(Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Porphyrogenitos » 13 May 2019 04:10

The ship sailed on Neogrammarian sound change decades ago (or at least on an absolutist conception of it). We know that sound change isn't perfectly exceptionless but it's necessary to pretend it is when, for example, embarking on the reconstruction of a language family. And that assumption works pretty well - it just might become necessary to edit in certain irregularities later.

And as for definite articles and other grammatical particles, if they are to behave in an anomalous manner, they are going to anomalously participate in a sound change rather than anomalously resist it. Articles are some of the most frequent words in the language and are going to be highly prone to reduction - "practice makes imperfect". Take the English article the, which, along with a group of other grammatical particles that began with /θ/, spontaneously became phonemically voiced, even though voicing of /θ/ was regularly triggered only by an intervocalic environment (as in bathe). Their use was so frequent that speakers just began leniting their initial consonant.

So if there's a vowel shift from o: > u:, I don't think an article would be likely to resist that.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by CarsonDaConlanger » 13 May 2019 15:05

Reyzadren wrote:
10 May 2019 23:27
CarsonDaConlanger wrote:
10 May 2019 15:23
Speaking of which, how do langs with no tense and only aspect convey a generic past tense? Do they use perfective aspect? Wouldn't that just make it a tense anyways? For example how would they say "John fought the snake?"
Langs without tenses don't convey tenses because they don't need to. Most conlangers place too much value on tense and assume that tenseless langs need to somehow express them whenever a tense language does, especially with regards to tense agreement, which is false. The strategy and usage depends on the specific language really.

Relevant example from that other natlang that I speak: There are several things that one could use which would cause a resemblance of past tense. Using the word "already" (which I assume is what you mean by "perfective"), using a generic word that means "I am a past tense", add an additional clause such as "and this happened in the past", 0 (ie, do nothing). Which do you think is the most common method to translate "John fought a snake"?

The answer is 0. Ie, "John fight snake". This might seem strange to you, but nobody speaking this natlang ever spams "I am a past tense" (or the other ways) in every sentence, even when it is obvious from the translation that there was a past tense involved. The natlang simply doesn't care. In fact, my conlang does this too.
Wait, so how do you know that the action happened in the past?

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Creyeditor » 13 May 2019 16:35

From the context and world knowledge. Or you don't know at all, if it does not matter.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Reyzadren » 13 May 2019 23:47

CarsonDaConlanger wrote:
13 May 2019 15:05
Reyzadren wrote:
10 May 2019 23:27
The answer is 0. Ie, "John fight snake". This might seem strange to you, but nobody speaking this natlang ever spams "I am a past tense" (or the other ways) in every sentence, even when it is obvious from the translation that there was a past tense involved. The natlang simply doesn't care. In fact, my conlang does this too.
Wait, so how do you know that the action happened in the past?
I don't, but I don't need to because the speakers of that natlang don't care about whether it happened in the past or not. Much like we don't need to know about where it happened, why it happened or how it happened.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore » 14 May 2019 05:19

Reyzadren wrote:
13 May 2019 23:47
I don't, but I don't need to because the speakers of that natlang don't care about whether it happened in the past or not. Much like we don't need to know about where it happened, why it happened or how it happened.
More than one language with evidentiality, doesn’t require and typically doesn’t say when something happened/happens/will happen; but absolutely mandates that the speaker say how they know.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus » 14 May 2019 22:26

Tense usually isn't that important. On the rare occasions when it is important, it's usually clear from context - because if tense is important, it's because something is urgent, and urgency is usually made very clear from context.

If someone tells you "house burn down", it's easy to tell if they mean in the past or in the present - if they mean in the past, they look quietly sad, while if they mean in the present, they're screaming and pointing. If the house is burning down in the present and they AREN'T screaming and pointing, but only looking quietly sad, this probably means you either can't, or shouldn't, do anything about it anyway, so it doesn't really matter that it's not (yet) in the past.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by elemtilas » 14 May 2019 22:46

Salmoneus wrote:
14 May 2019 22:26
Tense usually isn't that important. On the rare occasions when it is important, it's usually clear from context - because if tense is important, it's because something is urgent, and urgency is usually made very clear from context.

If someone tells you "house burn down", it's easy to tell if they mean in the past or in the present - if they mean in the past, they look quietly sad, while if they mean in the present, they're screaming and pointing. If the house is burning down in the present and they AREN'T screaming and pointing, but only looking quietly sad, this probably means you either can't, or shouldn't, do anything about it anyway, so it doesn't really matter that it's not (yet) in the past.
True, but wouldn't you think such context would depend rather a lot on whose house burn down. Someone from down the road or a few blocks over might look quietly sad while the fire is in progress. The homeowner might scream and point regardless of when the event took place, though I concur they will almost certainly do so while the fire is in progress! If anyone looks quietly sad on account of can't do anything about it, they're expressing something other than past tense.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by yangfiretiger121 » 15 May 2019 18:44

Are the following arrangements plausible for my setting's current language:

1. Compound words, such as Ιφαυδύ [ʊ.ǃǃɑ.uˈȡʑuː] ("Star Navy"; formerly spelt Υεφαυδύ; βάϙ ['bɑːn] implied from word order), forming similarly to Latin while the Empire's or Emperor's possessions, such as Ϳό βάϙ Νάκέθε [joː 'nɑː.kɛ̥ː.ʇɛ̥] ("The Emperor's Military"; "emperor" formerly spelt Ϳάυ], form similarly to Japanese
2. Coalescence affecting VV sequences in simple words, such as ἀ [ḁ] ("great"; formerly spelt, εα) but not word-final vowel-into-word-initial vowel sequences, as seen in Star Navy's above translation
Last edited by yangfiretiger121 on 15 May 2019 19:49, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar » 15 May 2019 19:08

yangfiretiger121 wrote:
15 May 2019 18:44
1. Compound words, such as Ιφαυδύ [ʊ.ǃǃɑ.uˈȡʑuː] ("Star Navy"; formerly spelt Υεφαυδύ; βάϙ ['bɑːn] implied from word order), forming similarly to Latin while the Empire's or Emperor's possessions, such as Ϳό βάϙ Νάκέθε [joː 'nɑː.kɛ̥ː.ʇɛ̥] ("The Emperor's Military"; "emperor" formerly spelt Ϳάυ], form similarly to Japanese
If you're asking whether or not it's alright for a language to use both compounding and possessive constructions, then yes.
yangfiretiger121 wrote:
15 May 2019 18:44
2. Coalescence affecting VV sequences in simple words, such as ἀ [ḁ] ("great"; formerly spelt, εα) but not word-final vowel-into-word-initial vowel sequences, as seen Star Navy's above translation
So, you're asking if it's OK to have vowel coalescence occur within morphemes, but not across morpheme boundaries, such as in compound words? I think that should be fine, especially if the elements of a compound can still appear as independent words.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by yangfiretiger121 » 15 May 2019 20:02

Okay. Thanks.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Davush » 16 May 2019 19:23

Hello,

I am hoping to develop a descendent of Classical Qutrussan which develops pitch accent or register tone. I don't really want full contour-tones à la Chinese, but I am struggling to come up with ways to develop pitch accent or a register tone system. Does anyone know of any papers that describe how a non-pitch accented language might have gained pitch/register tones?

I know loss of codas is often a factor, but the outcomes seem very different depending on language? I.e. final /s/ might lead to a higher or lower pitch? Do I pretty much have free rein in deciding the pitch outcome?

I have read that coda > pitch/tone usually occurs before voicing of stops influencing pitch/tone, but I'm quite unsure how to proceed. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Creyeditor » 16 May 2019 19:26

Davush wrote:
16 May 2019 19:23
Hello,

I am hoping to develop a descendent of Classical Qutrussan which develops pitch accent or register tone. I don't really want full contour-tones à la Chinese, but I am struggling to come up with ways to develop pitch accent or a register tone system. Does anyone know of any papers that describe how a non-pitch accented language might have gained pitch/register tones?

I know loss of codas is often a factor, but the outcomes seem very different depending on language? I.e. final /s/ might lead to a higher or lower pitch? Do I pretty much have free rein in deciding the pitch outcome?

I have read that coda > pitch/tone usually occurs before voicing of stops influencing pitch/tone, but I'm quite unsure how to proceed. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
I think there are several papers on how certain Franconian dialects in Germany developed pitch accent. When I google "Franconian pitch accent" the first page of the google hits gives me at least three .pdf-files about their history.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Davush » 16 May 2019 20:04

Thanks, Creyeditor! I didn't know Franconian dialects have developed pitch accent - how interesting. I will check them out.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus » 16 May 2019 22:14

I'm no expert, but as a general guide, iirc I've encountered six different sources of tone:

- loss or neutralisation of coda consonants. Generally fricatives lead to low tones, sfaiaa. However, tones can change around once they're created, so... anyway, glottal stops being lost can result in either high or low - iirc, if they drop directly they tend to give high tone, while if they glottalise the vowel first that tends to give low tone. [I wonder if some fricatives giving low high tone might come via debuccalisation to /h/?] Voicing tends to lead to low tone.

- neutralisation of onset consonants. Voicing tends to lead to low tone. But again, tones shift - so a voiced initial might easily create a following 'rising' tone that then turns into an outright 'high' tone over time.

- neutralisation of vowel phonation. Phonation and voice can be closely connected.

- neutralisation of vowel length. [long vowels tend to be higher-pitched, so if they lose length they can be just high tone]

- neutralisation of stress. [stressed vowels tend to be higher-pitched, so if stress moves or is lost, old stressed vowels can be high tone]

- mora loss or gain [words can have typical contours in a language, and attempting to keep the old contour when a word lengthens or shortens can produce a contrast]

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Aszev » 17 May 2019 09:45

Here are two articles about ongoing tonogenesis in Afrikaans and Seoul Korean. You could also check out Punjabi (tone) and Serbo-Croatian (pitch accent).

In Mainland Scandinavian, pitch accent arose primarily from the contrast between mono- and polysyllabic words.

Osc. axl > Sw. ˈaxel (shoulder)
OSc. axull > Sw. ²axel (axis)

OSc. komr > Sw. ˈkommer (comes)
OSc. kennir > Sw. ²känner (knows) (> ˈkänner due to analogy)

OSc. endr > ˈänder (ducks)
Osc. vinir > ²vänner (friends)

OSc. (hund inn >) hundinn > ˈhunden (the dog)
OSc. etinn > ²äten (eaten)
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Zekoslav » 17 May 2019 11:21

I was toying with the idea to develop a pitch accent by distinguishing older and newer long vowels by pitch contour, but I didn't know it was actually attested. Hello Franconian!

I'm most familiar with tonogenesis by stress retraction, since that's the type of tonogenesis which happens most commonly in Western South Slavic, including my native dialect.

Originally, my dialect had free stress, but all stressed vowels had a non-distinctive falling contour. So words could be distinguished by stress like /ˈpeːta/ "fifth" and /peːˈta/ "heel". The first word had a non-distinctive HLL contour and the scond had a non-distinctive LLH contour.

Then, stress was retracted from short word-final vowels, because in Western South Slavic languages stress is horribly afraid of falling from the edge of the word and there's not many dialects which still keep it in that position.

So /ˈpeːta/ [ˈpêːtà] "fifth" remained the same, but /peːˈta/ [pèːˈtá] "heel" changed to [ˈpêːtá], and the words are now distinguished solely by pitch contour, HLL vs. HLH (well, it's a bit more complicated since the final syllable isn't completely de-stressed yet, but it seems that the contour is phonemic).
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by yangfiretiger121 » 20 May 2019 09:27

How likely is a derivation structure in which a word's first click denasalizes (if nasal) [ʞ̃ > ʞ], voices (if tenuis) [ʞ > ʞ̬], and de-clicks (if voiced) [ʞ̬ > g] for non-dental, non-lateral clicks with tenuis and voiced dental/lateral clicks becoming linguo-pulmonic stops [ʇ > ʇ͡q]?
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Creyeditor » 20 May 2019 22:05

I don't think there is a conclusive answer based on natlangs. Not enough data to generalize.
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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by GoshDiggityDangit » 21 May 2019 06:23

What are some good resources for Middle English? I'd kinda like to make an Anglo-lang, but don't really want to start at Old English.

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Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Keenir » 21 May 2019 08:47

GoshDiggityDangit wrote:
21 May 2019 06:23
What are some good resources for Middle English? I'd kinda like to make an Anglo-lang, but don't really want to start at Old English.
I once came across a thick hardcover book of words coined by Shakespeare.

my favorite reference for the Englishes (Kentish included) at my public library is https://www.amazon.com/Essentials-Early ... ay&sr=8-32

...though when I looked for it on Amazon, I found
https://www.amazon.com/Early-English-Ve ... ay&sr=8-17
https://www.amazon.com/Book-Middle-Engl ... way&sr=8-1

...so I'd suggest asking your library about an interlibrary loan.
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