The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

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Frislander
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Frislander » 15 Jul 2018 20:20

Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:58
Frislander wrote:
14 Jul 2018 16:17

Well "from" is a bit strong, it was basically just my dad was a vicar in Penrith for 7 years during the earlier part of my childhood, it's not like I have strong family roots their outside of one of my dad's aunts and their children
That's "really strong family roots" in my book! [I think everyone in the last three generations on both sides of my family has moved from one place to another, so having more than one relative in any one region is an eerily tribal, blood-and-soil notion to me...]
Yeah but consider that the rest of my dad's family is entirely County Durham, and this aunt only went to Cumbria caus she married an airman with an old family house there.
, though tbf I definitely miss the scenery.
It's beautiful, yes. Though this year was the first time i've ever been there in the summer - weird to see everything so green! And non-wet!
Actually imho I think Cumbria almost looks at its best when it's wet and misty, the stone deepened in colour from the water on it.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Ànradh » 15 Jul 2018 20:51

Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:51
Well, from what I can gather, that seems to depend on the species a bit - and possibly also on your definition of "predatory", does an animal that kills others to feed them to its young count?
Fair point actually, I suppose they would still qualify.
Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:51
And in any case, they'll still pretty much sting you for looking at them funny, even if the risk of getting actually eaten by a wasp is relatively low.
That's... less encouraging than as it might first be read. :P
Lambuzhao wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:59
Now whether it's by pollination, or some kind of weird Xenomorphic, flower-ovum traumatization, I cannot recall.
XD
Lam, have I ever mentioned that I adore your vocabulary choices?
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Xonen » 15 Jul 2018 22:10

Lambuzhao wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:59
Ànradh wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:01
Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 10:12
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.
I learned recently that wasps actually do pollinate, just not very effectively; they themselves eat nectar in their adult morph, but their grubs are insectivorous (which is why I used to think wasps were predatory).
If I remember correctly, one or two species of wasp help create figs. Now whether it's by pollination, or some kind of weird Xenomorphic, flower-ovum traumatization, I cannot recall.

Also, I recall that quite a few sleek black wasps, and skinny red & yellow (not yellow jackets) wasps would worry the mint flowers in our garden.
They both gave searing, bell-ringing stings if you were careless.

Furthermore, bees descend from wasps, actually. :wat:
So… … bees are wasps, in a similar vein how birds are therapod dinosaurs.…
Well, I'm more into etymology than vicious stinging insects myself, but at least (again) Wikipedia states that wasp is simply a generic term for "any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is neither a bee nor an ant". So I suppose it would make some sense to call all insects of order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita wasps with bees and ants as subgroups thereof, but whether or not anyone does this I don't know. Certainly most normal people wouldn't call an ant a wasp - but then, most normal people wouldn't call a chicken a dinosaur, either, so what do they know?

As for figs, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fig_wasp. Apparently, it involves both pollination and the larval stage living inside the host like a Xenomorph. The more you know.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Khemehekis » 16 Jul 2018 04:20

Lambuzhao wrote:
03 Jul 2018 14:04
Khemehekis wrote:
25 Jun 2018 01:24
I checked, and I do have "Cape gooseberry" (or "poha", as it's called in my neck of the woods) in Kankonian: yadzaliy. However, my Kankonian dictionary gives the scientific name as Physalis peruviana, not P. pruinosa.
Uff. Quite.

I asked some horticultural friends, and they tsked me on that one. 'Cape Gooseberry' or 'Golden Berry' is too frou-frou for our humble
Ground Cherry, or , if you prefer, :us-pa: :deu: Yuddekesche. [;)]

Still mighty tasteable, though. [:P]
Not familiar with the name "ground cherry". I love my poha jam, though.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Khemehekis » 16 Jul 2018 04:25

Reyzadren wrote:
04 Jul 2018 22:57
I didn't know any Jew until I went to university too, but I don't think that's of any importance to me and I don't care much about it because I basically fit in to pretty much any group anyway.
Wow!

I grew up in Orinda and Moraga, both in Contra Costa County, CA, and there were plenty of other Jewish families here. The biggest ethnic group in Moraga was Germans, but we also had Irish, Italians, Dutch, Scandinavians, French, Poles, Serbians, Latvians and Lithuanians, Arabs, Lebanese, Persians, Spaniards, Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, Thais, and Hawaiians, plus a few Tongans. Not many African-Americans though, and way fewer Hispanics than found in California as a whole. Moraga had one of the few Serbian Orthodox churches in America, a well as a church for Indonesian Christianity.

There were also a lot of immigrants from England and other Anglophone nations (Canada, Australia, South Africa, etc.) My next-door neigjbors growing up were a British woman and her Australian husband.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by alynnidalar » 16 Jul 2018 21:40

Salmoneus wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:44
But I find it equally weird, and frankly rather naive, for people to reply with 'oh, they're everywhere, you don't have to come to the US!' - sure, there must be some native americans in London, but we'd be talking a number you could count on your hands (well no, but not far off it). The NA population even of the US is very small, it's a population that's disproportionately tied to its traditional areas by poverty and prejudice, and outside of the American enclaves in London I'd suggest it would be really, really hard to find any in other western countries. [well, Canada, obviously, but...]
I don't know that anyone was suggesting that Fris would casually stumble across someone of Native American ancestry (who knows they have Native American ancestry) on a British streetcorner, more that if he really had his heart set on meeting someone of Native American ancestry, he could likely ask around and dig someone up in the UK eventually, and thus would not actually have to come to the despised US to meet one. Naturally it would be quite weird to start asking American expats if they or anyone they know in the UK is Native American, but that's sort of a given in this situation.

Also huge numbers of Hispanic and Brazilian people have some Native American ancestry, so there's always that. (although I'm aware that by "Native American" Frislander likely meant "American/Canadian person of Native American ancestry")

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 17 Jul 2018 01:02

Ànradh wrote:
15 Jul 2018 20:51
Lambuzhao wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:59
Now whether it's by pollination, or some kind of weird Xenomorphic, flower-ovum traumatization, I cannot recall.
XD
Lam, have I ever mentioned that I adore your vocabulary choices?
Thænx!
[:3]

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 17 Jul 2018 01:03

Khemehekis wrote:
16 Jul 2018 04:20
Lambuzhao wrote:
03 Jul 2018 14:04
Khemehekis wrote:
25 Jun 2018 01:24
I checked, and I do have "Cape gooseberry" (or "poha", as it's called in my neck of the woods) in Kankonian: yadzaliy. However, my Kankonian dictionary gives the scientific name as Physalis peruviana, not P. pruinosa.
Uff. Quite.

I asked some horticultural friends, and they tsked me on that one. 'Cape Gooseberry' or 'Golden Berry' is too frou-frou for our humble
Ground Cherry, or , if you prefer, :us-pa: :deu: Yuddekesche. [;)]

Still mighty tasteable, though. [:P]
Not familiar with the name "ground cherry". I love my poha jam, though.
Props to the Poha!
[:P]

Ya gotta love a fruit that tastes like cinnamon-apple pie with a zing of zesty (lemon? granny smith/crab-apple? Pineapple? I can't place it exactly).
It's like Willy Wonka created it from the tears of the Oompa-Loompas.
[:P] [:P] [:P] [:P]

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Lambuzhao » 17 Jul 2018 01:07

Xonen wrote:
15 Jul 2018 22:10
Lambuzhao wrote:
14 Jul 2018 23:59
Ànradh wrote:
14 Jul 2018 13:01
Xonen wrote:
14 Jul 2018 10:12
No, bees pollinate flowers. Yellowjackets (and other wasps) mostly just murder things.
I learned recently that wasps actually do pollinate, just not very effectively; they themselves eat nectar in their adult morph, but their grubs are insectivorous (which is why I used to think wasps were predatory).
If I remember correctly, one or two species of wasp help create figs. Now whether it's by pollination, or some kind of weird Xenomorphic, flower-ovum traumatization, I cannot recall.

Also, I recall that quite a few sleek black wasps, and skinny red & yellow (not yellow jackets) wasps would worry the mint flowers in our garden.
They both gave searing, bell-ringing stings if you were careless.

Furthermore, bees descend from wasps, actually. :wat:
So… … bees are wasps, in a similar vein how birds are therapod dinosaurs.…
Well, I'm more into etymology than vicious stinging insects myself, but at least (again) Wikipedia states that wasp is simply a generic term for "any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is neither a bee nor an ant". So I suppose it would make some sense to call all insects of order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita wasps with bees and ants as subgroups thereof, but whether or not anyone does this I don't know. Certainly most normal people wouldn't call an ant a wasp - but then, most normal people wouldn't call a chicken a dinosaur, either, so what do they know?

As for figs, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fig_wasp. Apparently, it involves both pollination and the larval stage living inside the host like a Xenomorph. The more you know.
Damn wæpsps! They foodle the humble fig coming and going! [:x] [:$]

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Xonen » 19 Jul 2018 18:18

So today, I was thinking about how I need to vacuum my apartment, so naturally, I ended up googling Roombas. Then, about two minutes after I'd finally gotten off my ass to do the damn vacuuming the old-fashioned way, my vacuum cleaner suddenly up and died on me. So... did Google's Skynet algorithm just realize I'm a potential robot buyer/victim and start somehow remotely killing my appliances to speed up the process? [D;] Also, which model of Roomba do I have the best chances of defending myself against in the inevitable event of it attempting to murder me in my sleep?

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Axiem » 19 Jul 2018 21:38

A roomba is a good way to keep the public parts of the floor relatively clean on a daily/couple-of-daysly basis. However, from my experience, it's not a good replacement for having an actual vacuum cleaner on hand. Even when I owned a roomba, I'd still want to vacuum for real every month or two, and always ended up getting a bunch of stuff the regular roomba attempts didn't.

Also, roombas work best in rooms that have lots of open space and not much in the way of furniture that creates strange vacuuming patterns.

Though it's also been something like a decade since I owned a roomba, so apply plenty of salt.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien » 19 Jul 2018 22:20

Family Guy taught me all I needed to know about Roombas:

Family Guy - Roomba

[xD]
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Xonen » 20 Jul 2018 15:28

I've actually owned a Roomba previously, so I have some idea of how they work (and how they don't). I just felt the need to share my twilight zone experience with someone. In any case, I might actually end up buying a different manufacturer's robot, solely because Roomba's descriptions in webstores seem like a poorly translated script of an American infomercial. Apparently, the most amazing feature of the brushes is that they can almost reach the far ends of the corners of my room... Which, I'll admit, is kind of amazing, in that they're actually advertising its fairly poor reach as an amazing feature. Then again, a Samsung might simply explode, so it's sort of a toss-up.

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by qwed117 » 20 Jul 2018 20:56

Apparently Turkey invaded Iraq last month. I never heard about it in the least bit in the news.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » 21 Jul 2018 20:06

Has anyone else noticed that “dungeon” is related to neither “dun geon” nor “dung eon”?

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Thrice Xandvii » 22 Jul 2018 01:51

Can't say that I have...

Especially since I didn't know that "dun" or "geon" were words.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Khemehekis » 22 Jul 2018 02:33

Dun, in English at least, is a dull greyish-tan color. Don't know what "geon" means -- is it a word in Korean or something?
Props to the Poha!
[:P]

Ya gotta love a fruit that tastes like cinnamon-apple pie with a zing of zesty (lemon? granny smith/crab-apple? Pineapple? I can't place it exactly).
It's like Willy Wonka created it from the tears of the Oompa-Loompas.
[:P] [:P] [:P] [:P]
Yes! Lemon, perhaps, from that citric acid in poha jam.

Or cranberry.
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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » 22 Jul 2018 05:14

Thrice Xandvii wrote:
22 Jul 2018 01:51
Can't say that I have...

Especially since I didn't know that "dun" or "geon" were words.
You can look up “dun”. It’s both a color (as Khem points out) and a verb.
Past-due notices used to be written on dun-colored paper —— or so I have read; it might not be true.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geon says there are at least three English non-proper-name meanings for “Geon”.
I just gambled that it was an English word; it looks like it should be.
(And yes, Khem, it is also a proper name in Korean, apparently.)

Not so sure “dunge on” is well-formed. “Dunge” is a word in Nynorsk*, but probably not in English.

*or would be if I had spelled it correctly, with the diacritic-looking parts of the letters
Last edited by eldin raigmore on 24 Jul 2018 15:24, edited 1 time in total.

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Milk & the FDA

Post by eldin raigmore » 22 Jul 2018 16:42

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration recently announced that no food or drug or other product over which the FDA has authority can be legally sold while labeled as “milk” unless it were “the lacteal secretions of a bovine mammal”.
This gives me pause.
I checked, and it turns out buffalo and yaks are bovine.
But goats and sheep and reindeer are not!
Goat milk and sheep milk are important (to some people) parts of the U.S. dairy industry.
In some states or other countries I would think that elk/caribou/wapiti/moose milk, like yak milk elsewhere, would also be important dairy products.
Then there’s human breast milk.
All are the lacteal secretions of non-bovine mammals.
Will they all have to be re-labeled in order to be sold legally in the U.S.?

Then there’s the drug, milk of magnesia. Not only is it not derived from any mammal, nor any other class or phylum of animal: It’s not derived from any plant, or any other taxonomic kingdom or domain of life.
Will it have to be re-labeled?

What about the cosmetic “cold cream”?

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Re: The Quintessential 5th Conversation Thread

Post by Clio » 22 Jul 2018 19:46

eldin raigmore wrote:
22 Jul 2018 16:42
Will they all have to be re-labeled in order to be sold legally in the U.S.?
Given the precedents for food names in the USA, I look forward to seeing "goat mylc" or "goat milk-product" on grocery store shelves soon!
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