised if some kind of menthol would do the same: mint oil, mint essence, icy-hot, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwWVuLADoY0

Looks like yes.

In past forestly excursions and woodsy constitutionals, I have applied a mouth-chewed pulpy blop of plantain leaves to mosquito bites and nettle zaps. It is not immediate, but does help, though part of it might have been due to enzymes (albethey weak) in my saliva.
:wat:
P.S:
I'm talking Plantago major , the plant with somewhat thick, waxy-squeaky, cabbagey leaves, which see:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK7g3pIRWe4

I imagine the other common species would do the trick, being a Plantago, but I never tried it. Word to the wise, the bigger, more mature leaves have almost unbreakable fibrous veins running through them. I once tried making a quick emoliente de llantén throwing the leaves into a blender, instead of slow-boiling them.
Long story short, those fibers snarled the blades and burnt out the motor. :mrred: Hooray for herbal healing! [}:(] Mebbe a more modren food-processor would perform better, still our teeth and jaws can do a surprisingly good job of pulping the leaves. And when you're in the middle of the woods, or in a playground, park, moor or mountain, yer own gob is all you'll have.


BTW, this plant is über-ubiquitous. So much so, Native Americans gave the weedy invader (which arrived with European colonists) the nickname 'White Man's feet", or "English Man's footsteps".

http://eattheinvaders.org/white-mans-foot/
Last edited by Lambuzhao on 12 Jul 2018 15:19, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by elemtilas » 12 Jul 2018 15:09

Lambuzhao wrote:
12 Jul 2018 14:58
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
10 Jul 2018 22:18
I got stung by a yellow-jacket this morning. It hurts so much [:'(]

In general I don't hate or fear bugs, but these I loathe. We put up several traps, but there's just so many, there's only so much you can do. At least I'm not allergic.
Damn contemnible, flower-pollinating hymenopterids!

Be grateful it wasn't this gal who zinged you:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwFywVes7C0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8BUWxh9xEY
[O.O] I like the guy who would rather set fire to his entire house just to deal with a couple bugs!

A shotgun might be more helpful against those critters.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 12 Jul 2018 15:23

elemtilas wrote:
12 Jul 2018 15:09
Lambuzhao wrote:
12 Jul 2018 14:58
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
10 Jul 2018 22:18
I got stung by a yellow-jacket this morning. It hurts so much [:'(]

In general I don't hate or fear bugs, but these I loathe. We put up several traps, but there's just so many, there's only so much you can do. At least I'm not allergic.
Damn contemnible, flower-pollinating hymenopterids!

Be grateful it wasn't this gal who zinged you:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwFywVes7C0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8BUWxh9xEY
[O.O] I like the guy who would rather set fire to his entire house just to deal with a couple bugs!

A shotgun might be more helpful against those critters.
Clearly slightly girthier versions should have been cast in the 'bug attack' scene from Peeter Jicksen's King Kong. [}:D]

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 12 Jul 2018 16:42

Ice worked well for me. I put some ice in a ziploc bag and had it on the sting site (which was on my left hand) for about half an hour. After that I couldn't even see the sting site anymore, although it still hurt for several hours after that. I'm just glad I didn't get stung by a tarantula hawk. From Wikipedia: the pain of a tarantula hawk sting is "...immediate, excruciating, unrelenting pain that simply shuts down one's ability to do anything, except scream. Mental discipline simply does not work in these situations." [O.O]
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » 12 Jul 2018 21:59

Yellow jackets aren’t a kind of bee. They’re a kind of wasp; a bit like hornets.
Bees are much more reasonable stingers; they won’t sting unless they’re willing to die.

Yellow jackets will sting for revenge. They have scent glands next to their venom glands, that release scent only when their abdomens are injured. Any nestmate which smells that scent will fly straight to the source and sting anything it meets on the way. So if you crush a yellow jacket you’ll get swarmed.

OTOH I was stung by a single Michigan white-faced bee and had to take a ten-day Medrol dose-pack. And I had to stay home from work the first day. The pain was remarkably lasting and distractingly intense.

As a kid I was stung by multiple honeybees and multiple yellowjackets. I was also stung by one hornet, one scorpion, one bumblebee, and a few one-at-a-time wasps (widely spaced in time). None of it was fun.

Since I was allergic to so many things as a pre-adult in my hometown, I would be surprised if I weren’t allergic to the local honeybees there. But apparently all my other allergies were very location-specific; so, if I had such a 🐝 bee allergy, I must have left it behind and escaped it when I moved to Michigan.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Xonen » 14 Jul 2018 10:12

Lambuzhao wrote:
12 Jul 2018 14:58
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
10 Jul 2018 22:18
I got stung by a yellow-jacket this morning. It hurts so much [:'(]

In general I don't hate or fear bugs, but these I loathe. We put up several traps, but there's just so many, there's only so much you can do. At least I'm not allergic.
Damn contemnible, flower-pollinating hymenopterids!
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Ànradh » 14 Jul 2018 13:01

Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 10:12
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.
I learned recently that wasps actually do pollinate, just not very effectively; they themselves eat nectar in their adult morph, but their grubs are insectivorous (which is why I used to think wasps were predatory).

But yeah, they're angry, malice filled little things. The heat makes them mad too; I one in here the other day smashing itself into walls and ceiling, until it finally decided the most reasonable approach would be to start stinging the plaster... I purchased a can of Raid that afternoon.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Salmoneus » 14 Jul 2018 13:44

Frislander wrote:
04 Jul 2018 21:33
sangi39 wrote:
04 Jul 2018 20:45
I'm from roughly the same part of the country as Frislander (IIRC, we were about 20 miles from each other before he started his university course)
Well considering I'm back home for the Long Vacation I probably still am at this point in time, and 20 miles sounds about right (though we've never had enough reason to head west from where we are to give me a proper sense of how far away Richmond is, but we're definitely in the same constituency).
and, yeah, around here it's pretty much white, and middle/old-aged white English. At least as of the 2011 census, 98% of people living in our District, with a population of around 90,000, are white, 54% are above the age of 45, 83% identify as Christian (with 10% stating they have no religion, with other religious affiliations making up less than 1% each), and international migration to the area has averaged around 80 people each year for the last two decades.
Whereas I'm from the other end of the country, and it's the same here too. My 'home' (parents/childhood) constituency is, again, 98% white, and 2% asian. About a year ago, a black family, or maybe even two, moved into my hometown. Everybody noticed. Not in a race-hate way - since black people didn't previously exist here, there's never been any reason for racism toward them (instead, the racism is toward Travellers, and generic foreigners and people-coming-over-here in a theoretical faraway sense).


And similarly in Cumbria where I lived in the earlier part of my childhood
Wait, you're from cumbria!? [did I know that already? if so, sorry for forgetting]. Which part of Cumbria?
[I'm not from Cumbria, but my father grew up there, and it's been a frequent holiday destination. I was up there a couple of weeks ago, actually. He's from Keswick, though he later moved out to the coast]
Politically, the district predominantly votes for Conservative Party members, with the Richmond (Yorks) constituency electing a Conservative MP in every general election since 1929, who have consistently gained not just a plurality of votes but a majority of votes in every election other than in 1997 and in the 1989 by-election, in which William Hague defeated a Social Democrat candidate by just 5% of the vote, holding the seat until 2015, the year he became the Lord Hague of Richmond, with Rishi Sunak taking his place after the general election.
Yup, same here. I mean, different names, obviously. But "always voted Tory", "long-standing Tory MP retired", "rich Asian Tory parachuted into the area", etc.

Although I would say: woah, you two are really from a swing seat, aren't you! Around here, there was a landslide swing to Labour at the last election - for the first time in decades, the Tories got under 65% of the vote! And that's not just this seat, that's all the seats for miles around are like that. [though, interestingly, the area was totally split by brexit - some seats were strongly remain, some strongly leave. It's a class thing. But it points out that not all safe Tory seats are alike...]

Ironically, through my parents I know a fair few "archetypal Tory voters" in that seat - older, higher class, instinctively socially conservative, involved in flower clubs and the WI and things like that... and they all hate the Tories at the moment. They think they're inept, cruel, and crass. But they've been taught since birth that one must never, ever vote Labour or else the gulags will spring up overnight, so they just keep voting Tory and grumbling about it...
I can understand the "culture shock" aspect of moving away, and had the same thing when I moved to Sheffield, which even at 81% white British is much more diverse than where I'm from. Me and my then-wife took my brother down to High Wycombe once for an anniversary celebration, and his reaction was honestly hilarious. People here can have a fairly... I don't know... "isolated" view regarding ethnicity, since we're only really exposed to it through the media and the odd exception here and there, so I guess to a point we find it harder to "get" topics of ethnic diversity since we just don't really experience it. Obviously not everyone up here is like a massive racist or anything, but referring to a Chinese takeaway restaurant as a "chinky" isn't exactly uncommon either, even amongst younger people.
I definitely wouldn't use that word, but then we practically never had takeaways growing up, or at least I never had them with people other than my immediate family who don't use it either. But yeah even Cambridge was a bit of a shock for me, and there I had loads of students from London complaining about how it was "very white".
I would never use that word, and nor would anyone I know. I can imagine some of the locals where I grew up using the word in theory... but in practice, only the relatively upper class people eat Chinese, so I doubt it would ever arise. I honestly don't think many people would use the p-word, either, it's not that bad.

And yeah - when I went to Oxford, I met a black person for the first time! [we had a couple of Asian kids at school, and a couple of Chinese too]. When my friends and I first watched The Wire, and this isn't racism it's just a fact, all the black people looked the same to us. Couldn't tell them apart other than by voice and character and occasionally by facial hair, for at least the first season. Now, obviously, having watched a lot more US television since then, and having lived a couple of years in a 70-percent black area, the characters are as easy to distinguish as white people are - but if you grow up seeing only people who look a certain way, and learning what differences to hone in on to identify people, and suddenly you meet people totally outside the initial sample, it's genuinely hard to recognise faces for a while, until you subconsciously relearn what to look for.


So anyway, I can see why, for younger people, given the prevailing idea that one's worth is to a large extent defined by how 'diverse' one's associates are, there's a lot of confusion and resentment, because for huge parts of the country multiculturalism isn't a viable possibility without abandoning your entire support network. I'm fortunate, in that I grew up near London; but people in a lot of the country didn't, and they can't just move to London without leaving their old families and friends behind. I saw someone online recently saying that anyone who didn't have at least three black friends must be a racist, for choosing to avoid black people - well maybe in America, mate, but here, outside London and a couple of small pockets elsewhere, you could drive around for weeks just trying to find three black people, let alone befriending them.

[The UK today is around 3% black - 20 years ago, it was half that. 2/3rds of the black people in the UK live in London.]

I find it weird that Frieslander would really want to meet 'a Native American', as though they were a zoo exhibit. But I find it equally weird, and frankly rather naive, for people to reply with 'oh, they're everywhere, you don't have to come to the US!' - sure, there must be some native americans in London, but we'd be talking a number you could count on your hands (well no, but not far off it). The NA population even of the US is very small, it's a population that's disproportionately tied to its traditional areas by poverty and prejudice, and outside of the American enclaves in London I'd suggest it would be really, really hard to find any in other western countries. [well, Canada, obviously, but...]

[there's actually quite a lot of english and scottish people with some native american ancestry, but mostly from centuries ago, and they'd be unaware of it in most cases]

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by sangi39 » 14 Jul 2018 14:19

Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:44
Frislander wrote:
04 Jul 2018 21:33
And similarly in Cumbria where I lived in the earlier part of my childhood
Wait, you're from cumbria!? [did I know that already? if so, sorry for forgetting]. Which part of Cumbria?
[I'm not from Cumbria, but my father grew up there, and it's been a frequent holiday destination. I was up there a couple of weeks ago, actually. He's from Keswick, though he later moved out to the coast]
[/quote]

Ha! Same here! [:D] My dad's side of the family are from around Whitehaven and Workington.


Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:44
Although I would say: woah, you two are really from a swing seat, aren't you! Around here, there was a landslide swing to Labour at the last election - for the first time in decades, the Tories got under 65% of the vote! And that's not just this seat, that's all the seats for miles around are like that. [though, interestingly, the area was totally split by brexit - some seats were strongly remain, some strongly leave. It's a class thing. But it points out that not all safe Tory seats are alike...]
We're a swing seat? I thought we were safe as hell [:P]
You can tell the same lie a thousand times,
But it never gets any more true,
So close your eyes once more and once more believe
That they all still believe in you.
Just one time.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Frislander » 14 Jul 2018 16:17

Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:44
Frislander wrote:
04 Jul 2018 21:33
And similarly in Cumbria where I lived in the earlier part of my childhood
Wait, you're from cumbria!? [did I know that already? if so, sorry for forgetting]. Which part of Cumbria?
[I'm not from Cumbria, but my father grew up there, and it's been a frequent holiday destination. I was up there a couple of weeks ago, actually. He's from Keswick, though he later moved out to the coast]
Well "from" is a bit strong, it was basically just my dad was a vicar in Penrith for 7 years during the earlier part of my childhood, it's not like I have strong family roots their outside of one of my dad's aunts and their children, though tbf I definitely miss the scenery.
And yeah - when I went to Oxford, I met a black person for the first time! [we had a couple of Asian kids at school, and a couple of Chinese too]. When my friends and I first watched The Wire, and this isn't racism it's just a fact, all the black people looked the same to us. Couldn't tell them apart other than by voice and character and occasionally by facial hair, for at least the first season. Now, obviously, having watched a lot more US television since then, and having lived a couple of years in a 70-percent black area, the characters are as easy to distinguish as white people are - but if you grow up seeing only people who look a certain way, and learning what differences to hone in on to identify people, and suddenly you meet people totally outside the initial sample, it's genuinely hard to recognise faces for a while, until you subconsciously relearn what to look for.


So anyway, I can see why, for younger people, given the prevailing idea that one's worth is to a large extent defined by how 'diverse' one's associates are, there's a lot of confusion and resentment, because for huge parts of the country multiculturalism isn't a viable possibility without abandoning your entire support network. I'm fortunate, in that I grew up near London; but people in a lot of the country didn't, and they can't just move to London without leaving their old families and friends behind. I saw someone online recently saying that anyone who didn't have at least three black friends must be a racist, for choosing to avoid black people - well maybe in America, mate, but here, outside London and a couple of small pockets elsewhere, you could drive around for weeks just trying to find three black people, let alone befriending them.

[The UK today is around 3% black - 20 years ago, it was half that. 2/3rds of the black people in the UK live in London.]
For reference: I knew two black people when I was at school (and we also had a black teacher for a few weeks one time); one black person through church (that being the Archbishop of York); and I know two black people are university (both from London), and that's it.
I find it weird that Frislander would really want to meet 'a Native American', as though they were a zoo exhibit. But I find it equally weird, and frankly rather naive, for people to reply with 'oh, they're everywhere, you don't have to come to the US!' - sure, there must be some native americans in London, but we'd be talking a number you could count on your hands (well no, but not far off it). The NA population even of the US is very small, it's a population that's disproportionately tied to its traditional areas by poverty and prejudice, and outside of the American enclaves in London I'd suggest it would be really, really hard to find any in other western countries. [well, Canada, obviously, but...]

[there's actually quite a lot of english and scottish people with some native american ancestry, but mostly from centuries ago, and they'd be unaware of it in most cases]
I can't even find any statistics on the number of Native Americans currently residing in the UK, and there isn't even a "Native American" option on the census either.

Essentially the ethnic makeup of the UK is largely determined by what was still part of the Empire after the second world war, when large-scale immigration into the UK became possible. Thus the term "British Asian" typically refers to people of South Asian rather than East Asian extraction, while the Chinese population (which numbers less than half a million) is a large part Cantonese due to Britain's possession of Hong Kong.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Salmoneus » 14 Jul 2018 22:58

sangi39 wrote:
14 Jul 2018 14:19
Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:44
Frislander wrote:
04 Jul 2018 21:33
And similarly in Cumbria where I lived in the earlier part of my childhood
Wait, you're from cumbria!? [did I know that already? if so, sorry for forgetting]. Which part of Cumbria?
[I'm not from Cumbria, but my father grew up there, and it's been a frequent holiday destination. I was up there a couple of weeks ago, actually. He's from Keswick, though he later moved out to the coast]
Ha! Same here! [:D] My dad's side of the family are from around Whitehaven and Workington. [/quote]
My parents' first house was in Whitehaven, and my father used to work in Workington. Hmm. Is there something in the water up there than encourages future conlanging in the children of ex-Cumbrians?

Actually, both sides of my family have links there. My mother's side are Irish, but in the mid-century exodus a lot of her aunts and cousins migrated to west cumbria (as did a lot of Irish people, for some reason. Wouldn't have thought it would be a big draw, economically, but...). So when my mother came to this country, that's where she settled, where she knew people. She met my father, and they both came down south.

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Xonen
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Xonen » 14 Jul 2018 23:51

Ànradh wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:01
Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 10:12
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.
I learned recently that wasps actually do pollinate, just not very effectively; they themselves eat nectar in their adult morph, but their grubs are insectivorous (which is why I used to think wasps were predatory).
Well, from what I can gather, that seems to depend on the species a bit - and possibly also on your definition of "predatory", does an animal that kills others to feed them to its young count? In any case,
Wikipedia wrote:Yellowjacket or Yellow jacket is the common name in North America for predatory social wasps of the genera Vespula and Dolichovespula.

[...]

The diet of the adult yellowjacket consists primarily of items rich in sugars and carbohydrates, such as fruits, flower nectar, and tree sap. Larvae feed on proteins derived from insects, meats, and fish, which are collected by the adults, which chew and condition them before feeding them to the larvae. Many of the insects collected by the adults are considered pest species, making the yellowjacket beneficial to agriculture.[3] Larvae, in return, secrete a sugar material to be eaten by the adults; this exchange is a form of trophallaxis. In late summer, foraging workers pursue other food sources from meats to ripe fruits, or scavenge human garbage, sodas, picnics, etc., as additional sugar is needed to foster the next generation's queens.[3]

So yeah, they do (sometimes) visit flowers - but as you note, they make poor pollinators, not being fuzzy like bees. And in any case, they'll still pretty much sting you for looking at them funny, even if the risk of getting actually eaten by a wasp is relatively low.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Salmoneus » 14 Jul 2018 23:58

Frislander wrote:
14 Jul 2018 16:17

Well "from" is a bit strong, it was basically just my dad was a vicar in Penrith for 7 years during the earlier part of my childhood, it's not like I have strong family roots their outside of one of my dad's aunts and their children
That's "really strong family roots" in my book! [I think everyone in the last three generations on both sides of my family has moved from one place to another, so having more than one relative in any one region is an eerily tribal, blood-and-soil notion to me...]
, though tbf I definitely miss the scenery.
It's beautiful, yes. Though this year was the first time i've ever been there in the summer - weird to see everything so green! And non-wet!
I can't even find any statistics on the number of Native Americans currently residing in the UK, and there isn't even a "Native American" option on the census either.
There wouldn't be, the number being so tiny.

Best I can do is, going by the 2011 census: counting people who were born in the US, lived in the UK in 2011, and ticked 'other' (instead of white, black, asian or arab): 173 arrived before 1981; 750 arrived 81-00; another 751 by 06; and another 1,738 by 2011. So, around, let's say, 3,200 in total. But I suspect a big chunk of those will be people identifying as hispanic (etc).
Essentially the ethnic makeup of the UK is largely determined by what was still part of the Empire after the second world war, when large-scale immigration into the UK became possible. Thus the term "British Asian" typically refers to people of South Asian rather than East Asian extraction, while the Chinese population (which numbers less than half a million) is a large part Cantonese due to Britain's possession of Hong Kong.
Not quite so simple - there's been plenty of migration from non-Empire countries too. Of first-generation migrants, the top 10 origin countries (2015 UN estimates) include 5 that weren't in the empire in 1945 (Poland, Ireland, Germany, the USA and the PRC (not including HK)). The top 21 (including HK) include 10 non-empire (those 5, plus Italy, France, the Philippines, Somalia and Lithuania). And the five after that are non-Empire (Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Iran and Romania). Beyond that, there are also significant numbers from Latin America, Eastern Europe, and a non-negligible number from East Asia. And also the Dutch.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 14 Jul 2018 23:59

Ànradh wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:01
Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 10:12
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.
I learned recently that wasps actually do pollinate, just not very effectively; they themselves eat nectar in their adult morph, but their grubs are insectivorous (which is why I used to think wasps were predatory).
If I remember correctly, one or two species of wasp help create figs. Now whether it's by pollination, or some kind of weird Xenomorphic, flower-ovum traumatization, I cannot recall.

Also, I recall that quite a few sleek black wasps, and skinny red & yellow (not yellow jackets) wasps would worry the mint flowers in our garden.
They both gave searing, bell-ringing stings if you were careless.

Furthermore, bees descend from wasps, actually. :wat:
So… … bees are wasps, in a similar vein how birds are therapod dinosaurs.… .
or ornithoscelid dinosaurs, or whatever Velociraptor and his kind were shunted into after The Great Befuckening.
:roll:

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