where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

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jlorber4
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where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by jlorber4 » 06 Jul 2019 15:20

Hello,
My son is still in high school, but is interested in conlangs specifically and linguistics generally. Any advice about U.S. colleges that excel in these fields would be much appreciated (I'm an ecologist and am ignorant about this world). Thanks for your time!

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eldin raigmore
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Re: where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by eldin raigmore » 06 Jul 2019 15:55

Wayne State University in Detroit.

jlorber4
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Re: where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by jlorber4 » 07 Jul 2019 01:32

Thank you!

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eldin raigmore
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Re: where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by eldin raigmore » 07 Jul 2019 14:47

Or the East Pole (MIT). Or the West Pole (UCSD).
Or see
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Po ... ole_divide
.

If you’re specifically interested in conlanging. Brown University is probably good.

If you might be interested in Canadian colleges and universities, there are some good ones but I am not well-informed about them.
There are also some good ones in English-speaking countries on other continents.
But you said the US. And the further away he goes the more expensive it will be. You probably want to send him somewhere in his home state or a neighbouring state. (I assume?)

—————

BTW which languages is he already fluent enough in to take classes taught in them? Maybe he’s fluent in Spanish or French or German?

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Re: where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by Nachtuil » 08 Jul 2019 00:32

As a Canadian I can say the University of Toronto downtown campus is good. They offer a lot of different language courses and I know one of the professors, Nathan Sanders, is very involved in using conlangs as a teaching tool. I've heard good things about the York University program but don't know much. I don't know about how other schools are but Christine Schreyer is a professor at the Okanagan campus for the University British Columbia and she has done conlanging work professionally for film. British Columbia is blessed with a lot of diversity in native languages so is a linguists playground.

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kiwikami
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Re: where to study linguistics/conlang in U.S.?

Post by kiwikami » 14 Sep 2019 04:08

This is a little late, but Swarthmore College, outside Philly, is a small liberal arts school with a good linguistics program (I'm biased - it was my undergrad - but the teaching there was very personalized and it was super easy to get involved in actual research as early as sophomore year). Nathan Sanders used to teach there, but doesn't now, and although it's not in the US, I can also definitely recommend U. Toronto for the sake of Sanders alone, since like Nachtuil said he incorporates conlangs a good bit (but also because he's the single best professor I've ever had). Swarthmore is rather known for its ling program, and deservedly so, I think.

U. Chicago also has an excellent ling department, very widely varied and friendly to dabbling in different subfields, with at least one professor (Jason Riggle) who incorporates conlangs now and then (he also teaches a course on them, I believe). It's a bigger school, but class sizes are pretty small outside the intro courses, from what I've heard.

MIT and Stanford are both big-name and have earned it for ling, but they're also big schools where it's harder to get involved in research or the like. U. Penn also, I've heard, has a very good ling program, though I can't speak for its classes or individual professors.
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

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