Germanic qualities of language

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burzum0727
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Germanic qualities of language

Post by burzum0727 » 21 Mar 2014 02:23

Im looking to create multiple languages for my own personal use. I am looking for more experienced conlangers and linguists to give me some information on common themes across most or even all germanic languages extinct, no longer spoken, and spoken. I plan to develop all of mine off of this and any information on this would be very helpful thank you

Valosken
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by Valosken » 21 Mar 2014 10:29

Word order:
- Verb second in declarative sentences.
- Verb first in closed questions.
First, I learned English.
Dann lernte ich Deutsch.
Y ahora aprendo Español.

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Avo
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by Avo » 21 Mar 2014 12:56

Word- or root-initial stress and lots of ablaut and umlaut in declension and conjugation are typically Germanic too I guess. And the distinction between strong verbs (those that form their past tense forms via ablaut) and weak verbs (that form their past tense with a suffix).
And the reduced system of tenses, compared to other IE languages, which is essentially non-past vs past, with other tenses being formed periphrasically.

Salmoneus
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by Salmoneus » 21 Mar 2014 14:19

I think the question only really makes sense in a context: what's different about germanic languages compared to which other ones?

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atman
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by atman » 21 Mar 2014 15:54

In general, Germanic languages often have many phonemic vowels, frequent consonant clusters, fewer inflected forms in their nominal and verbal systems, umlaut...
Երկնէր երկին, երկնէր երկիր, երկնէր և ծովն ծիրանի.

burzum0727
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by burzum0727 » 21 Mar 2014 16:56

Well Salmoneus is it possible to break into language families such as Indo European and Proto Semitic and the like? Really anything that sets the Indo European language family apart from the rest of the languages in the world. There is one thing I read recently (recently is all I pretty much have haha as I have just become active as a conlanger) that said something along the lines of something being unique about how in the languages they don't have a certain form, and I apologize for the obscurity to this but i think it was verbs and how there is no future tense in the more ancient ones. I really wish I could remember it may have actually been when I was reading about the mythology and it applied to the context of their cyclical world view. Really without knowing much about linguistics I feel there may be something rather unique about their word systems. I know they tend to be a bit more poetic. If any of this is wrong please feel free to correct me as I am very very new to this world. I am excited and willing to learn however and anyone willing to help teach is very welcome.

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atman
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by atman » 21 Mar 2014 17:16

burzum0727 wrote:Really anything that sets the Indo European language family apart from the rest of the languages in the world.
So you want to know about the typical features of Indo-European (older terminology: Indo-Germanic) languages, not Germanic ones?

If you want, check out my own introduction to the IE language family and Proto-Indo-European itself: viewtopic.php?f=29&t=3170
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burzum0727
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by burzum0727 » 21 Mar 2014 18:46

Heheh sorry about that confusion I know that I separated from my original question... Yes I mean the Indo European ones but if that involves specific germanic ones thats perfectly fine as well. Im going to check out your link now.

burzum0727
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Re: Germanic qualities of language

Post by burzum0727 » 21 Mar 2014 18:53

Heres the article I was speaking of:
t’s important to keep in mind that the image of Yggdrasil and the Well of Urd is a myth, and therefore portrays the perceived meaning or essence of something rather than merely describing the thing’s physical characteristics. Yggdrasil and the Well of Urd weren’t thought of as existing in a single physical location, but rather dwell within the invisible heart of anything and everything.

Fundamentally, this image expresses the indigenous Germanic perspective on the concepts of time and destiny.

As Paul Bauschatz points out in his landmark study The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture, Yggdrasil and the Well of Urd correspond to the two tenses of Germanic languages. Even modern English, a Germanic language, still has only two tenses: 1) the past tense, which includes events that are now over (“It rained”) as well as those that began in the past and are still happening (“It has been raining”), and 2) the present tense, which describes events that are currently happening (“It is raining”). Unlike Romance languages such as Spanish or French, for example, Germanic languages have no true future tense. Instead, they use certain verbs in the present tense to express something similar to futurity, such as “will” or “shall” (“I will go to the party” or “It shall rain”). Rather than “futurity,” however, what these verbs express could more accurately be called “intention” or “necessity.”

The Well of Urd corresponds to the past tense. It is the reservoir of completed or ongoing actions that nourish the tree and influence its growth. Yggdrasil, in turn, corresponds to the present tense, that which is being actualized here and now.

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