Help me defining my typologically undefined type of script

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Serena
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Help me defining my typologically undefined type of script

Post by Serena » 05 Feb 2015 21:57


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These days I am working on the writing script for my liturgical language Gadyl, and I have to admit that I am quite satisfied about it. However, I found out that I really struggle to describe it typologically, it doesn't really fit with any other script I've ever encountered in my life. I would really appreciate if you helped me with it.

The script is basically made out of logographs. Gadyl grammar is based on triconsonantal roots for verbs and biconsonantal roots for nouns. Each logograph stands for a root. Each symbol is supplied with additional symbols (in a similar fashion to Hebrew nikkudim) that specify the vowels.

Furthermore, the symbols are joined together by ligatures, which makes it really look like an abugida, even if it's clearly not one. This is really weird.

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qwed117
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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by qwed117 » 05 Feb 2015 22:30

So logographs are the complete root? Or are they one letter in the root?
If the word "goddess" were written, would it be one or two glyphs?

The ligatures contain no information right? (I think Arabic(an abjad) has a ligature for "a" and "o")
Then this isn't an abugida
Is -**| one word? or us -**||-<**<.y one word? What is the phonetics of that word? What does each symbol represent?

Remember, "people" are going to be "using" that script, so you should make it as logical as possible
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Thrice Xandvii
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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by Thrice Xandvii » 06 Feb 2015 08:02

Abjadic pointed logography?

So, logograms represent consonants, and then vowel pointing gets you vowels, right? Logosyllabic would mean each symbol is a syllable, and by your description it isn't that...

Are there multiple ways to write /m/ or any other phoneme based on the meaning of the word? If there are only one or two ways that don't change with meaning, I might still call it an abjad (is the vowel pointing mandatory?). If not, mayhap my first suggestion makes the most sense? I think I'd need to hear a bit more about how it works.
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QuantumWraith
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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by QuantumWraith » 06 Feb 2015 11:41

Didn't Egyptian Hieroglyphs work in a similar fashion - with root consonants indicated by logograms, and vowels and/or consonants indicated by phonetic complements?
"Peace...? No peace!"

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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by clawgrip » 06 Feb 2015 14:12

Egyptian did not mark vowels at all, though the semivowel signs could possibly hint at them. Nevertheless, I would say Egyptian is conceptually similar. Egyptian supplemented logograms with (sometimes redundant) C/CC/CCC signs, Mayan supplemented logograms with (sometimes redundant) CV signs, and this one supplements with redundant V signs, so I would just call this script a logophonetic or semanto-phonetic script.

Serena
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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by Serena » 06 Feb 2015 16:44

qwed117 wrote:So logographs are the complete root? Or are they one letter in the root?
Each logograph is a combination of either one, two or three consonants. For instance, these are the three logograms that appear in the first block of sample I posted:
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The first one is a single consonant root, the second has two and the third has three. Here you can see the same three logographs, supplied with the vowels (I should point out that my original sample is partially wrong, here you can see the correct vowels):
Image
If the word "goddess" were written, would it be one or two glyphs?
If we are strictly talking about the word "Goddess", it would be just one glyph and the same applies for all the primitive nouns. However, words that are obtained by applying derivational prefixes and suffixes take more the one. For instance: in the sample, the second block means "peasant" and it is formed by the prefix m- meaning "worker" and the word pesh meaning "grain".
Remember, "people" are going to be "using" that script, so you should make it as logical as possible
Actually, people are not going to use it that much. In the Hanilian Empire, most people will use the greek alphabet (which they call "baby alphabet" for its simplicity) to communicate simple messages. The Anollim script is used exclusively for liturgical purposes. Most people will understand the basical words, but only the Wisemen know how to write it. Its main goals are aesthetics and complexity.

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qwed117
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Re: Help me defining my typologically undefined type of scri

Post by qwed117 » 06 Feb 2015 21:51

So based on the given, I would say it is similar to Japanese orthography, except with an abugida instead of a syllabary.
I make this assumption based on the dots that you have added supplying the vowels.
Last question, do the vowels contain semantic information? Or are they just there for clarification?

If you answer yes for Q1, it would be an abugida, If Q2 gets yes, then it would be an abjad.


Strictly this would be a _________ supplemented with a logography
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What is made of man will crumble away.

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